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Looking for a good way to edit policies

Hi All.

I am going to be implementing a Windows 2003 Application Server on a network where users are going to use RDP through thin clients to work on the server. What I would like to do is control access levels of what users can and cannot do on the server. I have seen schools and libraries do this stuff before where items like the local C: drive, Display properties, Start Items, etc are inaccessable to the user. I do not want the users to mess up the server in any way. I want them to log in, have only the shortcuts to the software that they use and that's it. I also want to take away their ability to shut down or reboot the server, because I can just see that happening like 10 times a day when users forget that it's the server and not their workstation that they are rebooting.

I assume that all of these things are done via the policy editor, but looking through it, a lot of the descriptions might as well be written in Chinese. It is also confusing which policy effects what and where to find many of the controls. There has got to be a guide or some software to make this task simpler. Detailed documentation on how the policy editor works and what/how exctly each control effect the system may be sufficent.
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123abc
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123abc
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Chris DentPowerShell DeveloperCommented:

A couple of tools that may help are:

Group Policy Management Console (Requires Windows XP or 2003):

http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserver2003/gpmc/default.mspx

This includes policy modelling tools as well as a much nicer display of everything that is set.

Resultant Set of Policy Tool (Windows XP and 2003 - pre-installed):

This tools is excellent for troubleshooting policy problems and seeing what policies are in effect on a specific User and Computer combination.
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luv2smileCommented:
If you haven't arleady, donwload the GPMC (group policy management console). This tool will help you a lot in managing your policies.

http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserver2003/gpmc/default.mspx
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luv2smileCommented:
Opps, forgot to hit refresh...sorry chris :)
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Chris DentPowerShell DeveloperCommented:
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joedoe58Commented:
Still my question is why do you even allow users to work on the server. If they only need to start their applications there should not be any need for them to work on the server.
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Chris DentPowerShell DeveloperCommented:

hehe no problem luv2smile :)
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Chris DentPowerShell DeveloperCommented:

Hmm I forgot to add... To load the Resultant Set of Policy tool you can use Start, Run and rsop.msc
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