?
Solved

BGP Protocol Expert

Posted on 2005-02-24
10
Medium Priority
?
438 Views
Last Modified: 2008-02-01
I need to configure BGP v4 on my network, but I have only book/training knowledge of the protocol. Any resources out there I can use to make my first configuration with BGP a successful one? Also, any idea as to how long it should take? I could really use your help with this one.
0
Comment
Question by:glpolite
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
10 Comments
 
LVL 13

Expert Comment

by:Dr-IP
ID: 13398972
Is it for between multiple routers on your network, or is it just between your router and your ISP’s?
0
 

Author Comment

by:glpolite
ID: 13401980
Its between 2 routers on the network, possibly 3 if my company gets another. If I had to include ISP's how much it complicate things?
0
 
LVL 79

Expert Comment

by:lrmoore
ID: 13402517
Typically, BGP is only used between you and an ISP, unless you're talking about a MPLS circuit using private BGP numbers. That's a piece of cake and shouldn't take more than a few minutes per router.
If to an ISP, then that adds a few more gotchas, you need your own private ASN and your own IP subnet, and other factors..
0
Supports up to 4K resolution!

The VS192 2-Port 4K DisplayPort Splitter is perfect for anyone who needs to send one source of DisplayPort high definition video to two or four DisplayPort displays. The VS192 can split and also expand DisplayPort audio/video signal on two or four DisplayPort monitors.

 

Author Comment

by:glpolite
ID: 13408039
Do you find using MPLS to be a fast and productive solution to solving bandwidth issues.
0
 
LVL 79

Expert Comment

by:lrmoore
ID: 13408064
Yes, I'm very pleased with the service offerings from both AT&T (IPFR) and MCI (PIP). It makes Disaster Recovery planning much easier, provides full site-site connectivity without the complexity or necessity of full-mesh frame relay PVCs.
The bgp config couldn't be easier:

  router bgp 6500x
   neighbor 192.168.255.1 as 6500z
   network <local LAN>

! Done
At the core site, you might want to broadcast a default:

  router bgp 6500y
    neighbor 192.168.254.1 as 6500z
    network 0.0.0.0
  ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 <firewall/gateway>

! Done

Need more bandwidth, just add another T1 line and BGP does automagic load-balancing
0
 

Author Comment

by:glpolite
ID: 13408156
Wow, thats so simple its scary. I'll give it a whirl and see how it goes. You've been great help. If I have any more inquiries I know where to come. Thanks.
0
 
LVL 13

Expert Comment

by:Dr-IP
ID: 13410679
I myself usually recommend EIGRP between company routers and BGP for routers connecting to ISP’s with multiple links, and static routes when it’s a single link to an ISP. Some of the reasons I like EIGRP better it is more dynamic that BGP, and learns about neighbors on its own, so when you add a new router into the mix, you don’t have to worry about changing the EIGRP configuration of neighboring routers.

Another reason I like doing it this way, is when you throw into the mix ISP’s that require complex BGP configurations you don’t have to worry about to other routers BGP configurations becoming an issue.

Where I am working now is a good example of that situation. I have dozens of routers on my backbone, and on my boarder router which is connected to the internet with 3 circuits the BGP configuration has become a nightmare, I probably have a hundred lines in its configuration just for BGP to get the traffic to flow the way it’s supposed to go, and the last thing I need to worry about is some other router BGP on my network throwing the boarder routers delicate balance off.

Besides that, despite how complex the boarder routers BGP configuration has gotten, the EIRP configuration of the rest of the routers is still just as simple, as when there where only a few of them, as a mater for fact they all have the same EIRP configuration except for the network statements, but other than that they are all the same.        

router eigrp 1
redistribute connected
redistribute static
network X.X.X.X
no auto-summary
0
 
LVL 79

Expert Comment

by:lrmoore
ID: 13410738
Agree w/Dr-IP, but for MPLS connection to AT&T IPFR or MCI PIP, BGP is required, not optional.
0
 

Author Comment

by:glpolite
ID: 13411388
yeah, i'm only dealing with 2 routers here so far, and possibly 1 more if it becomes necessary. When I came into the place it was dedicating one router to Video Conferencing and used the other router for everything else. They were having bandwidth issues in this configuration even with 2 t1's (benefits of having a lot of money but no network security). At the time I've been asked to subnet 4 of the offices computers off from the rest of the PC's on the network. If I were to use the EIGRP protocol could I do this and place priority of bandwidth to those pc's? Or when EIGRP is configured properly it works just that well to distribute bandwith efficiently that theres no need for placing priority?
0
 
LVL 13

Accepted Solution

by:
Dr-IP earned 2000 total points
ID: 13412028
EIGRP is an efficient routing protocol, but congestion control is not it purpose any more than it is for BGP’s. For congestion control there are things like QOS (quality of service) which can be used to prioritize traffic over other traffic. Rate limiting is also handy for controlling bandwidth usage, for example you can limit FTP and or HTTP bandwidth usage to for example to no more than 250K, so that someone downloading a large file doesn’t hose up the network for everyone else.

Also since you mention two T1’s and video conferencing, if they are you links between two offices you probably should think about changing them to a multi link PPP bundle  with fragmentation and interleaving. So that larger data packets can be broken up and more efficiently mixed in with the smaller packets most real time service like VOIP and video conferencing use.

This by the way does put a heavy load on the routers processor, so it doesn’t work well on low end routers, but you say they have money, so you should be able to sell them on a more powerful router if it becomes an issue.        

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/iosswrel/ps1835/products_configuration_guide_chapter09186a00800b75cc.html
0

Featured Post

On Demand Webinar: Networking for the Cloud Era

Ready to improve network connectivity? Watch this webinar to learn how SD-WANs and a one-click instant connect tool can boost provisions, deployment, and management of your cloud connection.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

In the hope of saving someone else's sanity... About a year ago we bought a Cisco 1921 router with two ADSL/VDSL EHWIC cards to load balance local network traffic over the two broadband lines we have, but we couldn't get the routing to work consi…
There are two basic ways to configure a static route for Cisco IOS devices. I've written this article to highlight a case study comparing the configuration of a static route using the next-hop IP and the configuration of a static route using an outg…
After creating this article (http://www.experts-exchange.com/articles/23699/Setup-Mikrotik-routers-with-OSPF.html), I decided to make a video (no audio) to show you how to configure the routers and run some trace routes and pings between the 7 sites…
After creating this article (http://www.experts-exchange.com/articles/23699/Setup-Mikrotik-routers-with-OSPF.html), I decided to make a video (no audio) to show you how to configure the routers and run some trace routes and pings between the 7 sites…
Suggested Courses

770 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question