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how to configure a floppy drive

Hey,

I just bought a floppy drive (3.5in) 1.44MO... and I really feel stupid cuz I'm really not able to install it :(... it's a NEC FD1231H. I really don't know what doesn't work with it, I plugged everything and when I try to access it from my computer, I get a message telling me to insert a disk in the floppy drive. Thanks for your help.

Oh my god I never thought I would ever ask a stupid question as this one!!!
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flopizzz
Asked:
flopizzz
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2 Solutions
 
cyberdevil67Commented:
Hi flopizzz,

 It would be that maybe the cable is not the right way around, does the light on the drive stay on at all, if so then the cable is the wrong way around.

Cheers!
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Diane258Commented:
i agree with cyber,

but i should also add, did you convigure the BIOS to tell it there is a floppy drive?

and also you DO have to put in a disk in order for the floppy to read,
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Tag_MarkmanCommented:

Cyber is right, When a floppy drive cable is on backwards, the light is usually constantly on but it usually will not ask for a floppy disk.

Diane is also right, but do not just check for the existance of a floppy diskdriver, your computer is already reconizing it and asking for the floppy disk. Check the boot sequence in the CMOS. It can look for the Floppy Drive only without going for another boot device. If this is the case it will always ask this question.

Some drives also need the jumpers set properly, but this shouldn't be the case because it is seeing the drive.


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nobusCommented:
you did connect the power cable too, did you?
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cyberdevil67Commented:
Ok,

There is a few things that I think I will ask that might be too obvious, but I'll ask anyway. But as well as putting the cable on backwards it is also very easy with floppy drives to not connect the cable properly and have a few pins exposed (Done this before myself)
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William FulksSystems Analyst & WebmasterCommented:
Try a different disk, too. You could just have a bad floppy disk that the drive can't read.
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WatzmanCommented:

You need to connect both the power and the data cable.

The data cable may have 2 or 3 connectors, and should have a section of the cable cut and "twisted" near the drive end.  [a very old data cable might have 5 connectors, the extra 2 being "card edge" connectors for old 5.25" floppy drives].

The connector at the end of the cable with the twist goes to the drive.  The connector at the other end goes to the motherboard.  If there is a 3rd connector, the connector with the "twist" goes to the 1st drive, and the connector with no effective twist goes to the 2nd drive (the twist may be in the middle, consisting of a "twist" and an "untwist" on either side of the middle of the 3 connectors).

One edge of the cable will be "colored", usually a red or blue paint stripe applied to the gray cable.  This edge is "Pin 1" of the connector at BOTH the motherboard and the drive.  You need to identify which end of the connectors on both the motherboard and the drive is "pin 1".  There are 4 ways to connect the cable.  Sometimes, the cable and/or the cable sockets are "polarized" so that they cannot be plugged in wrong, but most often this is not the case.  The 4 ways are:

- Correctly
- Backwards at both ends
- Correct at motherboard end, wrong at drive end
- Wrong at motherboard end, correct at drive end

[Guess which of the 4 ways will work?  Hint: only one of them]

This should resolve your problems if the drive and motherboard are both good, and if the drive is a modern drive.  If it's a very old drive, it may have "drive select jumpers", allowing you to select any of up to 4 "drive select lines".  (the lines may be numbered 0 to 3 or 1 to 4).  If you have such a jumper, for PC use, it should always be set to the "2nd" position (1 on drives with positions 0-3, or 2 on drives with positions 1-4).
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flopizzzAuthor Commented:
Okay I think you could help me solving my problem by telling me how to know if the cable is on the right side and how to configure the BIOS.

Thanks
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WatzmanCommented:

There is very little bios configuration for a floppy.  The option is there to disable it entirely, and you may have an option to choose the type of floppy (360k 5.25", 1.2MB 5.25", 720k 3.5" or 1.44MB 3.5" (you probably want 1.44MB 3.5" I presume)).  There may be an option for "mode 3" or something like that, which is a japanese format that is not normally used in the US.  That's about it.  There is no configuration in windows, either.

As to "how to know if the cable is on the right side", I'm not sure what you mean, but again, the stripe end of the cable goes to pin one at both ends (motherboard and floppy drive) (by the way, this is a convention for all ribbon cables on all types of devices).

On the motherboard, pin 1 will usually be numbered on the board itself, and also you can look in the motherboard manual and it will show which end is pin 1 (the other side will sometimes be marked pin 34).  On many drives, you will also find the pin numbers for the end pins (or at least for pin 1) silk-screened on the drive circuit card.  Sometimes, instead of a "1" to indicate pin 1, it's an arrow or a triangle.  Finally, the good news is that I've never heard of either a motherboard or a drive being destroyed by reversing the data cable at either or both ends.  It won't work, of course, but it won't do any damage.  Often, if you get it wrong on the drive end only, the drive light will be lit continuously.  But if you get it wrong at the motherboard end, other symptoms are possible.
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Tag_MarkmanCommented:

When your computer boots, it goes through a POST. During that time you can enter the system bios by holding down a key. This key is different from box to box but I've commonly seen it with F1, DEL, or ESC. If a bios password is not set, you will get into the system bios. There will be a menu (different from bios manufacture and version) but one of the choices will be boot sequence (you might have to dig into deeper menu). when you select it, it will cycle through common boot devices. If it is floppy only, it will always ask for that question because it expects to load the OS from the floppy.

If the Boot sequence also happens to have a hard drive in the sequence, then the problem might not be with the floppy at all but the hard drive or the OS on the hard drive. If an OS can not be loaded from the hard drive, it will try to load it from the floppy (if it is in the boot sequence). The problem could be a the cable to the hard drive, upsidedown, not connected, not connected properly, no power to the hard drive, corrupted hard drive, jumpers, the list goes on.

I'm pretty much guessing the problem is not with the floppy drive. I think that is a red herring. My money is on the BIOS or another failing boot device.
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avinashrkCommented:
Please check all the cables of the floppy drive
While ussing Windows XP ,If all the cables U have connected is right then it will automatically asks "format the floppy drive"
then U click on automatically format quick
 and also check BIOS of UR computer.
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flopizzzAuthor Commented:
Well now, I can access it, but it asks me to format the floppy disk, but never lets me do it. It says that the floppy disk is Write-protected and I tried with 3 different ones. Is there something I did wrong or is it the disk?
Thanks
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nobusCommented:
if it says the floppy is write protected, you have to move the plastic part in the left corner (label side up, insertion side away from you) so that the hole is covered
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nobusCommented:
_____________
  |     |       |    |
  |     | ___ |    |
  |                   |
  |                   |
  |                   |
  |__               |
  |__|________|    <----here
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Tag_MarkmanCommented:
Nobus... I love the ASCII art :) beautiful.

flopizzz, It's asking you to format the disk because it's not formatted. Normally, when you get a new disk that is not formatted, the write protection is already off. You might have to format it the old fashion way (from the dos prompt - assuming that you are on a dos or windows box) ;)

From the DOS (command)  prompt type:
format A:

If you want more information type:
format /?

To get to the dos promt from current versions of windows (Start->Run) then type cmd.

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