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i want to connect two access point using a bridge, is this ok?

hi experts!

i just got an instructions from my boss, that he wants to connect his home wireless network to his office wireless network. he said he is planning to use a "bridge" to connect this two access point? is it possible? because from what i have read... bridges only keep traffic meant for station on one side of that side of the bridge and not let it pass to the other side, only traffice destined for a workstation on the other side of the bridge will pass ot the other side.

what can you recommend as a better solutions for this set up?

arnel
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arnel1257
Asked:
arnel1257
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2 Solutions
 
purplepomegraniteCommented:
So your boss lives very close to the office?  Many APs do support both bridging and AP mode, though note that when operating in this mode you will be halving the bandwidth of the wireless network (which will also become one wireless network as opposed to two).

Or are you trying to connect two networks that are in different locations?
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arnel1257Author Commented:
yes, im trying to connect two networks that are in different locations.. thanks by the way for your immediate reply.

actually the office is far from his home..  and i know that wireless network has a certain limit when it comes to signal strenght... right now the office is still using wired network. but since he said that the he wants to connect to two access point .. im assuming that he will upgrade to wireless network for his office.

another question is ... where is the bridge should be located?

arnel
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purplepomegraniteCommented:
Ok, if he is not located near the office, wireless bridging is pretty much out of the question (I say pretty much, because it is technically possible to wireless bridge over several miles - but it is ridiculously expensive and requires line of sight among other things!).

The best way to connect the networks would be to set up a VPN between the home and the office.  If home and office both have broadband, then you could do this using two routers such as a Draytek 2600G.  These can be configured to create a permanent VPN between the two devices (and step by step instructions are provided by Draytek - http://www.draytek.co.uk/support/vpn_setup.html). I have used this solution in many places.

Another option would be to just replace the router at the office with one that supports VPN and create a dial-in VPN connection on your bosses' computer (again, the Draytek 2600G offers this facility).
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arnel1257Author Commented:
both the office and home has an internet access, using DSL. We dont have routers to connect to internet... so i think we should go with your last option and that is create a dial-in VPN connection on my boss home wireless network.

is this right?


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snerkelCommented:
No hardware is required if you have a Windows XP or 2000 with an Internet connection at the office that can run the built-in VPN server like this http://www.tech24.arce.co.uk/vpns.htm

On your bosses PC set-up like this http://www.tech24.arce.co.uk/vpnc.htm if the boss doesn't have XP or 2000 then you can download a VPN client from Microsoft
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purplepomegraniteCommented:
While it is absolutely correct that VPN can be achieved in other ways, the router approach offers several advantages, of which a few are:

- increased security.  The router (at least, the models detailed above) incorporates a firewall to protect from internet abuse (i.e. abuse originating from the internet!)
- ease of use.  Two router set up with VPN require no user intervention.  Once the VPN is set-up, it is permanently available, transparently.
- more computers can be added at either end and immediately have full access to the entire network.
- the router can incorporate other useful functionality - in this case, wireless.  Where there isn't currently wireless at the office, adding a wireless router will kill two birds with one stone.
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purplepomegraniteCommented:
Having said this, the none router approach means you can create the connection immediately and test it, if both machines have Win2000 or above.
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arnel1257Author Commented:

hi snerkel,

on the site that you gave me... i need to set up also a router?

http://www.tech24.arce.co.uk/vpnr.htm

but you said there is no hardware required...

im trying this connection

i configure my pc as vpn server with an ip address of 192.168.0.19
in my client pc i will specify the same ip address as the IP address of destination? is this correct?

i want to make sure before i set it up in my boss's home and office.

arnel

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snerkelCommented:
I assume you are trying this on your own network without using the Internet to connect the two (hence the 192.168 IP address) ?

If you are then the client would connect to 192.168.0.19



When using direct connection to the Internet then you don't need to worry about the router settings, all the other settings are the same as those on the link. Maybe some more details on the office connection to the Internet would help, eg do you have a server providing Internet access for the office etc.
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arnel1257Author Commented:
hehehe.. your guess is right... actually both of them has internet connections... that is why i dont know if they are connecting thru internet or via lan.. im planning to buy an internet card so that i can disconnect the client pc from our network and try connecting first to a public network like the internet before trying to establish a virtual connection between my client vpn and server vpn.

by the way the set up in the office is ...

one PC has a DSL account to access the internet and we installed a proxy server so that all the member of the network can access the internet via proxy connection. the pc that has a DSL account has an IP address of 192.168.0.1 . i was planning to make this as the VPN Server ... and so in my boss's home.. i will configure one of his pc as client vpn to connect to this vpn server and this client will connect to 192.168.0.1, right? .

we dont a router for both network... both of the networks are connecting to the internet via DSL.

arnel

 








 
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snerkelCommented:
client will connect to 192.168.0.1, right? No the client will connect to the VPN server Internet IP address.

On the vpn server open a DOS box and type

ipconfig

You will probably see two network adaptors, the one with the IP address 192.168.0.1 and the other adaptor (called something that should be related to the modem?) will have the IP address that you need your boss to connect to.

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arnel1257Author Commented:
thanks snerkel!

ill try this when i go to the site.

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