• Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 219
  • Last Modified:

500pts: Label Design: Alighing printable fields on printer?

Hi there,

I am just creating a label, its a simple label that has 3 fields that need to be printed on at a later stage.

I will be passing the label to a professional print house to produce the labels, currently i believe that they will be 3 labels across and 14 down on 1 A4 paper.

My question being is that where should i put the fields on the label, i.e. Do inkjet printers print each 1cm down the page or it doesn't matter? Because when the labels are produced i will be printing on the labels using an inkjet printer and filling in the fields..

Ermm, let me see if i can explain better, in simple terms if the first field starts 1 cm down the first label and then second field is some silly number like 1.33 cm after the first field... will home printers have a problem printing in specific positions remebering that the labels will be on a sheet of A4 so as the printer progresses down the page is it going to slowly go out of line.. i.e. label 2 is ok, label 3 is move .001 cm .. label 3 is moved .003 cm etc.

I am designing the labels in photoshop, but will be only designing 1 .. and the professional print house will be placing them on the a4 before doing a large print run of the labels..

Hope someone can help

Ian
0
ianinspain
Asked:
ianinspain
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
2 Solutions
 
lherrouCommented:
Ian,

What program will YOU be using to print the data onto the 'finished' labels? Many programs, and especially Microsoft programs like Word, Excel and Access, have the capability to print labels in both standard formats (such as Avery brand labels) and in user-defined formats. This ensures that each label is printed in the printable area designated for the label and the printer creep you describe won't happen.
0
 
webwomanCommented:
I would find out from THEM how they want the labels.

And I'd be willing to bet they don't want 'labels' at all -- they will most likely want just the data. They may want Excel, they may want a comma-separated flat (text) file.

But it's highly unlikely they're going to want 'labels'. They may not even use the same type of printer or labels that you have. Often they don't.
0
 
webwomanCommented:
Let me add a little more detail...

If you're using Photoshop to design the PRINTED address on the labels, stop right now. That's NOT what they're going to want. If you're designing a LOGO, do that, and forget trying to design how the address on the label is going to look. The print house will want the logo/design (ONE, not a whole sheet) AND the names/addresses, and THEY'LL set it up. Again, THEY know how their presses/label stock works, YOU don't.

What YOU need is the FINISHED label size and the text area they want to have for the printed text. You do NOT want to put any text on it (other than maybe a return address). THEY will do that.

And frankly, Pshop really isn't the best tool to use. You'd get better results with Illustrator. You can DO it in Pshop, of course, but you may wind up with fuzzy edges on your text.

Now, when you get the labels BACK from them, you'll need to use something else to print the addresses. Word would be my choice. You'll need to set up a custom mailmerge template for your label document. That's another thing entirely.
0
Never miss a deadline with monday.com

The revolutionary project management tool is here!   Plan visually with a single glance and make sure your projects get done.

 
ianinspainAuthor Commented:
Hi there,

thanks for the replies.

Yes I will be using Microsoft Word to "fill in the blanks" on the labels.

Actually I am designing in Photoshop but have since moved to illustrator but saying that, I have antialias on all text so it should be ok. I have designed many things before and they have also come out ok.

My concern was the printer CREEP, as i wasn't sure HOW microsoft word for example would handle the printer creep problem. I mean I know it supports increasing printing each label down the page but wasn't too sure if i have to use a value to creep and what value it must be.

For example. if I can user definable CREEP! that I could creep down 3.134 each label.. great! But i wasn't sure if microsoft word supports numbers like this or it has to be like this 3, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4, 3.5 i.e. no in between numbers.

I hope i made myself clear.

Thanks

Ian
0
 
ianinspainAuthor Commented:
More info.. The labels are for sticking to the front of a monitor, it is for computers of my clients who have installed REMOTE SUPPORT i.e. I give them support remotely using pcanywhere.

The label is to stick to the monitor and it will contain my small logo and the following info

PC ID :  The id of this PC ... used internally by me.
TP: The tcpip port number
UP: the udp port number

I thought this may help understand why i need a label and what its use will be for.

Ian
0
 
lherrouCommented:
Ian,

Yes. In Microsoft Word, you can define the exact size of the labels and of the printing area of the labels. Here's Microsoft's methods for doing so: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/142965/EN-US/. The default measurement for the layout of labels is Points, with "Point" being a unit of measurement used in typography that is equal to 1/72 inch. I suspect that this is the maximum level of precision for printing the labels, not thousands of an inch.
0
 
webwomanCommented:
Labels never print perfectly. Don't expect them to. Paper shifts, doesn't feed exactly correctly, etc., etc., Don't design your labels to be exactly in the label area, leave a little margin. Then if it doesn't align exactly, it's not as big a deal.

You'll need to run a few sheets with just the logo and/or dummy text to see if they're aligned right. Then you adjust the print margins as necessary.
0
 
ianinspainAuthor Commented:
thanks everyone.. much appreciated

0

Featured Post

The new generation of project management tools

With monday.com’s project management tool, you can see what everyone on your team is working in a single glance. Its intuitive dashboards are customizable, so you can create systems that work for you.

  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now