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Lan to Lan routing using Windows Server 2003

Posted on 2005-03-03
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Last Modified: 2010-03-18
Well, the problem is that we have adquired a new server with Windows Server 2003 in order to replace an old unix server which has been functioning as file server and router for our office within the company. As a first step I'd like to configure the new server as router so I got the current IP configuration from the unix server and I configure the two nic´s in the new one with the same numbers, that is:

NIC 1 for LAN A (which goes to other network segment of the company):
IP 10.12.1.9
MASK 255.255.255.192
GATEWAY 10.12.1.62
DNS 10.12.1.1

NIC 2 for LAN B (which is for our network segment in the office):
IP 10.12.6.193
MASK 255.255.255.192
(NO gateway)
DNS 10.12.1.1

Also all PC's in the office have as default gateway the IP 10.12.6.193. So apparently I have the same IP configuration in the new server and I have enabled Routing and Remote Access Service following the wizard selecting "LAN routing" in the first screen and then I select "LAN routing only" in the General tab within the properties option in the server name; so from the server I can ping every computer on both sides without problem, I mean LAN A and LAN B, but from clients in my office I can ping only to 10.12.6.193, 10.12.1.9 and 10.12.1.1 but that´s all, I cannot go beyond this.

What do I need to do??? please help!

And sorry for my english but I haven´t practiced for a long time :)
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Question by:drodalejo
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10 Comments
 
LVL 7

Expert Comment

by:blin2000
ID: 13451127
assuming you have enable LAN routing and no NAT or have correct NAT settings, I a question regarding your mask, 255.255.255.192 that covers only 64 hosts. pleaserefer to this page about calculating subnet and hosts, http://www.chicagotech.net/reference/calculatehosts.htm
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Author Comment

by:drodalejo
ID: 13451402
I don't have NAT, in fact I don't want to use NAT cause I need each PC in 10.12.6.x subnet go to 10.12.1.x with its own IP addresse in order to contact a proxy server which validates who has internet access. Ohh and I really don't understand your question about my MASK but as I said this configuration has been working for years with the unix server and I really don't know why we have that MASK.
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LVL 14

Expert Comment

by:Joseph Hornsey
ID: 13451981
You're right, drodalejo... you don't need (or want) NAT.  That would screw everything up since both addresses are private.  The subnet masks surprised me but don't pose problems with routing the network IDs.  So, the problem's got to be the config.

You said "clients in my office"... is that LAN A or LAN B?

I think I know what it is, but I have to know which LAN you can successfully ping from.

By the way, no need to apologize for your English... it's nearly perfect.

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Author Comment

by:drodalejo
ID: 13452104
Thanks SplinterCell,

and regarding your question, when I say "clients in my office" I refer to LAN B.
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Accepted Solution

by:
Joseph Hornsey earned 800 total points
ID: 13452168

Here's what I'm thinking:

1. If your PC on LAN B can ping 10.12.6.193, then LAN B is good.
2. If your PC on LAN B can ping 10.12.1.9, then the W2K3 server is routing to its local interfaces (which is not, by the way, something that happens by default)
3. If your PC on LAN B can ping 10.12.1.1 (assuming that the DNS server is another box on LAN A), then the Windows server is routing fine.

Check to make sure that there is a static route on your default gateway router that points to 10.12.1.9 for LAN B.  It could very well be that the router and the old Unix box were using RIP or some other routing protocol to share routing informaiton.  I'm assuming that this is the case and that the DNS server was given a static route for LAN B which is why it can respond.

Let me know what you think.

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Author Comment

by:drodalejo
ID: 13452363
Wow, that was a very good description of my situation.

Now I remember that when I was exploring the configuration of the Unix server I saw the gated daemon running and a file named gated.rip enabling rip protocol, so I think you have found the cause of my problem. The bad news in this case are that I'm not the admin of my default gateway router so I cannot add any static route; I could ask for this support to the admin of that router but I'd prefer to avoid it due to the bunch of politics and procedures in the company.

Anyway, is there an alternative solution to this problem??? Could I use RIP in my new server as it has been used with the old unix box??

I really appreciate your time and help!!
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LVL 14

Expert Comment

by:Joseph Hornsey
ID: 13452423
Check out these link:

Overview of deploying RIP:
http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/WindowsServ/2003/standard/proddocs/en-us/Default.asp?url=/resources/documentation/WindowsServ/2003/standard/proddocs/en-us/sag_rras-ch3_03d.asp

Deploying RIP on RRAS on Win2K3:
http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/WindowsServ/2003/standard/proddocs/en-us/Default.asp?url=/resources/documentation/WindowsServ/2003/standard/proddocs/en-us/mpr_node6.asp

Hopefully, following the steps in the second link will cause the default gateway to pick up the routes being advertised by the Win2K3 server.

If not, then you're going to have to either ask someone to add the static route to the router, or you're going to have to get into the router and do it yourself.  If it's a Cisco router and you have physical access to it, you can always reset the password.  If you're not good with Cisco, I wouldn't recommend messing with it at all.

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Author Comment

by:drodalejo
ID: 13452598
Ok, I'm going to try this right now and let you know the results but just one more question:

I have read the documents in the links and I don't have clear if I need to configure both nic's to use RIP or just the one that goes out of my office (I mean 10.12.1.9). Could you clarify me this??

Thanks again...
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LVL 14

Expert Comment

by:Joseph Hornsey
ID: 13452614
Only set up the interface that will be communicating with the default gateway, as far as I know.

Post back if it works... I'm interested to see if the RIP thing resolves it.

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Author Comment

by:drodalejo
ID: 13453070
Everything OK!!!

You are great, I configured RIP in the interface which communicates with the default gateway and now I'm using my new server.

Thank you so much!!!
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