I need to upgrade a Windows 2000 AD Server to a new box with Windows Server 2003 Active Directory

I have a Windows 2000 Active Directory server that is also the domain controller.  The box that the server is dying fast and needs to be replaced.  I would like to go to 2003 on my new server box.  Is there an easy way to migrate all of my users, computers, policies, and other files from my old server to my new one.  I do not want to change domain names, so the new server would be configured with the same forest, domain name, and computer name.  Is this possible?
jaredburkeenAsked:
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Christopher McKayMicrosoft Network AdministratorCommented:
Upgrading from Server 2000 to Server 2003 is a supported path.

You can insert the Windows 2003 Server disk into the Windows 2000 Machine,
Allow it to "upgrade" active directory forest (Prepare it for running under Server 2003.)
Clean install Server 2003 on a new machine,
Promote the new machine to a DC
Transfer all FSMO roles to the new machine,
Demote the old machine.

As with all major changes to a server, you need to ensure you have a good current backup of the data before doing these.

Hope this helps!

:o)

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jaredburkeenAuthor Commented:
I apologize for my ignorance ahead of time...

I don't want to change domain names.  Can I put to DCs with the same name together on the same AD forest?  If not, can I rename the new one later?

Thanks
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Christopher McKayMicrosoft Network AdministratorCommented:
You can have multiple DCs on a single domain.
Your server name will change (you can't have the same machine name), but your domain name will remain the same.

:o)

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mikeleebrlaCommented:
there is a bit more to upgading a 2000 domain to 2003.  See this article below for a real world how to guide.  This guide is for an in place upgade (same server) but you still prepare your forest/domain the same.  Ive used this guide for many upgrades and never had any issues:

http://commodore.ca/windows/windows_2003_upgrade.htm

you dont have to transer the FSMO roles manually. when you demote the old server this will be done automatically to the new server.
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jaredburkeenAuthor Commented:
Ok, I have the Windows 2003 server online and it is added as a DC within my domain.  However, I cannot get the replication to work to the new server.  I keep getting errors regarding DNS problems, however I cannot find where the problem is.  

I read a bunch of tech articles about it, and all of them reference these 4 folders that I am supposed to have in my DNS zone listing.  However, I don't have them.  One article told me to run "netdiag /fix" and that was supposed to resolve this.  However, all I get with that is more errors.  The error is telling me it cannot register my domain on the IP address given for the DNS server.  However, these are the same machine.

If anyone knows where I can start looking for resolution to my new DNS problem, I would appreciate it.

Thanks.
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mikeleebrlaCommented:
you must be talking about the srv records. And you are correct if you dont have srv records on your dns servers it will cause all kinds of trouble.  Do you have thes zones on EITHER of your DNS/DC's or just not on the new one?
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mikeleebrlaCommented:
are both domain controllers/dns servers pointed to themselves for DNS name resolutions?  this is done on the NIC properties.

Question: What should I do if the domain controller points to itself for DNS, but the SRV records still do not appear in the zone?

Answer: Check for a disjointed namespace, and then run Netdiag.exe /fix. You must install Support Tools from the Windows 2000 Server or Windows Server 2003 CD-ROM to run Netdiag.exe.
 

the above is copied from:
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;291382

below are a few good articles about srv records


http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/WindowsServ/2003/standard/proddocs/en-us/Default.asp?url=/resources/documentation/WindowsServ/2003/standard/proddocs/en-us/sag_DNS_imp_ManagingRecords.asp


http://www.petri.co.il/active_directory_srv_records.htm
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jaredburkeenAuthor Commented:
No.  The original server is pointed to itself for DNS name resolution and the new server is also pointed to the original server for DNS resolution?  Should both servers be pointed to themselves for DNS?

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mikeleebrlaCommented:
both should be pointed to themselves if they both are in fact DNS servers. To check to see if they are both DNS servers go to start>programs>administrative tools>services

then look for the dns server service.  If both servers have the dns server service make sure they are both pointed to themselfs for DNS name resolution.
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jaredburkeenAuthor Commented:
Only the original 2000 server is a DNS server.  The new 2003 server is not and is pointing to the original server for its DNS.  Is this ok, or should both be DNS servers?  The new server was originally a DNS server, but while setup that way I could not promote it to a DC on my domain.  Once I turned off the DNS, then I could promote it and join the domain.
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mikeleebrlaCommented:
every domain must have a DNS server and since you are going to be removing the 2000 server you will need to install DNS on the 2003 server.

go to control panel, add/remove programs, windows components and add the DNS service, it is in the networking section.

then go to start>programs>administrative tools>DNS and create an "active directory integrated" DNS zone named domainname.com where domainname.com is the DNS name of your domain.

to find the dns name of your domain go to start>run>cmd
and type in set then enter.  look for the "userdnsdomain" line (near the bottom) this will list the dns name of your domain.  FYI the userdomain line lists the netbios name of your domain.  Make note of these as you will need them later.
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jaredburkeenAuthor Commented:
When I load DNS on the new 2003 server, it installs fine, but when I try to configure it, I only get an error saying that it cannot connect to the specified DNS server.  It is on the same machine.  I don't understand.  Is this because both servers are on the same domain?  You can have 2 DNS servers on the same domain, right?

Also, I am still having problems with the old server's (2000 Server) DNS.  I still do not have the srv records that I need.  I cannot run netdiag /fix as it just gives me more errors:

[WARNING] Cannot find a primary authoritative DNS server for the name
  'ensureserver.ETD.'. [RCODE_SERVER_FAILURE]
  The name 'ensureserver.ETD.' may not be registered in DNS.

There are several in a row after that.

I checked and do not have a disjointed namespace that I can tell.  The domain name is a single word, instead of the domain.com format.  Does this make a difference on how I get DNS to work?
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