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Decision help for choosing between two IBM monitors

I am deciding on the purchase between two IBM monitors.  I want the monitor for video editing.  Does anyone have any knowledge of these two monitors, or monitors with similar specs, in terms of "best" for video work - or, more specifically, best to the tune of $300 more for the better monitor.  Thanks for any thoughts.

The main differences are listed below.  Also, the 20 inch monitor is $300 more than the cost of the 19 inch monitor (close to double the cost).

IBM ThinkVision L200p Monitor
    * 20.1-inch viewable image area
    * Native resolution 1600 x 1200
    * Automatically scales resolutions less than 1600 x 1200
Contrast Ratio            400:1
Maximum Vertical Refresh Rate            85 Hz
      
IBM ThinkVision L190 Monitor
    * 19-inch (482-mm) viewable image size
    * Native resolution:  1280 x 1024
    * Scaling for viewing of full-page images of resolutions less than 1280 x 1024
Contrast Ratio            500:1
Maximum Vertical Refresh Rate            76 Hz

They both seem similar in the following ways:
Both have the same brightness            250cd/m2
Both have comparable minimal horizontal refresh rate
Both have comparable slowest vertical refresh rate
The  L200P has "automatic scaling of lower resolutions" and the L190 has "scaling" - perhas they are the same.
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cornell256
Asked:
cornell256
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4 Solutions
 
-Leo-Commented:
I have L200P in the office for CAD applications and its outstanding! Native resolution of 1600x1200 and 85 Hz  refresh rate does a lot for picture quality. But, you should consider your budget as $300 - significant price difference.
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nobusCommented:
i think it depends on what kind of video editing you want to do :
-if you need the clear sharp details to work on, the IBM ThinkVision L200p Monitor is your choice
- if you only need to use it for a global view, cutting and pasting in the stream, i think both can suit your needs.
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WatzmanCommented:

First, I doubt that you will get a 20" monitor for $300.

If you have a DVI port on your video card (that's a digital interface port), I'd look for a monitor that can use it, the image may be significnatly better.

Beyond that, it's almost impossible to evaluate monitors even with very detailed specs, but not seeing the monitors actually operating and connected to the target systems.  In terms of the specs, the big difference is resolution, 1600x1200 vs. 1280x1024.  Is that a difference that is important to you?  Video editing is not a particularly demanding application as far as monitors and video cards go.  Response time can be an issue if there is a lot of fast action on the screen, but in this case the response time of the two is given as comparable anyway.
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cornell256Author Commented:
Thanks for all the comments.  

One of the conceptual problems I have is with the resolution difference, and what that would mean in a video editing application.  I want to have lots of windows on the screen (the different toolboxes, the timeline, the monitor window(s), etc.) and I want the monitor(s) to be large, and I don't want any overlapping windows.  I am currently using a Samsung TV as my monitor, it is 17" widescreen, and the windows overlap which is quite inefficient.  However, I think the 19" will be large enough, and so will the 20".

Any thoughts about what this difference in resolution means in this context?  That's perhaps the basis I'll make a choice upon.  Plus, the comment by a "real user" ie. -Leo- is very comforting - that the 20" is beautiful.

The 20" monitor is not $300 cost, it is a $300 differential (that is, it is $300 more than the 19" monitor) so I am trying to decide if what I get for that $300 is worth the extra money.

Thanks for any comments about resolution, and I'll report back about what I finally decide to do.  I'm editing HD video, and I need to explore additional issues related to HD (but that's another question, unless anyone has any comments about that here!).

Thanks again.
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cornell256Author Commented:
Both of these monitors have a digital interface, and that is definitely important.
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WatzmanCommented:
The higher resolution is going to make things smaller.  There isn't much of a difference in surface area between a 19" and 20" monitor, but because of the resolution difference, things on the 20" monitor are going to be a lot smaller unless you resize them (lets say that things taking the same number of pixels will be a lot smaller).  That's both good and bad -- it means you can get a lot more windows on the screen, for sure -- but everything in those windows will be small, and possibly (unless you scale things up) uncomfortably small.  However, you may need that space for HD video.
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cornell256Author Commented:
Thanks for the comments.  I'll report back to this forum what I decide to do, and will wait a few days before closing the question in case anyone else adds anything.  
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J-A-LCommented:
Seems as though you may be paying for an IBM name... I would possibly check around and see if 20" monitors are available elsewhere and cheaper.  1600x1200 is definately nice real estate.  I have a 20" wide screen at home and the larger formats are really nice to stare at ;-)  **ahem, no one brags about having 19" anymore..lol**
So how much is the 19" monitor?  Also, you'll want to make sure your video card can comfortably do 1600x1200 if you chose that route.  I spent a big chunk of money on a Dell 2005FPW... but it was worth it.

Jeff
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cornell256Author Commented:
Thanks so much for comments.  I'm out of town, but will focus on all of this soon!
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J-A-LCommented:
Also, a good 19" CRT monitor should be able to do 1600x1200 also... so you may want to check around more for a good quality 19"

http://www.tigerdirect.ca/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=705815&CatId=169

for example... and cheaper too.

Jeff
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cornell256Author Commented:
Thanks for all the comments.  I am going to close the question and assign some points to every answer since everyone brought something useful to the table.  I don't know what I will do but have this as a guide when I focus on a purchase.
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