Help me setup the MX and A records correctly?

Hi guys,
I could use some help. I have a customer that is hosting his own mail and web. However he wants to use our service as a backup mail provider.

Whats the best and accurate way to setup his domain records with the correct A and MX records

I currently have:

DOMAIN                        TYPE                  IP

Domain.com                     A            hiswebserver.com
NS1.myserver.com            A            ip to mywebserver.com
NS2.myserver.com            A            ip to mywebserver.com
hiswebserver.com             A            ip to hiswebserver.com
Domain.com                     NS          NS1.myserver.com
Domain.com                     NS          NS2.myserver.com
Domain.com                     MX          hiswebserver.com   VALUE 5
Domain.com                     MX          mywebserver.com   VALUE 50


myserver.com = my webserver ( the backup mail provider)
hiswebserver.com = the customers webserver and mailserver

My concerns are on the NS records.
Should I have NS1.hiswebserver.com and NS2.mywebserver.com  ?

Brad_nelson1Asked:
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humeniukCommented:
Are you providing primary DNS service for his domain (ie. your server is an authoratiative nameserver for his domain)?
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Brad_nelson1Author Commented:
I'm not sure I understand what you are asking.
They are running Microsoft DNS on thier mail server so I would assume they are the primary DNS
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humeniukCommented:
For any domain, you must have one primary name server and at least one (and maybe more) secondary name servers.  These name servers must have different IP addresses.  So, what name servers are listed as the primary and secondary name servers for this domain and where is the primary name server located?

If NS1.myserver.com and NS2.myserver.com are the primary and secondary name servers assigned to this domain, it looks like you have everything set up properly, provided that NS1.myserver.com and NS2.myserver.com point to different IP addresses.

Also, the two MX records should point to host names, not . . .

Domain.com   MX  hiswebserver.com   VALUE 5
Domain.com   MX  mywebserver.com   VALUE 50

. . . but instead (for example) . . .

Domain.com   MX  mail.hiswebserver.com   VALUE 5
Domain.com   MX  mail.mywebserver.com   VALUE 50

There should be a corresponding host record as well . . .

mail.hiswebserver.com  A  ip to hiswebserver.com

. . . in DNS for the hiswebserver.com domain, and . . .

mail.mywebserver.com  A  ip to mywebserver.com

. . . in DNS for your mywebserver.com domain.

Is it possible to provide the actual domain name?  That would make things a bit easier.
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Brad_nelson1Author Commented:
well my whole point in this is to be able to offer him a backup mail service so that if his server goes down, my webserver will collect his mail.

so my question on the name servers. is can i do this:
Domain.com                     NS          NS1.his-server.com
Domain.com                     NS          NS2.my-server.com

that way if his server is down, the internet can get the records from my server

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humeniukCommented:
If he has DNS set up that is working properly to begin with, all he needs to do is add an MX record that points to a host name on your domain (ie. mail.yourdomain.com).  He doesn't need to modify the existing NS records in that case.  You have to make sure that the host name that he uses (ie. mail.yourdomain.com) has an entry in yourdomain.com DNS that resolves that host name to your mail server's IP address.  As you have done above, you give his mail server a higher priority than your mail server.  If his mail server goes down, your mail server will take over.

This may be of interest to you: "DNS Oversimplified" - http://www.rscott.org/dns.  It gives a pretty comprehensive overview of everything you need to know to set up DNS.
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