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PC wont reboot

HI

When im trying to reboot my machine it fails. It shut downs and the monitor turns off. I expect the monitor to turn on after a few seconds but nothing happens. The coolers just keep running but nothing happens. I will have to turn off the power and keep it that way for 5 minutes before i can start it up again. Just updated my BIOS and re installed XP and neither of these helped.

Anyone have an idea or experienced the same ?
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jaydb
Asked:
jaydb
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2 Solutions
 
burrcmCommented:
Does it shutdown during use then need a rest before restarting? If so it is overheating. Check the CPU heatsink for dust clog, and ensure the fans are spinning freely.

Chris B
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jaydbAuthor Commented:
It works fine for several hours(even days), its only when i press restart (after some installation) that it does it.
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Gary GordonSolution IntegratorCommented:
I would check the CPU heatsink as advised by burrcm.  After that I would take a look at the powersupply.  I'm also concerned that your reset case switch may be getting cought on the case, i.e. the button may remain depressed for an indefinite time after using it.  Consider disconnecting the reset button case switch cable from the motherboard and see if the problem persists.  Also check/replace CMOS battery.  
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burrcmCommented:
After an installation (or anything else) you should not press the reset button, you should click Start, Shutdown, Restart. Pressing the reset button can damage files and may cause problems restarting.

Chris B
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egandpCommented:
Pressing the restart button should give Windows the command to initiate a shutdown, followed by a restart, that is, when you press the button Windows displays 'Windows is now shutting down'. This is the O/S saving any work left over (left over from what's called 'lazy writes'). If the PC goes down immediatly after pressing restart ( I assume you have a button on your PC case?) without any such message on screen, then you have a hardware restart button - kind of works by interrupting the power supply. This type of restart does leave the PC vulnerable to losing information left over from lazy writes (this is when you save some work, and the PC says it has saved, but in fact it hasn't, it will wait for some spare CPU clock cycles to do so instead). In either case, I reckon you need to have a look at two areas relating to this problem. The first is in the BIOS, under power management. Look for a setting which indicates the type of power management being used - as in the sleep level (S1 through S6 - higher number indicate a 'deeper sleep'). If it's set to S1, when your PC goes to standy, hardware devices are issued a command to go in to a light state of power saving mode. If S3 has been set in the BIOS, the hardware is issued a command to go in to a deeper level of sleep, and to use even less power. S6 is the deepest level of sleep, with the greatest power savings. It is sometimes a problem that too deep a level is set in the BIOS, and badly written drivers may not be supported fully, hence the PC gets problems when anything other that a plain 'shutdown' command is issued. Try getting the latest drivers for all your hardware, or set a lower spleep level in the BIOS (S1 instead of S3 for example)
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jaydbAuthor Commented:
Thanks to all so far.
I forgot to mention that my reset button is disabled. It happens when i press Start -> Shutdown -> Restart. Will soon test some of the suggestions.
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egandpCommented:
If its restart from the shutdown menu (as you say), then have a look for the sleep level as mentioned above (look in the BIOS). If it's at S3 or similar now, try lowering it to S1, this will make it easier for your hardware to comply with the restart command Windows is giving out.
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jaydbAuthor Commented:
I had another power supply and it worked much better. It was already set to S1 but now i understand what means. Thanks to all for feedback.
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