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Disk Replacement: SCO Open Server

Quick question:  The OS is SCO Open Server 5.Something can't remember for sure but I don't think it really matters.

I have a disk that I want to replace because it is making some unusual noises and there is no fault tolerance in this system.  This system has been in production for quite sometime and I am nervous that it is ready to take a dump.

Can I just add the new disk to the system and perform a DD if=/dev/(current disk device) of=/dev/(new disk device) and then swap the new disk in once the operation is complete?

I am hoping that it would be this easy.   Of couse this system is old so I am not sure I will be able to find the same exact disk.  Will this be a factor?  If so, I am not interesested in salvaging space on a newer disk if I have to purchase something larger than the 9G that I have in the system currently.

Thank you,

isaint
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isaint
Asked:
isaint
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1 Solution
 
yuzhCommented:
You can use "dd" to clone the disk, but if you new HD is bigger in size, you will wast some disk space.

A better way to do it is to perform a full system backup to a tape, and then you "divvy" to partion your new disk (same number of partions, size of each partion >= old one).

then use emerency FDs (Boot and Root FDs), boot up the system to single user mode,
and then mount all the filesystem and restore it from backup.

eg:
cd /
find . -print | cpio -oacv -O /dev/rStp0

#backup the whole system to a tape.

or just boot up the harddisk to single use mode, and use "cpio" to copy each filesystem
to the new harddisk.

also see: http:Q_21059011.html for more details.

PS: if you use "dd" to copy the HD, the harddisk ID is also copied accross, you don't need
      to go to the SCO website to re-register the system.
      For the "cpio" sulution, you need to re-register the system, and then run scoadmin to
      put the new key in.

Good luck!
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yuzhCommented:
You can also use  symantec ghost  (6.x or newer) to ghost SCO UNIX with two identical Hardisk. (I have try it a few years ago).

But personally, I would not use ghost, the UNIX dd command can do the some job (image copy).

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isaintAuthor Commented:
I am not interested in adding any additional space to this server- keeping it up is my main concern.   I am also not interested in using any 3rd party apps such as ghost.  

So am I to understand that my syntax above for the "dd" command will do the trick?  What I mean is that if I choose to use a larger disk and use dd will there be any problems cloning it using this method or do I need to add any additional flags/arguments to the syntax.

Thank you for the responses and the help!

isaint
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yuzhCommented:
The systax for "dd" is very simple:
      dd if=/dev/<device-of-source> of=/dev/<device-of-target>

man dd
to learn more details.

     The problem is that you need to add the new harddisk to your system (reconfigure
the kernel!).

     I think it is a lot easy to download g4u (FD image, use rawrite or dd to copy the
image to a FD). then just plug your new harddisk in the clone the disk. (g4u is very
easy to use, it can handle SCO, FreeBSD, Solaris X86 and M$ Windows ...)
    Here's the link:
    http://rfhs8012.fh-regensburg.de/~feyrer/g4u/

PS:
   >>  What I mean is that if I choose to use a larger disk and use dd will there be any problems cloning it using this method or do I need to add any additional flags/arguments to the syntax.

   Apart from you lost the extra disk space and the HD ID is copied accross, I can see any
other problem, I have no worked with SCO for a long time now.


   
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