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Moving Files from FAT32 System to NTFS

I want to move my files from my old hard disk running WinXP pro FAT32 to my new one running also WinXP but formated as NTFS, so is it possible that if connected the new one as a slave to the old one and move the files, i mean is it possible to copy them directly like copy and paste from the FAT32 system to NTFS without using an intermediate media like copying to a CD and then using it on the NTFS.

Thanks on advance.
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JessyEzzy
Asked:
JessyEzzy
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1 Solution
 
LucFCommented:
Hi JessyEzzy,

Just copy/paste won't give you any problems, as long as you have the rights to write to the new disk (obviously) you'll be able to get the files from the FAT32 disk.
The filesystem has nothing to do with these kind of things.

Greetings,

LucF
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JessyEzzyAuthor Commented:
Ok LucF i'll give it a try & tell u the results, the reason I asked the question was because I was told that copying from FAT32 to NTFS is not possible, so I wanted to check it from experts.

Thanks.
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LucFCommented:
The filesystem has nothing to do with the actual content of the files you want to copy.
So, when you copy something from a FAT32 filesystem to a NTFS filesystem, exactly the same contents will just be copied, the OS will do the copy, the filesystem only has to store it.

LucF
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e_sandrsCommented:
LucF has this all wrapped up, but just FYI, what you may have heard is that OS's that use the FAT32 file system (like Windows 98) cannot read or write to an NTFS disk.

Again, as has already been said, if your OS supports both file structures it's just a drag and drop operation.
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mafoCommented:
To be sure, boot up with the WindowsXP NTFS filesystem and use the FAT32 disk as an assistant (slave part) disk to copy _from_. That will be the safest solution. :)
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WatzmanCommented:

What you were told is wrong.  Just copy them.  Drag and drop.
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BigSchmuhCommented:
And you can add NTFS read/write capability to a Win9x using the freeware below
     http://www.sysinternals.com/ntw2k/freeware/ntfswin98.shtml
==> Of course, it does not handle NT security neither EFS (Encrypted File System from Win2000)

hth
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WatzmanCommented:
The version at that page provides read-only support, not read/write support as you stated.
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mafoCommented:
I believe that JessyEzzy already have solved the problem, copied the files without any problems :)

I believe that Windows XP can read/write from/to the FAT32 and the NTFS (up to v3.1) no matter type of partition WinXP itself is installed on.

:D
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JessyEzzyAuthor Commented:
First, sorry guys for being late and thanks a lot for all your comments.

Second, no mafo I didn't solve the problem, actually I wasn't able to do anything, because I did something terrible, I broke one of the pins of my old hard drive while attaching the cable to it.
So I won't be able to copy anything, my data is lost :(

Anyway if I happened to be in this situation again & I want to copy from FAT32 to NTFS, I now know that it is possible, thanks to you all, you have assured that this is a possible thing to do.

JessyEzzy.
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WatzmanCommented:

Any good technician could either repair your drive or jury rig something that would let you access it.  If all that you damaged was the connector, the data is not lost unless you want to give up on.  If that data is really valuable to you, contact me, and I can recover it and burn it to a DVD (or several).

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JessyEzzyAuthor Commented:
Thanks Watzman, I don't know what is the connector, the pin that was broken, is the one that doesn't have an opposite pin infront of it, the one in the middle.
I happend to find a technician that can weld another pin instead of the broken one and I'm waiting for the results, cos the data is really valuable and that really teaches me a good lesson which is always backup your data before attempting to do anything stupid like what I did. I think I'm not very good at hardware stuff.
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WatzmanCommented:

First of all, there is one pin that is SUPPOSED to be missing.  It's near the middle, on the bottom row.  It's used to keep you from plugging the cable in backwards IF you have a "keyed" cable (a cable that is missing one of the "holes" in the cable connector).  However, most cables are not keyed.

Secondly, about half of the pins are ground.  Although it's pure luck as to whether, if you broke a pin at all, you broke a ground or signal pin, if you broke a ground pin, or if you broke SOME signal pins, the drive will still work.

Third, be very, very careful who you trust this drive to.  An "expert" is someone who knows more than you do, and from your posts (no disprespect intended here), I suspect that there are a ton of "experts" who, if they were allowed to work on the drive, would be more likely to screw it up than to be of any assistance.

If you can take a closeup of the drive connector with a digital camera, and send it to me, I could give you more assistance.
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