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DELL Power Edge 1750 SCSI will not boot

Single Drive non RAID Ultra 320 SCSI 80 pin drive

When the trying to boot from the drive I get the message:

"DEVICE NOT RESPONDING HBA 0"
"F1 - Reboot F2 - Setup"

When hitting Ctrl A during bootup and going into the SCSI Config Util
the Seagate drive shows up there but I can't do a Verify. Its just hangs at 0% for a while then returns to the previous screen.

DELL gave me a new HD and that is working fine in the same slot the old one was. Ultimatly I want to get the data off the bad drive. Anyone have any Ideas? I'm trying to get around sending it to http://www.drivesavers.com/ and paying from 500 to 2700 dollars that was the closest they could narrow it down for me.
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kandersen
Asked:
kandersen
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1 Solution
 
tmj883Commented:
If the data is worth more than 2700, anything other than a professional service, may reduce the chance of data recovery. If not so, there are many data recovery tools as freeware and shareware.
T
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kandersenAuthor Commented:
Other than the Freeware data recovery tools. How whould I connect to an 80 pin Ultra 320 SCSI connection? I notice that the power to this drive in integrated into the SCSI connector. Are there converters out there to do this?
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Purple_TidderCommented:
From what I know, only to convert to other types of SCSI.  I've seen some adapters to where you can connect an IDE drive to SCSI controller, but not the other way around.  I don't quite know what you're looking for, but if you're wanting to say hook up your SCSI drive to and IDE controller, you're probably out of luck.  From the sound of it, you won't get any data from that drive anyhow, but good luck.
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kandersenAuthor Commented:
I was thinking of a SCSI to SCSI type of conveter like a 68 pin to 80 or some other type. Sounds like my only option is a data recovery service though.

Thanks for the feed back
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Purple_TidderCommented:
Yup, they have those converters.  Expensive though.

http://www.macgurus.com/productpages/scsi/mgscsiadapters.php
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dlonganCommented:
If the drive isn't able to be seen by a controller then your best bet is to have a professional data recovery service do the work.  Either the drive electronics or mechanics have gone south...
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kandersenAuthor Commented:
I think you may be right "dlongan". I'm going to give it a try though.

Thanks
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Purple_TidderCommented:
I agree with dlongan.  The drive is being seen by the controller, but sounds like it's not getting past initialization of the drive.  But, do give it a try.  Also, this sounds stupid, but once you get your stuff ready to read the drive, freeze your drive before hand.  You'd be suprised at how many drives I was able to resurrect for a few minutes to save data with this technique.
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kandersenAuthor Commented:
Hmmm. never heard of that "Purple" If it doesn't work could that cause other issues? Possibly condensation within the case?
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Purple_TidderCommented:
Hasn't happened to me.  Drives are sealed, there is really no way for moisture to get inside, unless you open it...

But I've only used this on IDE drives, notebook drives, and one SATA drive.  I've never tried on a SCSI drive, but I see no difference.  I'd say maybe use it as last resort if you can't get anything else going for you and professional data recovery is no option.
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Purple_TidderCommented:
last post on this one about freezing:
http://www.experts-exchange.com/Storage/Q_21277477.html

Couple of posts here about freezing:
http://www.experts-exchange.com/Storage/Q_20516536.html

Mentioned briefly here:
http://www.experts-exchange.com/Operating_Systems/WinXP/Q_21249046.html

Mentioned here a wee bit:
http://www.experts-exchange.com/Hardware/Q_20679187.html

As you can see, it's usually a last resort type of deal, but I usually try it.  And about 1 out of 3 times it works.
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dlonganCommented:
The freeze method has reportedly worked, but I haven't been successful.

BTW, all hard drives have air inlets (with filters) to equalize air pressure, so moisture is a problem when you rapidly change temperatures.  The heads fly VERY VERY VERY close to the disk surface and any amount of moisture or any other contaminate will cause future failure.
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Purple_TidderCommented:
Uhh... usually when you freeze a drive, it's already dead right?  So future failure??  Anyway, good to know, I always thought drives were sealed, but come to think of it, I've always seen those little filter things inside and wondered what they did...

Thanks for the correction.
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dlonganCommented:
My comment regarding "future failures" was really a general comment, lots of folks leave laptops in cars overnight or when you have a new system shipped and climate is cold.  You should allow the computer to come up to room temperature (slowly) before turning them on.

Also freezing the drive could cause the heads to crash, and this could almost kiss any chance of a data recovery service getting data off the platters (yes - depends on the severity of the crash).
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kandersenAuthor Commented:
I had to send the drive in for Data Recovery. Thank You
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