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Exchange and Small Business Server 2003

Need some assistance here… I will be installing and configuring a SBS 2003 server.  It will primarily be used for file and Exchange services.  However, my client will continue to use their ISP (for now) to receive Internet email, but want to use Exchange for internal email only.  

With previous installations of SBS 2000, I configured incoming and outgoing email.  However, this client doesn’t want that at this time.  Therefore, my question is, how do I configure Exchange to only allow internal email and not to send e-mail to the Internet?  

Thanks!
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karden444
Asked:
karden444
1 Solution
 
Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
I'm not sure you can disable SENDING of e-mail.  You can configure the POP3 Connector to download e-mail from the ISP though, so you can continue to use the ISP.
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ccomleyCommented:
You can disable sending of email by tinkering with the Virtual SMTP Server. As I've never tried to achieve this specific result, I can't help with the combination of configs you should be aiming for but that's where I'd be looking! :-)

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Jeffrey Kane - TechSoEasyPrincipal ConsultantCommented:
SBS2003 handles this situation quite easily (although make sure that you have installed ALL updates and patches after your install -- especially after applying SP1 for Exchange -- see http://sbslinks.com/patch.htm for complete details).

Then, when you run the Email and Internet Connection Wizard as part of your To-Do list immediately following installation, you will be prompted for how to handle email.  

On the following wizard screens, select the item I've noted...

Internet Email: Enable Internet Email
Delivery Method: Forward all email to the email server at your ISP (this is referred to later as your Smarthost)
Retrieval Method:  Use the Microsoft Connector for POP3 Mailboxes

That's all there is to it.

Jeff @
TechSoEasy

P.S.  Tinkering with any item on an SBS is not usually a good idea... the wizards usually handle most all standard needs and should be tried first in all cases.
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karden444Author Commented:
The server is on order and I should have it in a week or two.  At that time, I will try the suggestions mentioned here.
Thanks, I'll let you know how it goes.
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Jeffrey Kane - TechSoEasyPrincipal ConsultantCommented:
Ah... you haven't started yet... if you haven't installed an SBS before, please take a look at http:Q_21031607.html for the links and tips I've noted there.  You should really consider getting  the Best Practices book (http://www.smbnation.com) and following it as closely as possible... by keeping to the recommended initial configuration, you will have no problems with your install, and if you do... there's lots of support in the SBS communities.

Good Luck!

Jeff @
TechSoEasy
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karden444Author Commented:
I have installed SBS 2000 before and 2003 once.  However, previously, I have just used the defaults and have had no problems.  Thank you for the resources, I will be sure to check them out.
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Jeffrey Kane - TechSoEasyPrincipal ConsultantCommented:
No problem.  FYI, here's a great how-to with screen shots for the CEICW (Configure Email and Internet Connection Wizard) settings  I was referring to -- http://www.sbs-rocks.com/sbs2k3/sbs2k3-n2.htm

Also, I reread your question and understanding that the client wants mainly "file and Exchange services" be sure to check out SharePoint... it's the ULTIMATE way for users to combine these services in a very usable and easy to get started with environment.  http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/assistance/CH011593601033.aspx

It's included with SBS2003, and one of the things my clients love the most!

Jeff @
TechSoEasy
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karden444Author Commented:
Your links have been very helpful.  I had trouble turning off Internet e-mail, however, this turns out not to be such a problem as my client likes the fact that he can receive Performance Reports to his home e-mail address.  I'm sure I'll expand SBS more as my client understands all it can do for him.
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Jeffrey Kane - TechSoEasyPrincipal ConsultantCommented:
Terrific!  It doesn't really make sense to disable the ability to send email through the Internet... one of the great values of SBS is the ability for small businesses to increase their communication with their customers... there are all sorts of materials which support the reasoning behind this...

Put this in front of your client and see what he thinks:  http://download.microsoft.com/download/1/9/9/19965e37-b219-4196-9ed7-a8d36227c5bb/WindowsSBS2003-businessvaluewhitepaper.doc

This is also a good publication to help business owners understand the value of having a server based network:  http://download.microsoft.com/download/7/1/F/71F71D86-71F9-43D5-99F1-F004C8F56A29/network_guide.pdf

Good Luck!

Jeff
TechSoEasy
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karden444Author Commented:
More links!  Thank you.

Here are the issues with Internet e-mail:
- He has a DSL connection with a DHCP address, not static.  He doesn’t have DDNS, and my experience in the past has been that this doesn’t work very well as many e-mail servers will reject e-mail from a dynamic IP address.
-He doesn’t want to open up the firewall and expose his network to the public Internet in any way.  However, now he’s thinking about VPN, so I may have to open up his firewall in the future.

My client had a peer-to-peer network for the past few years, and I have finally been able to get him to upgrade.  He’s very happy with SBS and his new equipment.  Now he wants to expand it.  My goal is to give him new ideas and expand his SBS implementation.
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Jeffrey Kane - TechSoEasyPrincipal ConsultantCommented:
Well, then you get a few more links:
http://blogs.msdn.com/canthe/archive/2005/01/06/348110.aspx
This is recommended by an SBS MVP (from http://sbs-rocks.com) http://www.directupdate.net/

Unless you have a router such as a D-Link 624 (which has DDNS support).  You are right though that servers will reject mail from a dynamic IP address (even if it sticks forever to the MAC address ... it's based on IP ranges).

And your last link?  http://sbslinks.com that should give you a good place to go from.

Jeff
TechSoEasy
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