Enableing swap partition on install

Hi, I am trying to set up a linux on a older machine 133 with only 16Mb of ram, but after the install starts in prints an error that I have not enaugh memory. I have made a swap partition of 200Mb but it does'nt mouts it automaticaly. I have tryed to pass the kernel the 'swapon /dev/hda5' but thoes'nt seems to work either. On other places I have found that I should write the 'swapon /dev/hda5'  but does not specifiy where. Actualy I am looking for the kernel param that would enable swap automaticaly and I could continue with my install
Thanx in advance!
XumxumAsked:
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jeilerCommented:
Try installing using text mode.  

Most distributions use a ram disk and syslinux for the actual install program so they won't use a swap partition on the harddrive.
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XumxumAuthor Commented:
I was installing in text mode!
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wesly_chenCommented:
Hi,

   First, please run "fdisk -l /dev/hda" to check partition /dev/hda5 is swap type (id 82)
----
     Device Boot    Start       End    Blocks   Id  System
/dev/hda5   *         1       255   2048256   82  Linux swap   <== Id is 82
----

   Then edit /etc/fstab and add:
/dev/hda5               swap                    swap    defaults        0 0

   Besides, you can add "swapon /dev/hda5" in
/etc/rc.d/rc.local     for (Fedora/RedHat)
/etc/rc.d/boot.local  (SuSE)
/etc/init.d/local  (Debian) (If not there, create one with first line "#!/bin/sh" )
to turn on swap at boot.

   Which Linux do you use? RedHat or Mandrake ?

Wesly
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XumxumAuthor Commented:
I can't install it , so therefore I can't edit /etc/fstab or any other files... daaa ,that is my problem , that I can't install it! And it is surely a swap partition, I have mounted it and used it under knopix (bootable linux from cdrom) By the way, I am trying to set up RedHat 7.3, but I would like to set up fedora 3 but my machine won't boot fedora 3 only redhat 7.3., that would be my other problem!
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wesly_chenCommented:
> would like to set up fedora 3 but my machine won't boot fedora 3
Fedora has some issues with old CDROM. As for your P133 16MB RAM, I'm not sure it meet the hardware
requirement of Fedora. If it meets, then Fedora will be very very slow.

You can install Knoppix on hard disk, too.
http://www.freenet.org.nz/misc/knoppix-install.html

Or customerize your Knoppix CD:
http://uberhip.com/godber/plug/knoppix-customizing.pdf

Wesly
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jlevieCommented:
As far as I know you can't get the installer to use a swap partition. You might be able to install 7.3 by connecting this disk to another machine with sufficient memory, but it will be terribly slow. I'd suggest looking around for some used memory. For a machine of that age it should be pretty cheap (or even free).
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jeilerCommented:
If you really feel adventurous, you can edit the initial ram disk used during install.

First backup your original iso

Mount the iso image of the first cd
mount -t iso9660 -o loop FC3-i386-disk1.iso /mnt/isoimage

Then go into there and grab the initrd.img file
cp /mnt/isoimage/isolinux/initrd.img /tmp/initrd.img.orig

This is a compressed filesytem image so extract it first
cd /tmp
cp initrd.img.orig initrd.gz
gunzip initrd.gz

Now mount the filesystem image
mount -o loop ./initrd /mnt/somewhere

go into /mnt/somewhere and make any changes you want
when you are done:
unmount /mnt/somewhere
gzip initrd
mv initrd.gz initrd.img

cp initrd.img /mnt/isoimage/isolinux/
umount isoimage
burn cd with new iso image
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