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Retreiving email on my SBS2003 Server via Outlook Express and POP3

I want to be able to allow my remote staff to obtain email from their Exchange 2003 mailbox (on SBS2003) via POP3.
When I attempt to retreive email it fails with an error.

My setup is as follows:

NOTE: I have changed the public IP's for security but the sequence is the same.
SBS 2003 LAN        IP=10.0.0.2 / SM=255.255.255.0
SBS 2003 WAN      IP=80.46.119.52 / SM=255.255.255.240
Router External      IP=80.46.119.50 / SM=255.255.255.240  (Assigned by the ISP as the gateway)
Router Internal      IP=80.46.119.51 / SM=255.255.255.250  (Next number along from the above gateway - same range)
Router Port Fwd    TCP Port 110 - forwarded to 80.46.119.52 (SBS WAN CARD)

If I attempt to collect email via OE and POP3 internally (on the LAN as a test) it works.
When I try it outside the company the following message is received by OE:

"The connection to the server has failed. Account: 'POP3TEST', Server: '80.46.119.50', Protocol: POP3, Port: 110, Secure(SSL): No, Socket Error: 10060, Error Number: 0x800CCC0E"

The interesting thing is that another installation that I have done works correctly, but not this one.

1) Any ideas on fixing this?
2) WHat is the best way to trace or diagnose this issue.
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support_realtime
Asked:
support_realtime
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1 Solution
 
SembeeCommented:
It seems like your client is trying to connect to the gateway address, not the port forwarded adress x.52
If you are entering the IP addresses (instead of DNS names) then I would look at changing to 52

Simon.
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support_realtimeAuthor Commented:
As I understand the POP3 client needs to be point to the routers public IP (in this case .50) as this then forwards POP3 traffic on port 110 to the mail server (.52)

So I beleive that this is correct - if I am wrong pls advise, however we have done this before and to this day it works okay.

80.46.119.52 is not accessible from the internet - only .50
The ISP is the same so there are no ISP related liiations either.

By the way the IP's above are not the true IP's for security reasons (but they are an accurate representation).
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SembeeCommented:
You have over complicated matters by using the same IP range on both sides of the router. A router is supposed to route between subnets - so if you have the same subnet things get very complicated.  

Did you subnet it down, or was that provided by the ISP?

Personally I wouldn't dual home the server unless it is also acting as the gateway. If that is the case then configure the router to send all traffic to the server and then configure the required IP addresses on the server.

Simon.
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support_realtimeAuthor Commented:
So you would use one NIC on the server?
If I do the following would this be right...

SBS 2003 LAN        IP=10.0.0.2 / SM=255.255.255.0
Router External      IP=80.46.119.50 / SM=255.255.255.240  (Assigned by the ISP as the gateway)
Router Internal      IP=10.0.0.3 / SM=255.255.255.0
Router Port Fwd    TCP Port 110 - forwarded to 10.0.0.2 (SBS LAN CARD)

Does this look right and is it secure?

Thanks
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SembeeCommented:
I don't know what spec your router is - whether it is just a router or one of these firewall combo devices.
If it is the latter then it should be secure.

Only thing I would change from an aesthetics point of view is the internal IP address on the router. I would make it either 10.0.0.1 or 10.0.0.254 - the latter being my preference. It means that your gateway isn't stuck in the middle of the range.

Otherwise it looks fine.

Simon.
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