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Adding Wireless to a standard LAN (Windows 2000 server) using a linksys router.

I'm running a very standard W2K LAN, with Internet provided via T1.  Jacks are wired all over the building - they all connect to switches that are connected to the server.  Workstations plugged in to any jack can get to the Internet, and it's possible to log onto to the LANIs it possible to just plug in a linksys router to one of the ethernet jacks and have it provide a wireless access point?

The need is to be able to support one or two wireless laptops, and the location will change depending on what is going on.  There is not a need for much range so I'm thinking of just moving the wireless router from place to place as needed.   I can get the laptops to connect to the wireless network, but there is no Internet or LAN access, possibly because of how the router is configured.  
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RBECKMN
Asked:
RBECKMN
1 Solution
 
rindiCommented:
That should be no problem. Setup the AP to get it's settings from your lan's dhcp server, turn the internal dhcp server off and your laptop should get it's settings from your normal server. This way it would adjust to the network segment you are on.
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InteractiveMindCommented:
> Is it possible to just plug in a linksys router to one of the ethernet jacks and have it provide a wireless access point?
I don't see why not.

> but there is no Internet or LAN access, possibly because of how the router is configured.
Yeah, the router will be acting as a gateway/firewall no doubt, and what you're doing here is a form of "intranetworking" (networking 2+ different networks [topologies]).
For now, Make sure that your router allows all ports to be used (there should be some configuration some where to do this - just check it's user manual/documentation). Then, for now, resetup the network on the two wireless laptops, so that they connect to the correct Workgroup.

Also make sure that your server (and/or the ICS host)'s firewall(s) allow all traffic on the necessary Network Interfaces.

Regards;
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InteractiveMindCommented:
Yeah, listen to rindi  :)
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jkinder3382Commented:
I would have to disagree with rindi.  He is right that the setup in theory should work but as far as the external dhcp server goes it will not propagate to the laptops because it is acting like a router.  It connects two different networks.  Here is what I suggest.  Plug the network cable from a switch to the internet port of the router.  Setup up the wireless router to serve DHCP.  Then add the DNS servers in manually to the servers that you use on your network.  This should propagate to the laptops with the DHCP address.  In theory you should get it to work.

Hope this helps.
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snerkelCommented:
The way you have it setup should work, assuming you are connected from your existing network to the WAN port of the router.

I bet the LAN IP range of the router is the same as the existing networks IP range, eg 192.168.1.x

If this is the case then you can change the LAN IP range of the wireless router so that it is a different range, eg 192.168.2.x this will then work.

Note with the arrangement above PCs on your wired network won't be able to see the wireless PCs, however the wireless PCs will be able to see your network and the Internet OK.

If you want the wireless PCs to be accesable from the wired network then you need to setup the wireless router like this http://www.tech24.arce.co.uk/rap.htm
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RBECKMNAuthor Commented:
The router in question does not have an option to configure ports, and only the last part of the router's IP range can be changed.  Disabling the router DHCP caused the connectivity to fail - depending on the network card in use, the laptops either could not acquire an IP address or acquired an external IP address (outside of the firewall, so must have come from the ISP??).  What worked was configuring the router with the network's DNS and WINS IPs, also plugging it into the network using one of the regular ports rather than the uplink port.
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