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Upgraded monitor without changing refresh rates

Hey all, I have a problem here.  I'm running Fedora Core 2 (don't laugh at me :P), and I upgraded from a CRT monitor running at 85 hertz refresh, to an LCD (Sony SDMHS74-P) monitor that has a maximum refresh of 75 hertz.  The problem is, whenever it goes into the login screen, of course my monitor cuts out because it wants to try displaying at 85 hertz and it's out of the range of this particular monitor.

I tried "upgrading" my Fedora installation with the disks, hoping it would detect that change and modify it, but it didn't do a thing.  How can I tell Linux that my monitor is no longer a CRT 17 inch but an LCD 17 inch with different refresh rates necessarry?
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Jezuit
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Jezuit
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1 Solution
 
jlevieCommented:
The first thing to try is to log in as root an an alternate console (Ctrl-Alt-F2)  and use system-config-display to set up X for this monitor. That should work, but in some cases the monitor may not work when presented with an out of range signal from X.

If you can't get into an alternate console  because the display is locked up you'll need to boot into single user mode by appending " single" (note the leading space) to the kernel spec on the Grub boot screen. Then execute 'telinit 3' (or edit /etc/inittab and set "id:3:initdefault:") and reboot. The system will then come up in text mode and you can set up X. From text mode you can start the Desktop with 'startx' to make sure it works. Then if you want, you can revert to the Gui login by executing 'telinit 5'  (or edit /etc/inittab and set "id:5:initdefault:")
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JezuitAuthor Commented:
Ctrl+Alt+F2 worked actually, and was allowing me to login in text mode.  I logged in as root and started up 'system-config-display' at which point it promptly went back to having an out of range signal.  When you say 'The system will then come up in text mode and you can set up X'... how will I proceed to actually set up X at that point?
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JezuitAuthor Commented:
Never mind.  I was able to change the xorg.conf file (which I had to read up about, I had no clue about it :P), and set the refresh rates manually for my monitor.  Thanks for the help.
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jlevieCommented:
Sometimes the approach you used (editing xorg.conf) is the only way to get things working.
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