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local database

Hello,

We have SQL server enterprise manager installed on windows XP pro, but we don't have a local sample database, how can we create one?

Thank you.
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epmo
Asked:
epmo
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3 Solutions
 
Anthony PerkinsCommented:
You will have to install the Developer edition of SQL Server.  So that you can access Northwind and Pubs databases.
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epmoAuthor Commented:
how do we know what version we have?
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epmoAuthor Commented:
version 8.0, but don't see edition anywhere..
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Anthony PerkinsCommented:
You either have installed the Server components or not.  The easiest way would be to see if there is a MSSQLServer service running.  Otherwise try creating a new SQL Server Registration for the local computer "(local)" and see if you have any luck.
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Anthony PerkinsCommented:
On second thoughts, I may have misuderstood your question.  Are you saying that your SQL Server does not have Northwind and/or Pubs databases installed.  If so you can download them from here:

Northwind and pubs Sample Databases
http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID=06616212-0356-46a0-8da2-eebc53a68034&DisplayLang=en
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epmoAuthor Commented:
ok.. i see the script to create the databases.. but we don't have a server to create them on..  just tried  creating a new SQL Server Registration for the local computer but no luck.. server does not exists.. I think is the server what we need..
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rafranciscoCommented:
Looks like you only have the Client tools installed.  You must install the database engine for you to be able to create a database.  Or you can connect to SQL Server on another server and the sample databases may be there.
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JesterTooCommented:
I believe the Standard Edition and the Enterprise Editions both require a SERVER to install... they won't install on workstation OS's such as XP or WIN2K Pro.  The Developer Edition works just fine, though, and has all the features of Enterprise Editon except for support of large memory and more than 2 processors.
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Anthony PerkinsCommented:
>>I believe the Standard Edition and the Enterprise Editions both require a SERVER to install... <<
Yep.  It has to be the Developer edition.
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Anthony PerkinsCommented:
>>version 8.0, but don't see edition anywhere..<<
That is the Version of Enterprise Manager. Until you have a registered server you cannot tell the version :)
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Anthony PerkinsCommented:
>>Another possible option MSDE<<
Since they have installed Enterprise Manager, one could assume that the questioner is licensed to at least install the Developer Edition.
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epmoAuthor Commented:
We would assume the same. With enterprise manager we should be able to have a local server. Would MSDE add a server we can access with Enterprise Manager and query analizer?. We are thinking we have only client tools installed. That might be the problem.
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epmoAuthor Commented:
ok, the problem is that we have only client tools.. and when we tried to install a server, we get: "...server components are not supported on this OS" .. great..
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Anthony PerkinsCommented:
>>we get: "...server components are not supported on this OS" .. great..<<
Just ignore it and it will install the Developer Edition.
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epmoAuthor Commented:
we did, and it installed only client components..
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Anthony PerkinsCommented:
>>With enterprise manager we should be able to have a local server. <<
Enterprise Manager is just a tool to access SQL Server(s) and has no bearing on the server(s) per se.

>>we did, and it installed only client components..<<
Since you only have the Standard or Enterprise Edition you cannot install the Developer Edition.  So your best bet is to follow jimpen suggestion of downloading and installing MSDE, you can then use Enterprise Manager to access it.  (MSDE does not come with any tools such as Enterprise Manager and SQL Query Analyser)
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Anthony PerkinsCommented:
Incidentally the Developer Edition comes with the MSDN subscription.
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JesterTooCommented:
I believe you must explicitly install the Developer Edition... it's a different "installable" than Enterprise Edition.  If you don't have D.E., you could elect to install MSDE... it gets you just about everything you need to do SQL Server development with and you already have the management utilitues, EM and QA, which work just fine with MSDE.  There is also the Personal Edition and a Workgroup Edition (don't know much about this one... probably still needs a server OS).  I think the P.E will also install on a non-server OS but it's probably no better to develop on than MSDE or D.E.

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epmoAuthor Commented:
ok we will try MSDE. Just one more question, what is the difference between MSDE and Enterprise Edition? is MSDE just a development server without client tools? and what are the limitations?
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JesterTooCommented:
Licensing (MSDE is free for limited use), it's missing a few features of it's bigger brothers such as OLAP, full text search (I think), does not support all the various replication features, limits database size to 2GB, can use maximum of 2 processors, limited to 2GB of memory usage, cannot create (but can execute) DTS packages, contains a workload governor that kicks in around 5 concurrent queries (this doesn't limit number of connections but does cause the queries to execure more slowly with decreasing performance as more concurrent queries are attempted, and a few more.

See these links for more info...

   http://www.microsoft.com/sql/msde/default.asp
   http://www.teratrax.com/articles/msde_vs_sql_server.html
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Jim P.Commented:
Thanks for the points.

MSDE is used a lot of times for deleverable apps that have a limited number of users but don't want the limitations of Access DB's.  We have a delivered app that the clients connects to a "server" (overblown PC) and then the server actually is the only one that has connections to the DB on the PC. It works.

And in your case of testing and development -- it should be all you need to build the structure and test.  And the nice thing is that it can be controlled and accessed with alt the EM and QA tools.
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epmoAuthor Commented:
You're welcome jimpen - so you're saying that you can actually deploy apps with MSDE as a backend without problems aas long as it is connecting from the same pc? does MSDE has any performance limitations? or as long you have the same server/DB/PC eveything will work fine?

Thanks.
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Jim P.Commented:
You are limited to a 25 connections - it has no enterprise manager or QA with it. I think backups are pretty much stop the service, copy the mdf/ldf and restart the service.

But we ran the delevered app that way for 2+ years until we moved the DB onto a SQL Server. We have another app from the phone company that uses MSDE for our bills.

You would have to set up you client/server environment that has the client writing to the "server" app and then the app writes to the database to beat the connection limitation. And you could have the server app on a different box from the MSDE server.

The EM and QA recognize the MSDE server as a valid SQL Server and can control it, but the EM does not come with MSDE. (Not sure about QA). And performance limitations are the same as any "server" as far as memory, bandwidth, CPU, etc.  I think there is also a lmit to the max size of the DBs, but it is fairly generous.
This link http://www.microsoft.com/sql/msde/default.asp from  JesterToo gets into some of the finer details.

But you can actually deploy apps with it. The link above has instructions on how to automate the MSDE install.
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JesterTooCommented:
The current MSDE no longer has a formal connection limit... it has a query governor instead.  The way it's implemented is that once it reaches 5 concurrent queries (doesn't matter if they're from 5 different users or just 1) the query engine begins introducing "delays" before starting the processing of new queries.  Note this doesn't slow down the actual query while it's processing... it just makes the query wait some amount of time before it begins processing.  As more queries are submitted for concurrent processing the amount of delay increases.  The delay isn't terribly noticeable until you pass about 8 queries and becomes unbearable  shortly thereafter with application timeouts, unhappy users, etc.

There are a few more differences in features, but probably none that will impact you terribly unless you need replication from MSDE, full text searching, OLAP processing, DTS package creation, etc.

Thank you for the grade!

-- Lynn
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