no browsing through network neighborhood (win2000)

Posted on 2005-04-14
Last Modified: 2010-04-10
here is our setup:

we got a fileserver (named F1), and a mailserver (named C1), and 15 clients (named R1-R15) in the office and one laptop (named N2) (all win2k).
the mailserver is the domain server and primary wins, the filesever secondary.
they are both setup correctly, and working.

all our clients can browse the internal network, execpt for the laptop (that is also used in another network and does not belong to the domain).
we can connect to the fileserver from the laptop, as we can from any other client, if we connect the drives through the ip-adress of the fileserver (eg. "//" instead of "//F1/test").
we also can ping the laptop using its name, but cannot ping any computer from the laptop using its name.

what could be the problem, how do i solve it?
thanks in advance. jan
Question by:janorama
    LVL 1

    Expert Comment

    Sounds like a DNS problem.  
    Couple of questions (you may have already checked this bare with me!)

    Is the DNS configured and working properly on your network?
    Are you using DHCP (it appears you are)  of so, are the clients configured to obtain DNS addresses automatically?  Your could try putting in the address of your DNS server in the client TCP/IP settings, that will probably fix your browsing problem)


    Author Comment

    The DNS is configured, we are using two DNS-adresses from our ISP (IP-adresses and
    can i setup a dns within our network?
    due to security-reasons, we are having a third server for the internet (which is the standard-gateway for all clients calling the net). could i set the gateway as DNS for the internal network, and set the DNS from our ISP in the gateway only?

    alternatively (since our setup works fine for all other clients) could i set the DNS-Server for the Laptop only? (eg setting it to the standard-gateway, or must it be the wins, dhcp ... ?)

    We are using DHCP and the clients get their adresses automatically (within a defined range). the laptop has a static ip, though.

    thanks. jan
    LVL 1

    Expert Comment

    Sorry, I read your original question to fast.  The laptop is the only one that cannot browse the Internal network (unless your use ip addresses) is that correct?  If so, the laptop needs the DNS settings for the network it is trying to browse.  You say it is configured for a different domain.
    Your file server (F1) is it Windows 2000?  Are your running AD?
    Right now it seems that the only DNS information is coming from your ISP.  Your ISP doesn't know about your local network, therefore you need to run DNS on your server so that all machines on the LAN can see each other via their names.

    Hope this helps!

    Author Comment

    The Laptop is only configured for a workgroup (since it is mostly used in a different network).
    the fileserver is win2000 (what is AD?)
    eventhough we are using an external DNS all internal clients cann see eachother, even the laptop.

    what would you propose to setup the dns? where do i include the information on the DNS of our ISP?

    thanks. jan
    LVL 1

    Accepted Solution

    AD is active directory
    Check out this link for information:

    Are your computers part of a domain?  

    On my small W2K network. I have DNS enabled on my file server and Active Directory.  AD is not needed per say, I just wanted to practise with it.  The DNS handles all the domain name to ip translation internally.  For example:  I have a computer named nurserycryme.  The DNS  entry knows that this is actually ip address

    Without writing page after page, check out this site for some information:
    There are a million other sites that can assist with setting up DNS.

    Getting back to the actual problem. the laptop will not be able to ping any computer using a name unless their is some sort of name translation DNS or WINS
    LVL 6

    Expert Comment

    you dont "have" to use DNS, wins should work just fine for you.  DNS is the preferred method, and with your windows2k server, you could set up dns on the local network relatively easily.  You could first try to add the local ip's to the laptop's hosts file.  do a search, file name hosts.  Your computer will check the hosts file before anything else, wins or dns.  On winxp the hosts file is in c:\windows\system32\drivers\etc

    I believe it's the same for windows 2000, open the file in notepad, and add your entries, it should look like this:

    # Copyright (c) 1993-1999 Microsoft Corp.
    # This is a sample HOSTS file used by Microsoft TCP/IP for Windows.
    # This file contains the mappings of IP addresses to host names. Each
    # entry should be kept on an individual line. The IP address should
    # be placed in the first column followed by the corresponding host name.
    # The IP address and the host name should be separated by at least one
    # space.
    # Additionally, comments (such as these) may be inserted on individual
    # lines or following the machine name denoted by a '#' symbol.
    # For example:
    #          # source server
    #              # x client host       localhost     R6

    As you can see, I've added an example entry for R6, add as many lines as you need, seperate the ip address, and the hostname by a single TAB.

    Save the file, then try to ping the hostname.  If you want to set up DNS, we can do that as well.
    LVL 1

    Expert Comment

    Looks like the problem may be WINS and not DNS.  Ensure that you have the IP address of the Domain Controller coded in the WINS settings.

    Author Comment

    hi everybody.
    thanks for your help. i solved the problem. It was the WINS and DNS settings on the laptop. since i was able to ping the laptop by its name from any other machine on the network it must have been a problem with the laptop itself. since it is used in a variety of networks the settings were very general and we did not enter a wins nor a dns settings, since these information were supposed to be drawn from the server. entering them solved the problem ...

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