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Gentoo Console Scrolling

Posted on 2005-04-03
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Last Modified: 2008-03-17
Hi, very simple question.  Just wondering what button I use/how I can preferably scroll up through a console session because i'm missing the text on boot; otherwise does the bootup information output to a text file somewhere?
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Question by:mortar
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10 Comments
 
LVL 3

Expert Comment

by:mike_mian
ID: 13695045
look in /var/log/bootlog to see boot log messages
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LVL 5

Assisted Solution

by:Anonymouslemming
Anonymouslemming earned 300 total points
ID: 13696932
you can also type dmesg after boot, but the output of this is overwritten over time.
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LVL 4

Author Comment

by:mortar
ID: 13702335
Hi mike_mian.  That file doesn't seem to exist.. Any ideas?

dmesg works good Anonymouslemming.. Do you know how long it takes to get overwritten or is it just a matter of data?

So there's just no way that you can simply scroll back up through a console session? Once it's disappeared on the screen, it's lost unless it's been logged?
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LVL 38

Expert Comment

by:wesly_chen
ID: 13703194
> So there's just no way that you can simply scroll back up through a console session?
No, no way.

dmesg command kernel ring buffer, by default, it is 16K and it's also written into the /var/log/dmesg.
This file will regenerate everytime you reboot. Or it will be overwirtten when it grows bigger than 16KB,
I mean the old message will be pushed out by the new messages.

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LVL 38

Expert Comment

by:wesly_chen
ID: 13703210
For the boot messages history, they are in /var/log/boot.log.X (X stands for 1, 2, 3, 4)
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LVL 3

Expert Comment

by:mike_mian
ID: 13703990
sorry I miss-typed

should have been /var/opt/boot.log

see wesly's answer re dmesg
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LVL 4

Author Comment

by:mortar
ID: 13737295
wesly_chen: that file doesn't seem to exist.. There's xorg files but no boot files in that folder?
mike_mian: that file doesn't exist either.  Anywhere else it could be?
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LVL 38

Expert Comment

by:wesly_chen
ID: 13737385
How about /var/log/boot.msg?
Could you post /etc/syslog.conf  for the location of the log files?
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LVL 1

Accepted Solution

by:
arosboro earned 700 total points
ID: 13775932
are you looking for something like Shift + PageUp ?  This will let you see what ran off the screen in any of the virtual consoles.  I don't know if it goes back to dmesg stuff though, it may have a limit like a buffer to how far back it can read.
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LVL 4

Author Comment

by:mortar
ID: 13778386
wesly_chen: neither of those exist either.

the closest thing to syslog.conf was sysctl.conf which only seems to have a few lines of networking stuff...

arosboro: Thanks that might be it, when i'm home next i'll try it and post the results.
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