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PHP/MYSQL

Why do PHP and MYSQL work well in conjunction with each other i am creating a selection system which will book final year porjects out to students but why use php/mysql instead of acess/asp (not cost).
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lukegriffiths110
Asked:
lukegriffiths110
1 Solution
 
gruntarCommented:
Hi, just one major reason; more stable (there are always problems with connections (ADO, ODBC problemes).

there also other reasons.. many of us don't like VBS syntax....

Cheers
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PromethylCommented:
I guess you could say PHP and mySQL represent "lessons learned" in the IT industry. They're simpler. Less components as he said.

And it passes the ACID test. =)
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virmaiorCommented:
better integration (same as what gruntar is saying), mysql and php work together in a rather seemless fashion compared to ASP/Access.

also, you have to write in VB style object-code in ASP -- whereas in php you can write c-style code using either linear or object coding methods.
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hendridmCommented:
I've found MySQL to work well with any language.  I've used it with PHP, ASP, a proprietary in-house scripting language, and most recently ASP.NET.  MySQL doesn't care.  Develop in ASP if you like, but for the love of God, don't use Access for the back end of a web site, especially if you expect to get any sort of hits.

PHP is easy to learn and has a lot of canned functions and community support.  ASP sucks, but is even easier learn (although that's about the only advantage, if it is one at all).

Access just sucks, period.  It has a *terrible* security model, it's inflexible, and it doesn't scale well.   MySQL, although not as robust as other DBMS like PostgreSQL or Oracle, works very well for small applications and has great speed, ease of setup and maintenance (at least on small to medium sites).
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PromethylCommented:
Agree.

I would mention it scales in the fact you can migrate to Microsoft $QL server.
=)

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hendridmCommented:
Promethyl -

True, and I suppose you could migrate to SQL Server Express when it is released, which as far as I remember will offer a free "lite" version to compete with MySQL, and also as far as I remember, will lift the restriction that it not be used on production sites like the current MSDE limitation.

I do really like the SQL Server management tools.
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PromethylCommented:
heh
How do you define production? MDSE is used on a lot of our workstations.

The M$ Enterprise SQL Manager? I love it. Much more than the Oracle equivalent. I only wish mysql had something like that. The only thing I've seen that comes close is phpmyadmin.

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hendridmCommented:
Yeah, the GUI tools from MySQL aren't quite as robust.  phpMyAdmin rocks, but it can be annoying to have to set up IIS+PHP just to administer.

It appears you are correct about MSDE.  It was my understanding that you couldn't deploy it and use it for development only.  However, upon further research, it appears you can redistribute it.  My appologies.  I'm not sure the license allows it to be used as a remote database for multi-tier applications, but their site is ambiguous enough that they might not care.  Of course, if you use MSDE, you'll probably want to snag the client tools from a full version of SQL Server or use the SQL Server Web Data Administrator from MS.
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PromethylCommented:
=)
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