Want to protect your cyber security and still get fast solutions? Ask a secure question today.Go Premium

x
  • Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 620
  • Last Modified:

Changing read write permissions on a shared network folder

I have a PC running Windows XP connecting to a Mac running OS X in a peer to peer network.
On the Mac is a folder named User.  I can connect to this folder from the PC by mapping a network drive to the IP of the Mac and the folder name i.e. \\192.168.0.2\user
My problem is on the Mac this folder has Read Only rights.  The account that I am logged on to the Mac as does have the box checked that says allow this user to Administer this computer.  However, even with this option I cannot change the properties of this folder to Read & Write.  That is greyed out.
As a workaround I copied the subfolder in User that I want to work in to the folder on the Mac named Shared because Shared has Read & writer permissions.  But when I try to map a drive to that folder from the PC \\192.168.0.2\Shared the PC says it can't find it
So the answer to anyone of the following questions will solve my problem.
1.  How can I change the attributes of the User folder to Read & Write?
2. Why can I map to the folder User but not to the folder Shared?
0
krlseidl
Asked:
krlseidl
  • 3
  • 2
1 Solution
 
zmoCommented:
   Hi,

        The attributes you get on the directory you're mounting are
    the same the users has on the system. The Administrator privilege
    is completely something else, it's wether or not your user can gain
    administrator privileges by running a little program called 'sudo' (if
    you don't know it ;).

        So you just need to do either one of these things, depending on
    the context :

        You want to modify the directory foo in the share Shared. Be sure
    that 'foo' has the same group and/or the same user as the user you
    use to connect to the computer, or the directory has read/write
    permissions for all users. If you want to modify informations use the
    lock next to the permissions pane, and if you want to modify 'all users'
    you need to first change the file's owner to you, change it, and then you
    can change it back to the original owner.

        Just try to avoid modifying system-wide directories like /Users,
    /System, /Library... And another thing to be aware of, /Users/Shared
    has special permissions (to know why, have a look at
    <http://www.experts-exchange.com/Q_21325731.html>).

    my $0,02 ;)

--
Guyzmo
0
 
krlseidlAuthor Commented:
I am going to rephrase the question.  I gave some of the details incorrectly.

I have a PC running Windows XP connecting to a Mac running OS X in a peer to peer network.
On the Mac is a folder named User\user.  User is the login name used to login to the Mac.  I can connect to this folder from the PC by mapping a network drive to the IP of the Mac and the folder name i.e. \\192.168.0.2\user
My problem is on the Mac this folder has Read Only rights.  The account that I am logged on to the Mac as does have the box checked that says allow this user to Administer this computer.  However, even with this option I cannot change the properties of this folder to Read & Write.  That is greyed out.
As a workaround I copied the subfolder User\user that I want to work in to the folder on the Mac named Shared because Shared has Read & writer permissions.  But when I try to map a drive to that folder from the PC \\192.168.0.2\Shared the PC says it can't find it
So the answer to anyone of the following questions will solve my problem.
1.  How can I change the attributes of the User\user folder to Read & Write?
2. Why can I map to the folder User\user but not to the folder Shared\user?
0
 
zmoCommented:
   Hi,

        I'm not sure, but for 1) you should do this :
    1/ Command-I on the folder
    2/ Expand the ownership and permissions section
    3/ Click on the lock to get admin privileges
    4/ Change the owner from 'system' to 'user'
    5/ Change the "other" permissions from "Read only" to "Read & write"
    6/ Change back the owner from 'user' to 'system'
    7/ Relock the section

    What you did with this is giving read&write to *everyobdy* in the directory.
    Of course, the same way you can change other rights. It seems it did not
    work on my own homedir, but it may be filevault's fault. And doing what I
    just told you is a *serious* security leak on your box.

    What I don't understand is what you want to do _exactly_. You want to have
    your home folder publicly accessible ?! Why don't you connect to your mac
    using \\user:password@192.168.0.2\user\ ? (or at least \\user@192.168.0.2\user\)
    Then, you'll have full read/write access to your files, and this (almost)
    safely.

    I hope this helps,
    Regards,

--
Guyzmo
0
 
krlseidlAuthor Commented:
I will give this a try and let you know how it goes.  Thanks for the info.
0
 
krlseidlAuthor Commented:
Please don't consider this question abandoned.  New computers have been ordered because of all the problems.  Once they come in I will use the method outlined above to connect to the MAC and award points.
0

Featured Post

Free Tool: Path Explorer

An intuitive utility to help find the CSS path to UI elements on a webpage. These paths are used frequently in a variety of front-end development and QA automation tasks.

One of a set of tools we're offering as a way of saying thank you for being a part of the community.

  • 3
  • 2
Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now