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DDNS server on WinXP client.

Posted on 2005-03-04
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Last Modified: 2010-05-19
Don't ask.  Just don't ask.

Okay, supposing I want to have client machines use a DDNS service on a non-server (i.e. WinXP Pro client) lookup LAN resources..?  

Is there any way to run DDNS service on "client" os's..?

Mucho thankos,

-- scott.

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Question by:scdavis
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26 Comments
 
LVL 11

Expert Comment

by:rafael_acc
ID: 13464507
Hi.

By "(...) on a non-server" you mean that os is not windows server, right? I guess you want to use a DDNS on WinXP Pro client in order to configure a WEB Server using IIS, right?

Well, have a look at http://www.dyndns.org/

You must then install a client application locally on your computer and install it (you download it from the above site); it should ran as a service. At last, configure WinXP Pro not to shutdown down RRAS connections on logoff if you want to have your connection up, even when you log off - this is almost simulating an always-on connection.

I most admit that this last step (about keeping RAS connections ON) I'm not sure if it can be performed on WinXP Pro machines, however.

Cheers.
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LVL 11

Expert Comment

by:rafael_acc
ID: 13464518
http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=158909

Check this link to configure RAS connection not to disconnect when logging off. This config is available for windows 2000 Pro/Server.

I believe if windows 2000 pro can do it, win xp would do it too.

Cheers.
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LVL 12

Expert Comment

by:GinEric
ID: 13464528
First, what do you mean by "DDNS?"  Do you mean Dynamic?  If so, it's DHCP, not DDNS.

I think you also mean "run DHCP Server" on a client machine.  It's possible, but for looking up a LAN resource, the DHCP client is already running on Win XP Pro, usually, and it is used to locate resources, so is a DNS client, sometimes a WIN Services client, etc.. These are all network services that run to connect any machine to the network, not just the Internet, but the entire network, Internet and Intranet.

Right click you LAN connection in the systray, Select Properties, TCP/IP, Propterties, Advanced, and you will see four tabs: IP Settings, DNS, WINS, and Options.  DNS contacts whichever server is appropriate, static or dynamic [DHCP].  WINS specifies some DHCP stuff.  Normally, you would find dhcp on a server under C:/WINDOWS/system32/dhcp/ of you had a DHCP Server running.  On the client side, again under LAN Connection, Properties, TCP/IP, the "Obain an IP address automatically" and "Obtain DNS server address automatically" are the dynamic [DHCP] client.  The other selections are for static IP.

Your DNS Server has to support LAN lookups.  This is usually automatic in the LAN assigned ranges and comes from the DNS/DHCP Servers on your LAN side, and never from the Internet DNS Servers.  Addresses like 192.168.x.x are not allowed on the Internet.  They are strictly assigned to Intranets.  You will get "Gratuitous ARP Request" if you try to lookup a LAN address on the Internet, or, a message from a  Root Server to the same effect.

So, if you want to run DHCP on the LAN side, you will need a LAN DHCP Server.  While it is possible with Win XP Pro, it's not easy to implement.  It comes with XP Server, it has to.

You might try looking into Linux as there are numerous programs written for Linux that are now being ported to Windows, such as Apache Web Server which will run even on XP Home.  Not even suggesting you switch to Linux, but see if there are any Linux DHCP Servers ported to Win.  They will work on any Win XP box if they have been ported to it, like Apache has.

That is the best way to find the answer.  And please explain, did you really mean DHCP?
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LVL 12

Expert Comment

by:GinEric
ID: 13464546
A quick PS:

RAS is dialup oriented.  If you're connect with highspeed, like DSL, then RAS is more of an interference than a usable service.  DSL does not use RAS because it is always connected and does not need to connect or reconnect.  If you do lose connectivity, it is the lease time of the assigned DHCP to your ethernet connection that has expired, corrected by ipconfig and ifconfig.

ipconfig /renew

in Windows.
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LVL 11

Expert Comment

by:rafael_acc
ID: 13464552
GinEric, DDNS stands for Dynamic DNS!!

A client can be configured to dynamically update DNS records with a DNS server, when it receives a diferent IP Address from a DHCP server.

It can be configured in the local network. Additionaly, an external entity could provide this service so that, when a user gets connected to its ISP, a client application (which is locally installed on the client machine) automatically connects with this external service and updates DNS records so these refer to the newly assigned IP address.

Hope it's clear enough ... That's kind of difficult to explain, anyway...


Cheers.
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LVL 11

Expert Comment

by:rafael_acc
ID: 13464561
A working example is http://webxp.homeip.net
This is my home address. Everytime I connect to ISP I get a different IP Address. However, the name "webxp.homeip.net" is always updated to "match"/point to the Ip addr I get from my ISP. In this way, no matter what IP address I get assigned, everytime you go to the address http://webxp.homeip.net you are accessing my server, at home!

Cheers.
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LVL 7

Author Comment

by:scdavis
ID: 13464617
When I get a DHCP address... I get 1.1.1.1, Then the the DHCP server dynamically updates the DNS server with my hostname.  Not the hostname I specified in my ddns provider, but my REAL hostname... the one I specify in Windows, the local hostname I give my machine, not the one I give my dynamic DNS provider.

So!  If we want to finally accept the fact that we have a protocol that can map names to IP addresses (DNS):-) and for god's sake STOP using layer3 or *shudder* layer2 broadcasts to that ****, we need to get DHCP that dynamiclly assigns my IP to update a local DNS server of that name, so I can resolve network resources without using some freaking hack like WINS.....
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Author Comment

by:scdavis
ID: 13464622
Aside from all that..

WHAT I WANT TO DO IS RUN DDNS SERVER ON WINXP PRO.

Is that  possible?

Do I have to run Bind9 on XP to do it?  

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LVL 11

Expert Comment

by:rafael_acc
ID: 13464643
Well ... I would say no more than I've already said. The problem is that you are using some "hard" words which do not make any sense ... Try and calm down ... Then give me a good practical scenario so I could better understand what are you trying to achieve! I'm not quite clear yet if you are to get external ddns resolution or internal only?!

Cheers.
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LVL 11

Expert Comment

by:rafael_acc
ID: 13464649
So you have an external DDNS provider right?! Let's call it extDDNS. You get ip addresses from dhcp server. Now what?? Is this the ISP dhcp server or your internal dhcp server?! Are these services you are trying to implement to be accessed by external users or they are for you internal network only?

Rafael.
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LVL 12

Expert Comment

by:GinEric
ID: 13464854
DDNS does stand for Dynamic DNS, while DNS stands for Domain Name System.  So, you have, Dynamic Dynamic Name System.  But that is an Apache term, not a networking or Internet term.  The name for networking IS DHCP - Dynamic Hosts Control Protocol.

The Apache term, where DDNS was coined, is an Apache feature that allows a DHCP assigned IP address to be used for a Web Server.

It was also "borrowed" by some "free" DNS and other services to describe a way in which to pretend your IP is that of a Fully Qualified Domain Name [FQDN].  Such services work by redirecting your dynamic IP to one of their static assignments and routing traffic to your dynamic IP of the moment.  That would be a so-called "DDNS Provider."

Regardless of their services, his machine still uses DHCP to resolve his hostname.  The Internet routers are not going to "update" for an assigned block of dynamics, but the DDNS provider will.  Therefore, his name servers have to intervene when name resolution is requested for his IP.  The root servers and the ISP Name Servers are not going to update upon request by a customer because it would seriously hamper their ability to route traffic.  They assign a reverse record once for every IP in their block and only change it for a static IP of a FQDN, at a cost to the customer.

The DDNS providers use the hostname originally provided by the customer's ISP.  They translate this into an alias that they have created to redirect traffic to what seems to be a FQDN.

scdavis, I said the answer for running a server on Win XP Pro is to use Apache.  Apache has multiple features, one of which is to use the DHCP IP number and accept traffic to whatever name you give the web server.  As for running a full Server on Win XP Pro, no, you cannot do that.  Microsoft sells Server 2000, Server 2003, and XP Server, among others, for that purpose.  But be prepared to spend thousands of dollars for such a program.

On the other hand, you can run a Linux server with no cost.

Linux is currently running many Windows programs.  Many Windows programs are being ported to Linux at SourceForge.net

There is a difference between a "Server" and a "Web Server" or "DNS Server" or "ftp Server"

The "Server" serves all of these services, while things like the "Web Server" serve on one service.  That's the difference.

You can find an old computer at a flea market for under $100 and install Linux and have your server up within a few hours.

Linux also handles dynamic IP addresses and can pretend they are FQDN servers.  Which is pretty much how the DDNS providers do it.

The DHCP address is assigned by your ISP.  It may be redirected by a DDNS Provider.  There are going to be problems with the DDNS provider clashing with your ISP's DHCP Server.

If you're getting 1.1.1.1 addresses, you have further problems.

Another point is that if your ISP is assigning a "webxp.homeip.net" they are basically providing DNS Hosting services for a hostname for your computer from dyndns.org

and your IP Address, according to dig, is 82.154.159.142

which is: Answer:
82.154.159.142 PTR record: bl5-159-142.dsl.telepac.pt. [TTL 7200s] [A=82.154.159.142]

and/or a "one bounce off" of

142.159.154.82.in-addr.arpa.

The question you ask is not really a simple yes or no, yes you can but there will be problems, and it's unlikely that you can run the DDNS server because your DDNS provider is running the DDNS Server.

As for Bind, you're asking for even more problems with Windows.

For the 1.1.1.1 and returning your ISP hostname, it's most likely your pointing to your ISP's name servers and not getting to your DDNS provider's name servers where your pseudo-name gets resolved for your DDNS hostname.

1.1.1.1 looks suspiciously like an IPv6 header address and many DDNS Providers and possibly your ISP are not yet equipped to handle IPv6; another pitfall where resolution of names can fall through.

In any case, the answer is in Apache and Linux.  Apache can accomplish it in Windows, but the whole thing works much better with at least one Linux Box on your home network.

If you can't get your DDNS provider working, you're going to have to figure out what you're doing wrong, most likely it is the Name Servers you are relying on to resolve your pseudo-name.  And it is a pseudo-name until you register a domain name, at which time it becomes a Fully Qualified Domain Name [FQDN] which will resolve nearly all of your problems for about $8.95 a year at GoDaddy.com

You can spend a lot of wasted time in chasing down DDNS, or you can start to solve the problem with Apache, an FQDN, and possibly a Linux Server to add next to your Windows XP box.

It's up to you.




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Expert Comment

by:GinEric
ID: 13465069
Scuse me, keyboard problems, "Dynamic Dynamic Name System" above should be "Dynamic Domain Name System".  my bad.  Just thought I'd correct that.
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LVL 79

Accepted Solution

by:
lrmoore earned 500 total points
ID: 13465696
scdavis,
Take a look at this product
http://www.jhsoft.com/

Else, you could use BIND 9 on XP
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LVL 7

Author Comment

by:scdavis
ID: 13465879
lrmoore,

You pegged it.  Points are yours.

Bind 9?  Uggh.  Not looking forwards to it.  

Cheers,
S.


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LVL 7

Author Comment

by:scdavis
ID: 13465887
Sorry about the "hard" words -- hope this clarifies my language:

A)  Forget Apache.
B)  Forget DHCP.  (sorry I mentioned it above)
C)  When I use the Acronmy "DDNS" -- I mean "Dynamic[ly updated] Domain Name System"..  I am not referring to the commonly used "dyndns.com/org" service.  I mean a domain name server running on a platform that most folks don't expect..  essentially, the in-house, peer-to-peer mini-server PC.
 



Okay, here's the real-world scenario..

1)  Remote XP client.
2)  VPN serving device (pptp, let's say)..  like SMCBC14VPN.
3)  Internal network at 2.2.2.0/24, say.

4)  Remote Client Addr is 12.13.14.15
5)  PPTP assigned Addr is 10.0.0.10


So, Once PPTP is auth'd and connected, the SMC lands the PPTP session at 10.0.0.10 and routes to machine at 2.2.2.2.  

Because it's routing, there's no broadcast name resolution, eh?  

How does the remote client at 12.13.14.15 find services available from 2.2.2.2..?  


I've done it with LMHosts.  I've done it with manual, static DNS entries.






What if I want to do this for like 50-200 sites?  I'll be damned if I am going to maintain 200-800 LMHosts files manually.

Essentially, I'm looking for a "name resolution" service -- without all the complexity of Active Directory.  DDNS - why not?

Okay, Authentication -- you might say.  A valid concern.  So the DDNS won't get filled with rubbish.

If the service for workstation MS products exists, either from the O/S community or from a commercial vendor, I'm lookin' for it.

Auth could be as simple as a pre-shared key.  (and no, no IKE/IPSEC is involved.. prayin' to jawyeh.)





Does that clarify what I want?  

Thanks,
-- Scott.
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LVL 7

Author Comment

by:scdavis
ID: 13466016
Woah.  

That Simple DNS ..  sucks.

It is entirely not what I'm looking for.  It appears to not support DDNS whatsoever.


How can I retract my "acceptance" of an answer?  Is that possible?

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LVL 11

Expert Comment

by:rafael_acc
ID: 13466336
Nope, you can't. So ... all you can do is just keep posting ... and we should keep replying. Or, you can open a "new" question!

Continuing then ...

So far as I understand your last posts, I'd say you are not looking for a DDNS solution rather a NAT one. You need to translate your external requests to the PPTP device, to the internal network. Is that right? If so, then again, you must configure NAT.


Cheers.
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Expert Comment

by:lrmoore
ID: 13466690
I've asked a moderator to un-accept the answer here so you can keep working this.

I saw this in the "features" section for the product and thought it might be at least worth exploring
"Direct support for dynamic IP clients "

>Because it's routing, there's no broadcast name resolution, eh?  
Correct. The "Microsoft" answer is WINS or Dynamic DNS (on Windows SERVER)

>How does the remote client at 12.13.14.15 find services available from 2.2.2.2..?  
LMHOSTS, HOSTS, DDNS or WINS
Welcome to Windows networking.

Want a simple solution? Setup a WINS server, or setup a Win2k3 DDNS server. If you're going to service several hundred clients, it only makes sense to have a 'real' server OS and not bastardize a desktop OS to provide true "server" services.

Just my humble opinions...

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LVL 12

Expert Comment

by:GinEric
ID: 13467323
hahahahaha, I was about to tell you that I tried Simple DNS Plus about 6 months ago.  It did not last 3 days.  You're right, it sucks.

So I'm gonna suggest Bind 9 and that you learn what a DNS Server is.  Your IP is already on dyndns.org as my digs showed above, had your understood them.

And now, you must indeed ask another question, and think before you award points on a whim.

For 25,000 points I will teach you how to set up Split Brain Chrooted and Jailed DNS.

Got that much?

:)

Forget DDNS, try calling it what it is, either DNS Server or DHCP Server.  For the isolation of Internet and Intranet, it's either a bunch of configure files, or Split Brain DNS with login via either Samba or Microsoft.  There's also Cookie Login, and MySQL, and others.  They're all related and what you're trying to do is going to take more than just DNS, dynamic or otherwise.  Bind 9 would be a solution, but someone is going to have to teach you a lot on how to get it, install it, configure it, and the other programs related to your desires.  You may even have to learn how to compile it.

There is no single vendor solution for what you want to do.  I have done what you are trying on XP, a Home Box and and a Server; it can be done, but it's a lot of work.

Meanwhile,  stop calling DHCP "DDNS" because that is not what it is, and I'm running a Microsoft Server [actually 5 of them] with both DNS Manger and DHCP Manager, there is no "DDNS" on it.

And if you really want a real server, it's going to be Linux.

I doubt you can afford the Microsoftware, the Server and all the other software required by your users.  You're talking in the hundreds of thousands, possibly millions.  It's an economic survival question, not a "how much of the stockholders money can we squander" question.

If you're ready for the big time scdavis, I'll lower that cost to you for a one time offer of 500.

The actual answer to "Okay, supposing I want to have client machines use a DDNS service on a non-server (i.e. WinXP Pro client) lookup LAN resources..?  " is to use Bind 9.2.3 or above.
thwbbbbbbb!!!!
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Expert Comment

by:GinEric
ID: 13467330
Oh yeah, almost forgot, did I mention that it that how I did it on an XP Home box?  Used Bind to make the XP Home box into a DNS Server [which is by defintion and design both a DNS Server and a DHCP Server,what someone keeps calling "DDNS"]

Just so you'll know.

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LVL 7

Author Comment

by:scdavis
ID: 13467817
GinEric:
> hahahahaha, I was about to tell you that I tried Simple DNS Plus about 6 > months ago.  It did not last 3 days.  You're right, it sucks.

I asked for specific functionality, lrmoore suggested a software package.  I assumed that package would do what I was asking for -- but It did not.  I'm the kind of person that trusts other folks.

My bad, for sure.  I feel so horrible.  I'm obviously an insufficient person.  *shakes head in disgust*



> So I'm gonna suggest Bind 9 and that you learn what a DNS
> Server is.  Your IP is already on dyndns.org as my digs
> showed above, had your understood them.

Sunshine, I did my first linux (slackware) install in '92 from 5.25" floppies onto a 386/sx (25Mhz).   I understand what DNS is - and what dynamicly registered DNS is.  I grew up with this technology.

You've fscked up my IP address -- it has nothing to do with DynDns.org.  Try again.  


> And now, you must indeed ask another question, and think before
> you award points on a whim.

Arrogant little person, aren't you?


> For 25,000 points I will teach you how to set up Split
> Brain Chrooted and Jailed DNS.
> Got that much?
> :)

I've got 2 fBSD boxen here - for 0 points I'll show that you're having an enjoyable, but somewhat foolish ego trip.


> Forget DDNS, try calling it what it is, either DNS
> Server or DHCP Server.  

No, DDNS means a specific function - a DNS server where the client devices register themselves in "my" zone.. usually using some form of authentication.  If you don't understand that specific distinction - you should get back to the books.



> For the isolation of Internet and Intranet, it's
> either a bunch of configure files, or Split Brain
> DNS with login via either Samba or Microsoft.  


Actually, the trend in the field is to stick those "DMZ'd" boxen in a routed (and still statefully packet filtered) "routable" subnet.  [read:  NO NAT]  The split-brain config is silly.  It's too complex for most shops to operate around..  I mean, who expects web dev's to understand the difference between "internal" and "external" IP addresses ..  nevermind what NAT is..?!

You're propigating the "must-NAT, must-NAT, must-NAT" myth.  Have you ever thought outside of that box?  



> There's also Cookie Login, and MySQL, and others.  They're
> all related and what you're trying to do is going to take
> more than just DNS, dynamic or otherwise.  

That's outside the scope of that I'm asking for.  I'm asking for Name Resolution Services -- nothing more.   Your assertion that I'm attempting to bundle authentication services into this query is frankly -- just wrong.  You don't seem to be able to isolate the name - address tools..  Are you sure you understand DNS?



> Bind 9 would be a solution, but someone is going to
> have to teach you a lot on how to get it, install it,
> configure it, and the other programs related to
> your desires.  You may even have to learn how to compile it.

Yeah, I'm aware of Bind.  Especially v8.  

I've run various versions of Bind under various O/S's for nearly a decade.

Again, you're an arrogant little one, ain't ya?  







> There is no single vendor solution for what you want
> to do.  

All that ranting and raving -- and finally you admit that your answer to my question is -- there's no such tool.. (other than bind9)  

Listen -- I wasn't expecting that there was a perfect tool for this case.

Unfortunately, you've raved and ranted and inflated your own ego to whatever end.  

Please learn to write about the specific issues - and don't fly off the handle assuming that you're the packet-god in the future, eh?


<SNIP the rest of your silly rant>



-- Scott.  




PS:


> and your IP Address, according to dig, is 82.154.159.142
> which is: Answer:
> 82.154.159.142 PTR record: bl5-159-142.dsl.telepac.pt. [TTL 7200s] > [A=82.154.159.142]
> and/or a "one bounce off" of 142.159.154.82.in-addr.arpa.


Entirely incorrect.  First, I'm in Canada.  Second, my residence has a /29 staticly assigned.  Guess again, goofus.

Did you DIG a banner-ad..?  Cripes, I have no idea how you got that so wrong.  
Grow up, Play nice and share.  

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Expert Comment

by:GinEric
ID: 13471276
What I wrote, was the results I got.  "What I have written, is what I have written."

We have a thing in America, about trust relationships: "In God We Trust."  The saying goes, "all others must pay."

I'm not arrogant, others seem to agree you jumped the gun; personally, I'm not here for points, I give these guys lots of respect for helping others at such a cheap price.

The validity of the information is only as good as the reporting source.  From what I've seen lately, Canada is the first country trying to hide all domain ownership information; it makes us all wonder why.

Regardless of your personal defintion for DDNS, the accepted definition of dynamic DNS remains DHCP in the professional field, no matter how many years you use the newspeak.

You said " everytime you go to the address http://webxp.homeip.net you are accessing my server, at home!"

It's not me that's wrong here; you're the one who said your site is webxp.homip.net, which gets No match for "WEBXP.HOMEIP.NET"., but homeip.net is dyndns.org, and webxp. is just a host on one of their servers, a pointer to your machine.

The result of accessing your site:

Server Error in '/cvRafael' Application.

here's how I got your reverse record:

Asking h.root-servers.net for 59.153.154.82.in-addr.arpa PTR record:  
       h.root-servers.net says to go to sec1.apnic.net. (zone: 82.in-addr.arpa.)
Asking sec1.apnic.net. for 59.153.154.82.in-addr.arpa PTR record:  
       sec1.apnic.net [202.12.29.59] says to go to ns.ripe.net. (zone: 154.82.in-addr.arpa.)
Asking ns.ripe.net. for 59.153.154.82.in-addr.arpa PTR record:  
       ns.ripe.net [193.0.0.193] says to go to ns2.telepac.pt. (zone: 153.154.82.in-addr.arpa.)
Asking ns2.telepac.pt. for 59.153.154.82.in-addr.arpa PTR record:  Reports bl5-153-59.dsl.telepac.pt. [from 194.65.3.21]

which is an "offshore" provider in the Asian Pacific region, bounced back to Canada.

I don't see any /29 static assignment, for your house.

I don't see any host resolution for your site.

Your site fails.

And you're telling me you know what you're doing in DNS, computers, Linux, and administration.

Meanwhile, calling me names.

Then why don't you do it the way every professional does, fix your reverse records by using one of those static IP addresses?

Can you afford the $10.00 a month for the IP?

This here "goofus" was working on the first Linux, Unix, on its design, a long time ago.

Which may have well been before you were born.

Think, for one minute, you're the one who said your site and your IP resolution were not working; I stated the results I got.  Obviously, they would be wrong if your site wasn't working, and you've already admitted that.  Why then accuse someone else of making mistakes while your are asking what the mistake is that you're making?  Maybe you've gone on the defensive in resistance of the offered help?

"Rant"and "rave" are not really nice words to throw at someone who takes the time to write a lengthy explanation of how to approach your problems.  It's not playing nice, and it's not sharing, as you put it.

If you think my manner of speaking and/or writing is egotistical, and have discounted it thereby, you have made yet another mistake, one of judgment, or lack thereof, and disrespect.

I have participated in a few questions for work on a book, not for points.  Principally, the chapter on "Stress and Psychological Stressors in Network Administration."  The frustrations of seeking solutions that are simple by overcomplicating the task at hand, is one of the effects of compelling time constraints placed on administrators. Lashing out and namecalling are the general symptoms of stress.

I'll keep the dialogue as an example.

To alleviate the stress, meanwhile, fix your own DNS and forget the freebies, they don't work.  DNS management is work, you're right; using freedns is ducking work, no more than that.  Ducking work is another symptom of job related stress, even for the self-employed.

Funny how I've gone through all the DNS work and feel no stress myself.  I enjoy the educational process, and the results I get are the rewards, a working network, no routing problems, 100% up time, customer satisfaction, etc..

Which makes me feel better about myself, and endears me to others, i.e., I get along quite well socially and professionally, thank you.  I do like to function above the arena of namecalling and bad manners.  Does that make me egotistical or bad in some manner? I don't think so.

Check your own ego, not mine.

For any person or business claiming to have a static /29 block, the answer remains to be: use a static IP and control your own DNS.



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Author Comment

by:scdavis
ID: 13525537
> What I wrote, was the results I got.  "What I have
> written, is what I have written."  We have a thing
> in America, about trust relationships: "In God We Trust."  
> The saying goes, "all others must pay."  I'm not arrogant,
> others seem to agree you jumped the gun; personally, I'm
> not here for points, I give these guys lots of respect
> for helping others at such a cheap price.


Eric?,

Americanization aside -- sure, I dumped hard.  You deserved it.  

Comments such as "someone is going to have to teach you a lot on how to get it, install it, configure it," are outright condescending and rude.

You laid the first bomb.  I'm pointing out that your assumptions about my knowledge are incorrect.  





> The validity of the information is only as good as
> the reporting source.  From what I've seen lately,
> Canada is the first country trying to hide all domain
> ownership information; it makes us all wonder why.

CIRA is a mess.  No contest there.  

You're making this a nationalistic whine-fight?  You could stay on topic, eh?  .. but no -- you want to make it a "mine is better than yours" -- which may or may not be true.. but is totally IRRELEVANT to ddns/this post.





> Regardless of your personal defintion for DDNS, the
> accepted definition of dynamic DNS remains DHCP in the
> professional field, no matter how many years you
> use the newspeak.


Here, I take issue with your statement.  Dynamic DNS may be equated with DHCP -- by tinkerers and toyers that don't know enough history to isolate the two *DISTINCT* protos.

They *ARE* distinct protocols and I belive your "co-mingling" does a disservice to all users of said protos..

Call yourself professional?  I call you twinkie-pants.  See?  Don't take it personally -- I'm pointing out your FALSE call to authority.




> You said " everytime you go to the address
>http://webxp.homeip.net you are accessing my server, at home!"

Rafael(?) wrote that.  Not me.


> It's not me that's wrong here; you're the one who said
> your site is webxp.homip.net, which gets No match
> for "WEBXP.HOMEIP.NET".,

<SNIP DUE TO STUPIDITY>


READ THE TEXT, ERIC.  WEBXP is not me.



> And you're telling me you know what you're
> doing in DNS, computers, Linux, and administration.

YES.



> Meanwhile, calling me names.


YES.

Apparently, you can't read.



<SNIP DUE TO STUPIDITY>



Goofus, go back and re-think and re-read it.  Have enough maturity to admit to your failures.


-- Scott.

0
 
LVL 12

Expert Comment

by:GinEric
ID: 13526579
Well, my last words are, "You're the smartest person that every lived; you fix it."

After that, get yourself down to a personality clinic, yours needs real help.  You are really quite arrogant, testy, and seem ready to start a fight with anyone who doesn't think your way.  I admit I was wrong; wrong for even trying to talk to you.  It won't happen again.

You, one the other hand, will never admit you're wrong.  I've got you pegged too, buddy.
0
 
LVL 7

Author Comment

by:scdavis
ID: 13527986
Eric,

Yes, I'm arrogant, abrasive and testy.

I asked for a specific tool -- you mis-interpreted my request, then
rambled off loads of ego-centric blither.

Your heart is in the right place.  I do believe that you are trying to help.

Unfortunately, your help isn't up to snuff.  You write before you think.

Use your brain before your fingers, okay?

-- S.

0

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