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Protect Shared Folder Hosting Shared Database

Hello,

I have a database I put in a shared folder on my XP pro machine.  I have 2+ users of the database.  I recently secured the Access 2003 database within Access to restrict deleting tables etc., but the users could still navigate to the shared folder and delete the entire database!

How can I restrict ability to delete files within the shared folder, but also allow access to the database across the network?  

Thanks
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onestopfinancial
Asked:
onestopfinancial
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2 Solutions
 
luv2smileCommented:
You need to right click the folder, properties, then go to the security tab and change the NTFS permissions. NTFS permissions are what control access to all files/folders in windows and they also control what type of access a user has.

You'll see a list of users/groups that are allowed to access the file. Here you can give users read only access, modify, etc. If you want to allow them to read and write, but not delete then you'll need to click on the advanced button and then edit for the user you wish to edit. Then you can change individual rights....to take away the ability to delete then you'd want to uncheck allow for "delete" and "delete subfolders and files".

If you don't see a security tab then you need to disable simple file sharing.

From windows explorer, go to tools- folder options- view tab

go down to the bottom and uncheck "use simple file sharing"
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onestopfinancialAuthor Commented:
in the Security tab, the location is greyed out, it only allow sme to search for users on my machine
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onestopfinancialAuthor Commented:
i only see 3 groups....Administrator, Administrators & System, when I click Add, the top two entries are greyed out.....
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Phil_AgcaoiliCommented:
Are you using an NTFS file system?  It would be greyed out only if you weren't.

As for the groups, that's normal.
As luv2smile mentioned, you can set individual access rights per user  to the files and subfolders you are looking to limit access to.

Here are some links to configure Access 2003 permissions:

Overview of Access security (MDB)-
http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/assistance/HP051882261033.aspx

About distributing a security-enhanced application (MDB)-
http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/assistance/HP051882541033.aspx

Types of permissions (MDB)-
http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/assistance/HP051885941033.aspx

Making an Access File More Secure-
http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/assistance/CH062526741033.aspx

Manage user and group accounts (MDB)-
http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/assistance/HP052578551033.aspx

About user-level security (MDB)-
http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/assistance/HP030704101033.aspx

Remove user-level security (MDB)-
http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/assistance/HP051882401033.aspx

Let us know if you need more info.  Start with NTFS and then use these guides to lock down user permissions.
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luv2smileCommented:
I assume this is a workgroup and not a domain?   If so then that is why your location is only your computer.

Manually add in the user names from the other machines and set their rights.

If you don't want the users to get a password prompt when accessing the share then you will need to add user accounts to your computer with the same name and password as exist on the other computers.
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onestopfinancialAuthor Commented:
how do i know if im using NTFS file system?  phil...under the Security tab (right clicking the folder) if I click Add under User Names/Groups, the top two options are greyed out and when I click Locations it only shows my computer
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onestopfinancialAuthor Commented:
i just right clicked the C: drive and it said NTFS file system
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Phil_AgcaoiliCommented:
Bring up File Explorer.
Select the drive where your database is located
Right mouse click-->Properties
File System...

It should say NTFS if you want to secure your database.
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onestopfinancialAuthor Commented:
it says NTFS....i added the 2 users to my machine and to the Security tab....how can i add the 2 users to a group so that i can assign the permissions to the group (in case i need to add more users or change permissions for everyone in the group)
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Phil_AgcaoiliCommented:
You need to create new groups.

Start-->Settings-->Control Panel-->Administrative Tools-->Computer Management
Local Users and Groups
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onestopfinancialAuthor Commented:
thanks Phil for your last comment....

when the user's computer was logged in as an administrator, the error message i got when trying to open the database was that the file could not be locked, but when i logged into windows using the new username and tried to open the database it said doesnt have permissions.

i setup the user within Access and Windows with the exact usernames and passwords.  why doesn't Access prompt for username and password when logged in under the new Windows user, but asks for the info when logged in as Windows administrator
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Phil_AgcaoiliCommented:
This is standard with Windows in general, the credentials of the person that are logged on to a machine are transferred to the application (such as Outlook and Exchange).  If the person is going to logon to the application with different credentials (especially if they are the only credentials allowed by that application), the authentication dialogue box appears.

Hope this helps.
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onestopfinancialAuthor Commented:
i don't understand....i guess i need to buy a server.....ill split the points between phil and luv...i appreciate your responses
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Phil_AgcaoiliCommented:
Maybe this helps.

No logon is required except for typical Windows authentication--
SystemA  SystemB  Application
User1      User1      User1

No logon is required from SystemA to B except for typical Windows authentication, but running Application will require UserC authentication--
SystemA  SystemB Application
User1      User1     UserC

Logon is required from SystemA to B, but Application will NOT require User2 authentication (no extra authentication to access the application)--
SystemA  SystemB Application
User1      User2     User2

There are a few more scenarios, but hopefully this has you down the right path.

Take care.
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onestopfinancialAuthor Commented:
phil, i appreciate you trying to help me understand this....

i would send someone a check for $50 if they can help me figure this out over the phone because posting back and forth on here isnt working

anyway, i appreciate everyones responses
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