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Remote Desktop Connection problem using Win 98! 500 POINTS!

Hi,

I am trying to connect to my server at work.  Its a Windows Server 2003 machine and I setup the Remote Desktop features on this machine and allowed a user to access it also.  Now I am home and on my Windows 98 computer, after installing Remote Desktop Connection, I enter the FQDN or the external IP address of the server but the connection keeps timing out.


SOMEBODY PLEASE HELP!!
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NAPSR
Asked:
NAPSR
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1 Solution
 
ruddgCommented:
Do you control the firewall at your workplace?  If so, what type is it and how is it configured?  Is this a direct RDP connection, or is a VPN connection required first?  Please provide some details about your setup.
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yto_danielCommented:
Have you considered trying something like VNC rather than using RD? also make sure your forwarding the correct ports to the server if you have a firewall.

Daniel - YourTechOnline.com technician
danielr@no_spam_yourtechonline.com (remove no_spam_)

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ZabagaRCommented:
Double-check and make sure that your Windows 2003 machine is waiting for a connection by going to the command prompt on it and typing: netstat -a

You should see, among many other ports, 3389 as "listening"

Then make sure on your firewall or router that you are allowing incoming traffic to port 3389

3389 is what RDP uses.

If is *still* doesn't work, try using RDP from another machine (not your windows 98 machine) as a test.  Just to rule out your machine as the problem.  I recall various connection related problems with Windows 98 (second edition? is that what you have?).  Occasionally, having the latest MSDUN 1.4 download for 98 solved some of those issues.
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NAPSRAuthor Commented:
Thank you all for replying!

I am using a Linksys router at work.  I do not have a third party firewall installed since the router has a built in firewall.  I tried installing a third party firewall but it kept crashing the server.

PORT 3389 NEEDS TO OPENED!!  I thought I did this but I am not sure.  So I need to go to the router and open port 3389?

Regarding using VNC, I could not get anyone on expertsexchange to help me configure VNC so I just decided to use the remote desktop.

Thank you all for your help.  I will check to make sure port 3389 is opened tomorrow at work and will post back.

If anyone can please help me setup VNC, I will be very grateful!

Thanks
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ZabagaRCommented:
Hey, I've used both VNC and Windows 2003's RDP many times.  They both work well and have their time & place.
From what I've read from you, I'd use RDP.

-z-
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bmquintasCommented:
Not only opened, you need to forward the port 3389 from your router to the lan ip address of the server.
The RDP performance among windows OS seems better than vnc (my opinion).

If you still want to try it, you must install vnc server in the 2003 box, forward port 5901 from the router to the server (just like with RDP), and use the vnc viewer at the w98.
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snerkelCommented:
Which ever method you use RD or VNC if you can setup a VPN tunnel it will be far more secure, and will allow RD or VNC to be used as you require without opening ports other than 1723 (PPTP VPN).

VPN will also give you facilities as though connected to the real network, making it far more flexible.

I generally use VNC with RD as a backup if VNC locks.
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NAPSRAuthor Commented:
Hi,

Can any of you help me please?  I am at the office right now and I opened Port 3389 and forwarded it to the internal IP address of the server.  Then I am trying to connect using a different server on a different internet connection by using Remote Desktop but it will not connect.  Both machines are running windows server 2003.

Please help.
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ZabagaRCommented:
To test, what I would do first is try using RDP locally from a PC on the same LAN as the Windows 2003 Server.
Because, what you're doing is eliminating the router/firewall as a possible problem point.

Do you have Windows XP on a PC in the LAN? It has the remote desktop connection by default.  You could then enter the local IP address of the Win2003 server and try to connect to it. See if it will even work internally first.

There really aren't too many components at work here.  On the Windows 2003 Server, all you did I assume is right click on my computer, pick properties and chose the remote tab. From there, you click the box to allow remote desktop incoming.
Then you make sure port 3389 is opened and/or forwarding (for outside the LAN connections).

I have experienced a few "odd" connection errors when using the downloaded RDP client on a Windows 2000 & 98 PC - - which is why I asked if you had an XP PC you could use, since it comes built with the RDP client and I've never had trouble with it.
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wilsontjCommented:
Make sure you are allowing for both TCP and UDP.
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NAPSRAuthor Commented:
I am allowing for both TCP and UDP.

I tried logging in from an internal network computer using Windows XP but it gave me the same error.

Maybe its the way I am loggin in:
On the Remote Desktop Connection screen:

Computer: external IP address
Username: is it just "user" or "user@domain.com"
Password: typed in the password that I created for "user" under Active Directory Users area
Domain: what do i enter here?

Thanks
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ZabagaRCommented:
username = username (no other text required)

domain = well, only you know the name of the domain your Windows 2003 server is in.  If it's not in a domain, enter the workgroup name its in.

Please make sure that the user you created has rights to login.

Go to windows 2003 server
right click my computer
pick properties
click remote tab
under "remote desktop" click the button "select remote users"

make sure the user you're logging in as, is listed.  the "Administrator" by default is the only user that can get in.
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NAPSRAuthor Commented:
I just entered the IP address and nothing else and it won't even give me a login prompt screen.

I'm thinking its some permission setting I am missing on the server.

Thanks
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NAPSRAuthor Commented:
anybody else...please help!!
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ZabagaRCommented:
If RDP is up&waiting on the server, you'd at least get the login prompt box despite any permissions.

You never did respond to my post earlier when I asked you to do a "netstat -a" from the cmd prompt on the 2003 server.

If you run that command, you should see a list scroll by, with an entry like this:

TCP     machine_name:3389          fully_qualified_machine_name:0         LISTENING

This shows port 3389 listening, waiting for an incoming connection.
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NAPSRAuthor Commented:
I tried doing that but I do not see anything scroll by at all.  So my port is not even open?
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NAPSRAuthor Commented:
Any suggestion on why port 3389 is not listed when I do a "netstat -a".  I have that port opened in the router.

If you do not know the answer, please let me know so I can open a new question in the community.

Thank you all for trying.
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bmquintasCommented:
1- Open the remote desktop from a xp inside the lan ant fill nothing else but the ip of the server.
When the remote computer shows up then put user and pass (by default only admins have remote access to server)
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NAPSRAuthor Commented:
bmquintas,

Thanks for the input.  That still does not work.  I gave another user access also.

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NAPSRAuthor Commented:
When I do the netstat -a -n command, I get CLOSE_WAIT for the port 192.168.1.21:3389.

What does this mean?
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NAPSRAuthor Commented:
In the Event Viewer, there was a warning: RemoteAccess and it said:

Explanation
This computer cannot accept Layer Two Tunneling Protocol (L2TP) virtual private network (VPN) calls because it does not have an L2TP computer certificate installed.
 

Does this have anything to do with it?
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