Want to protect your cyber security and still get fast solutions? Ask a secure question today.Go Premium

x
  • Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 208
  • Last Modified:

How do I perform an upgrade of hard drive while maintaining all of my current files and programs>?

Hello,

     I was wondering if it is possible to upgrade my computer, which currently has a 20GB hard drive (19GB used) to a 120 GB hard drive. I am running windows 98 and will most likely continue to use that on the new hard drive. What I need to know is if this is possible. If it is, what is the easiest and most cost effective solution? This is my business computer and I would like to be able to keep all the programs in operating order. I would appreciate the help.
0
maskedarab
Asked:
maskedarab
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • +4
3 Solutions
 
maskedarabAuthor Commented:
I forgot to tell you. I do have moderate computer experience, so I am sure that I can handle anything you throw at me. Thank you.
0
 
cyberdevil67Commented:
Hi maskedarab,

    Your best bet is to invest in a program called ghost, attach the new HD ghost the partition to the new remove the old and make the new primary and away you go.

Cheers!
0
 
maskedarabAuthor Commented:
Allright, I actually have this program. So I wasnt too far off from where I need to be. The other question this brings to mind would be do I need to partition the new hard drive to match the old one in size for the primary partition or can I use the new hard drive with just one partition?
0
Concerto's Cloud Advisory Services

Want to avoid the missteps to gaining all the benefits of the cloud? Learn more about the different assessment options from our Cloud Advisory team.

 
wompeyCommented:
When you buy a harddrive, it will usually come with a floppy disk that will transfer everything for you (for free).  If there's no floppy, check the manufacturer's website.

As an example, Maxtor has something called MaxBlast.

The process usually involves hooking up the new harddrive, then running the software, then replacing the old HD with the new one.  It's usually pretty straightforward.  :)
0
 
cyberdevil67Commented:
maskedarab,

No you don't need to partition the HD, ghost will do everything you need first then you cal use a program called partition magic to resize or create more partitions later.
0
 
_Commented:
You need to make sure your BIOS will support a 120gig HD, before you get too far into this.
0
 
cyberdevil67Commented:
Yes that is true, you will need to check that your bios is supportive of the 120gig HD.

However you can go to the manufacturers website and get latest bios for the MB if need be, i did this awhile ago where the MB would not support the 120gig HD, but would if I used it as a secondary drive using it as a dynamic drive. But found the bios patch and reformated it to use basic drive and all was great.
0
 
_Commented:
If no BIOS upgrade, you should be able to use a PCI IDE addon card to run this drive.
Some system specs would help us know how to advise you better.
0
 
nobusCommented:
As Coral47 says, your bios must support it. If it does not, there are ways around, like a pci ata disc controller.
But since you are running windows 98, you would like to have the partitions not greater than 32 Gb, so you would have 4 of them.
0
 
gonzal13RetiredCommented:
I use a disc controller cards, actually two since I have several Hard drives as masters and do not like to partition the 80gig HDs

The controller cards cost about 27 dollars and is an easy installation.

It is my opinion that you should not partition your new HD since all it does is complicate the issue as to where to store data and where to install programs. Partitioning justs improves the access time on the hd and I think I really do not notice any difference.

I would not do a bios upgrade if you do not have good technical knowledge simply because one mistake and there goes the motherboard. Besides it is either the bios upgrade or the safer disk controller card.

Next, I would install the new HD as a master. Have the store check the jumpers on the back of the HD to insure it is set for a master.

Next look on top of your old HD and it should show you how to move the jumper to make it a slave. Next over a white cloth I would move the jumper. The reason to do it that way is that the jumper is so small that it is easy to drop it.

After installing your software etc, you can use the 20 gig HD to access your data. You can then remove all your programs from it.

Oh, I think that you should get a 100 gig HD, since some disk controller cards have a limitation of 120 gigs.

gonzal13(joe)

gonzal13(joe)
0
 
nobusCommented:
windows98 does not handle partitions larger than 32 Gb
0
 
gonzal13RetiredCommented:
nobus:
I do not have any of my HDs partiioned. All the HDs are fully recognized.

Joe
0
 
_Commented:
I have no problems with larger than 32gig partitions either. I did update FDISK for W98 so it showed the correct HD info over 64(?)gig
0
 
nobusCommented:
ok, maybe i'm talking about something different so please correct me here :
when i partitioned a 120 Gb disk on a XP system and choose FAT (for win98 recognition) it gave partition max size32 Gb
0
 
gonzal13RetiredCommented:
Nobus:

When I had that problem wher it would not recognize above 10 gigs, I add a 'Promise' HD controler card and it recognized the full size of the HD.
Joe
0
 
nobusCommented:
that i know, Joe, because you don't use the original bios settings anymore. It is a workaround this kind of problem.
I talk about a disc hooked up via ide or usb on a XP system

thanks anyway !
0
 
maskedarabAuthor Commented:
allright, I have a whole bunch of suggestions here. I have never done this procedure before, but I was fairly firm behing the thought that ghost would do this for me. I think I am going to go that route for now since I trust it seems to be the most efficient way for me to go at this point in time. I will let you know what happens in a day or so.

thanks up to this point.
0
 
_Commented:
>> partitioned a 120 Gb disk on a XP system and choose FAT << That is a bug with XP. W98 does not have that limit. If XP hasn't released a fix yet, use a W98 (ME) bootdisk to partition it. I think XP can format it OK, I can't remember for sure. (getting braindead alot lately)   : /
0
 
_Commented:
Ghost should do this fine.

If not, you can try one of these:


<Free>
I use this one:

Xclone

http://www.softlookup.com/download/down9372.html
http://www.simtel.net/welcome.php
ftp://ftp.mpi-sb.mpg.de/pub/simtelnet/win95/diskutl/xclone13.zip
http://www.softlookup.com/display.asp?ID=9372&RID=9212362&DID=4J58YURT


Slave new HD to old HD as said above, then run Xclone from a  DOS  prompt in windows: ( or START>RUN )

xclone c: d:  (or whichever letters you are using)  
It will copy everything but the swapfile ( which windows will recreate later ),
then make the new drive master and you are done. This is a freeware program and I use it to clone my HD before I do something new and/or stupid with my computer ( about every 2 or 3 weeks )      ; )    Don't forget to Fdisk and Format the new HD first.



RoboCopy. It's free from microsoft. Install and try it out. There's variables for output information on skipped files,etc.
http://www.ss64.com/nt/robocopy.html
http://www.ss64.com/nt/robocopyXP.html


<Not Free>

download a shareware version of Acronis here:
http://www.softpedia.com/public/cat/13/8/13-8-49.shtml


Casper
To read more about each program, just click on the prog icon at said page:
Casper XP v. 2.0 (Win NT-XP, $44.95)
Drive-2-Drive v. 2.0 (Win 9x-ME, $24.95)
Trial Download page: http://www.fssdev.com/products/free/

0
 
ViRoyCommented:

its pretty simple:
1) INSTALL the new 120gb HD first and format it so you have a driver letter ( most likely now the D: )
2) boot up using a win98 boot disk
3) run the GHOST program
4) choose CREATE BACKUP -- FROM -- LOCAL PARTITION  -- then select your drive (the 20gb)
5) choose the location to save the ghost backup to... this HAS to be a different partition than the one being backed-up... thats why we installed the 120gb HD first and formatted.

0
 
cyberdevil67Commented:
Whats wrong with ghost or something similar like I first said!

0
 
cyberdevil67Commented:
Sorry didn't see your comment about trying ghost...

If you can get the lates Ghost version 2005, you won;t need to boot to dos when creating the backup image to the new HD. But if you ghost it HD->Hd you don't need to worry about formating it unless you wish to repartition in then use partion magic as its the best, you can vene backup partitions in this program too.
0
 
_Commented:
Thank you much.    : )
0

Featured Post

Independent Software Vendors: We Want Your Opinion

We value your feedback.

Take our survey and automatically be enter to win anyone of the following:
Yeti Cooler, Amazon eGift Card, and Movie eGift Card!

  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • +4
Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now