?
Solved

2 Hard Disk, 2 OS, Is it possible to Access Both OS?

Posted on 2005-03-24
15
Medium Priority
?
2,364 Views
Last Modified: 2012-06-21
Hi Guys!

I have two hard disk.  Each Hard disk have an OS install:

First hard Disk (Master) = Windows XP Pro, NTFS, (DISK 0), BASIC, C:
Second Hard Disk (Slave) = Windows ME, Fat 32, (DISK 1), BASIC, F:

I have tried to change my boot.ini but I'm unable to start my Windows ME???

multi(0),disk(0),rdisk(0),partition(1)\windows "Windows XP Pro" /fastdetect
multi(0),disk(0),rdisk(1),partition(1)\windows "Windows ME" /fastdetect
Any idea?

Thanks!

0
Comment
Question by:polycorjsp
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
  • 5
  • 2
  • 2
  • +6
15 Comments
 
LVL 20

Expert Comment

by:Lazarus
ID: 13627916
polycorjsp,

Computers that have Windows 95, 98 (or Windows Me) and Windows XP:

* Windows 95, 98 or Windows Me must be installed on a basic disk on a partition formatted with FAT or FAT32. If Windows 98 or Windows Me is not installed on the system partition, which is almost always the first partition on the disk, the system partition must also be formatted with FAT or FAT32. (For Windows 95 OSR2, FAT32 may be used.) If Windows 95 is not installed on the system partition, which is almost always the first partition on the disk, the system partition must also be formatted with FAT (or FAT32 for Windows 95 OSR2).

* Compressed DriveSpace or DoubleSpace volumes won’t be available while you are running Windows XP. It is not necessary to uncompress DriveSpace or DoubleSpace volumes that you will access only with Windows 98.

* Remember Windows XP must be installed last. Otherwise important files needed for starting Windows XP could be overwritten.


Lazarus
0
 

Author Comment

by:polycorjsp
ID: 13627930
Since they are on two different Hard disk; does it matter?
0
 
LVL 20

Expert Comment

by:Lazarus
ID: 13627938
Sorry I missed your Boot.ini It should be:

multi(0),disk(0),rdisk(0),partition(1)\windows "Windows XP Pro" /fastdetect
multi(0),disk(1),rdisk(0),partition(1)\windows "Windows ME" /fastdetect


Which hard disk will be used?

rdisk(0)
The next part of the naming convention will always be rdisk, as it provides the node address of this disk on the controller.
Only SCSI controllers have multiple nodes, therefore for a true multi (IDE or similar) controller, the number here will always be zero (0) . When a SCSI controller is involved, this number will be the SCSI ID number of the designated boot disk on that controller. Early SCSI controllers used SCSI ID numbers from 0 to 7, with ID# 0 (zero) normally reserved for the boot drive's address and ID# 7 reserved for the SCSI controller itself. You may want to make a mental note here that you can boot to any of the first 7 SCSI ID numbers: 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6.

Some of the SCSI controllers that have been manufactured over the last few years may have as many as 15 SCSI ID's, but again, ID# 0 (zero) is still reserved for the boot drive, and ID# 7 is still reserved for the controller. These SCSI ID's identify the disk's address on the SCSI controllers chain.

Remember that a ROM BIOS-enabled SCSI controller will show up in BOOT.INI as multi. This would mean that you would see a name beginning with multi(0)rdisk(3) in the ARC string. From what you have learned thus far, you now know that this couldn't be an IDE drive, therefore it must be a disk at SCSI ID #3 of a SCSI controller with its ROM BIOS enabled. This is an issue that has escaped most of Microsoft's early certification tests for Windows NT, and even today the issue isn't well documented.

Where is the hard disk located?

disk(0)
The third part of the name, disk(0), identifies which disk, at the node address specified under rdisk. Here, the boot hard drive on the SCSI controller must be zero (0), since only IDE and related controllers support master/slave disk configurations. The hard drive configured as a master on an IDE controller will be disk(0) and the hard drive configured on the same IDE bus as a slave will be disk(1). On a dual-channel EIDE controller, this number could be anything from 0 to 3, and today with the number of specialty motherboards with dual IDE/EIDE controllers, as well as the number of add-on controllers with interfaces for several IDE/EIDE drives, this number can be as high as 7.

Which partition will be used?

partition(1)
To understand the fourth part of the ARC naming convention, you must first understand the Intel partitioning scheme. In current versions of MS-DOS, Windows 95/98, Windows NT and Windows 2000, a disk may have up to four separate partitions. One of these partitions, and only one, may be an extended partition. Any others must be primary partitions. A primary partition equates to a single drive letter, as an example, drive (or partition) for example C:, which must be located in a primary partition. The extended partition issue dates back to the time, under earlier versions of DOS or MS-DOS, when a disk could have only one primary partition. To allow better division of available disk space, the extended partition was developed.

0
WordPress Tutorial 2: Terminology

An important part of learning any new piece of software is understanding the terminology it uses. Thankfully WordPress uses fairly simple names for everything that make it easy to start using the software.

 
LVL 20

Assisted Solution

by:Lazarus
Lazarus earned 300 total points
ID: 13627950
Look at this link, it might help: http://www.dewassoc.com/kbase/multiboot/boot_ini.htm
0
 

Author Comment

by:polycorjsp
ID: 13627996
Still dosen't work...

I think that the problem is that I did it all wrong...

I remove the Windows ME HD and insert a new one.  I've done a clean installation of Windows XP pro.  Then, I re-insert the Windows ME HD, Place the jumper to Slave and boot the system.  My Windows XP found a new hardward and gave it the F: Driver letter...

I've heard that some software exist to resolve my issue...  Do you know any?

Thanks!
0
 
LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:likeachild
ID: 13628012
go into BIOS and enable "boot from other devices"
if you still can't use the other OS, download Microsoft Virtual PC, and "use harddrive as virtual PC" then you can boot your other OS
0
 
LVL 20

Expert Comment

by:Lazarus
ID: 13628026
You don't need any other software, you just need to install XP after Win ME. Preferably install ME on dosk 0 then XP on Disk 1
0
 

Expert Comment

by:Umapathyxp
ID: 13628147
As you have 2 HDD you need to change the boot sequence in the bios. Then when you need the other other operating system again you need to change the bootsequence in the bios. You need not to edit anything on boot.ini (If you have editited it just restore it). You may skip the following steps (editing boot.ini).

[boot loader]
timeout=30
default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS
[operating systems]
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP Professional" /noexecute=optin /fastdetect
0
 
LVL 96

Expert Comment

by:Lee W, MVP
ID: 13628152
Actually, of pre NT OSs your boot.ini should look like this:
multi(0),disk(0),rdisk(0),partition(1)\windows="Windows XP Pro" /fastdetect
F:\="Windows ME"
0
 
LVL 2

Assisted Solution

by:kasper2003
kasper2003 earned 300 total points
ID: 13628198
Try Gag. it is a free program will give you a graphical user interface to select which windows you want to boot and it will autodetect every bootable os on your system automagically...
0
 
LVL 2

Expert Comment

by:kasper2003
ID: 13628200
forgot to post a link to gag. here it is
http://sourceforge.net/projects/gag/
0
 
LVL 20

Expert Comment

by:Lazarus
ID: 13628238
Follow this link to MS: http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/using/setup/learnmore/multiboot.mspx
It will tell you exactly how it should be done.

You don't have to worry about writing the Boot.ini if you install XP last, it needs to write the boot.ini anyways to do it properly.

You can learn alot about Dual Booting from this website: http://thpc.info/dual/dualxp2kon9x.html

Leew's suggestion is also correct on the pre NT systems boot.ini, I've seen them both work though. but you should opt with letting XP build it's own boot.ini either way

Also use the command prompt: type

bootcfg /rebuild

This will scan your hard drives and rebuild the boot.ini for you properly from XP

It should look something like this:

[boot loader]
timeout=30
default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(1)partition(1)\WINDOWS
[operating systems]
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(1)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP Professional" /fastdetect
C:\="Microsoft ME"
0
 
LVL 15

Accepted Solution

by:
davidis99 earned 300 total points
ID: 13629330
The problem you're having isn't with the boot.ini file, it's with the boot sector of the drive running Windows ME.   The proper way to do this dual boot setup would have been to leave the Windows ME drive in the PC, add the second drive, then install XP onto the second drive, which would allow XP to modify the boot sector on drive one while being installed to drive two.  By removing drive one when performing the install to drive two, you disabled XP's ability to modify the boot sector of the Windows ME drive, which would have allowed it to continue to work after the XP install.  Your only options at this point are to 1) use a third party boot loader, which should recognize both OSes, or 2) return the Windows ME drive to its position as primary drive, wipe the XP drive, make it secondary (or primary on the other channel), then reinstall XP and allow XP to modify the WIndows ME drive properly.
0
 
LVL 12

Assisted Solution

by:kneH
kneH earned 300 total points
ID: 13629530
Or just get something like Bootmagic.
0
 
LVL 3

Assisted Solution

by:two22
two22 earned 300 total points
ID: 13630725
polycorjsp

Here is a good resource for information on multi-booting:

http://www.goodells.net/multiboot/

This might explain why you are having problems here under 'Multibooting Principles--Multibooting the Micorsoft Way':

http://www.goodells.net/multiboot/principles.htm

You should find out if your WinME will properly boot when placed in the 'slave' position on you IDE 1 controller.  If you were to 'hide' the boot partition of your WinXP installation, that might allow the boot process to 'see' the HDD in the slave position and continue the booting process into WinME.  If you have PartitionMagic, you can use a DOS boot disk to run 'pqboot.exe' or 'pqbootx.exe' to hide/unhide and make 'active' various OS's that are found.  Or you can use the full DOS PartitionMagic to do the same.  Also, make sure the WinME boot partition is active and unhidden.  There are other programs as well to do this.

If WinME will not boot in the 'slave' position, remove the WinXP HDD and put the WinME HDD in the 'master' position, make sure the partition is unhidden and active and make sure it boots okay there (it should--that's where you originally installed the OS--right?).

If WinME boots okay, then add back the WinXP HDD in the 'slave' position.  You will have to modify the WinXP boot.ini to point to the second HDD on IDE-1.  Hide the WinME partition, and make sure that the WinXP boot partition is unhidden and active.  Now, the WinXP OS should boot okay.

If WinXP now boots okay too, you now have a 'dual-boot' setup that's using the 'non-Micosoft way' of multi-booting by hiding and unhiding the boot partitons and making the OS you want to use as 'active'.

If you want to use the 'Microsoft Way', you're going to have to figure out how to get boot.ini to point to 'bootsect.dos' and how to create that file as well.  But, you may still have to have the WinME HDD as master on IDE-1 in order to allow it to boot.

Other third party boot managers can probably be used to control your setup.  Their documentation should explain any limitations on where different OS's have to be located on different HDD's and master/slave positions.
0

Featured Post

Independent Software Vendors: We Want Your Opinion

We value your feedback.

Take our survey and automatically be enter to win anyone of the following:
Yeti Cooler, Amazon eGift Card, and Movie eGift Card!

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Introduction How to create multiboot configuration with XP\Vista and Windows 7 on it? And most important question - how to do this correctly so not to have any kind of nightmares we get when system gets screwed? First of all one should realize t…
Windows 7 does not have the best desktop search built in. This is something Windows 7 users have struggled with. You type something in, and your search results don’t always match what you are looking for, or it doesn’t actually work at all. There ar…
This is used to tweak the memory usage for your computer, it is used for servers more so than workstations but just be careful editing registry settings as it may cause irreversible results. I hold no responsibility for anything you do to the regist…
Hi friends,  in this video  I'll show you how new windows 10 user can learn the using of windows 10. Thank you.

777 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question