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2 Network cards

Hi,

I'm wondering how to configure a second network card on my Windows 2000 Pro workstation so that all activity to the server goes through the 1st card, while all non-server activity (like sending to a printer, connecting to a another computer) goes throught the second.  Is this possible?

I want to reduce the load on the switch when the workstation talks to the main server.  It pumps a lot of gigs a day!  The server is an OS X server using samba to connect.  All our cables and cards are already Gigabit.  Both the server and the workstation have 2 cards on the mobo.

Another way to put it:  Tell the system to use card 1 when talking to ip x.x.x.1 and use card 2 for any other ip.  

Thanks,

MasterWoodsman
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MasterWoodsman
Asked:
MasterWoodsman
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1 Solution
 
fixnixCommented:
you'd do that via adding routes ('man route' from a terminal session)

will log into my OSX box @ home and try to get specifics if I get time...
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fixnixCommented:
Sorry...won't be able to log in to my OSX box til I get home...the IP I'm at now isn't on the ACL for me to punch a hole in my firewall to hit the mac.  I'll check back then if nobody else gets you squared away.
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dumbo2569Commented:
That's a simple route change.

In the command prompt:

route add <server ip> <ip mask> <card 1 ip>

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LloydSevCommented:
dumbo did forget a major part of that.

"route add <server ip> mask <ip mask> <card 1 ip> metric <metric>"
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MasterWoodsmanAuthor Commented:
If I get this straight, I tell the SERVER to set the route.  How do I tell the workstation to use that route, or does it get shifted after the first request?
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LloydSevCommented:
If you set the route on the workstation only, the server will send it back to the card which sent the request.

Therefore use the command

"route add <server ip> mask <ip mask> <card 1 ip> metric <metric>"

And you won't need to do anything on the server.
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dumbo2569Commented:
Sorry LloydSev, but I'll have to disagree with you on that.

It would be best practice to configure the route on the server and workstation. If it was just the workstation that sends the first request, then just configuring the workstation would be fine. But then you also have to take into consideration that the server might initiate the connection. In such a case, just configure the routes on both the server and workstation to be safe.

-Perry
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MasterWoodsmanAuthor Commented:
In my case the workstation will always be asking for the data and saving the data.  I can think of no reason why the server would decide to initiate a connection to transfer a large file.

Another question:  Once I figure out the syntax in Windows for the route command, is it stored somewhere or do I have to put it in some autoexec file for the next reboot?

Thanks for all your help so far!
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dumbo2569Commented:
Windows 2000 doesn't load AutoExec.bat at boot. It is only loaded when you launch an NTVDM session.

Unfortunately these static routes are only temporary. Your best bet is to create a batch file to add these routes and then put it into the c:\Documents and settings\all users\start menu\programs\startup folder.
 
-Perry

This is bascially what your batch should look like.

@echo off
route add <server ip> mask <ip mask> <card 1 IP> <metric>

-Perry
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dumbo2569Commented:
Sorry forgot to mention that the <metric> is optional, and if you do decide to include it, you will have to add the word "metric" before the metric number.
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MasterWoodsmanAuthor Commented:
Okay, I found out that the -p command will make it persistent accross reboots

So, I would type the following command in my WINDOWS computer,
assuming:
          SERVERCARD = ip address of network card on the SERVER
          LOCALCARD = ip address of network card on my WORKSTATION

route -p ADD SERVERCARD MASK 255.255.255.0 LOCALCARD METRIC 1 IF 2

I'm a little unclear what to put the in the gatway, metric and IF parameters.  I'm assuming that "2" means the second card, and metric=1 means highest priority.
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dumbo2569Commented:
Oh. I didn't know that you can make it persistent. Thanks.

The gateway is basically the IP of CARD 1. Metric is optional and so is the "IF". If you have the gateway set to the IP of card 1, then you should be fine.

So you can just do:
"route -p add servercard mask 255.255.255.255 localcard"

By the way, the mask should be 255.255.255.255, otherwise you will start to send traffic to SERVERCARD's subnet through card 1.




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MasterWoodsmanAuthor Commented:
Thanks for the help, dumbo!  (and others)

Unfortunately, after all this, I won't be able to implement it (HEARTBREAK!)  It turns out that my Xserve cannot support more than 1 appletalk network card at a time, and since I need both to do it, I'm stuck!

No speed-up for me!  :(

Master Woodsman
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dumbo2569Commented:
sorry to hear that and best of luck...
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