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Using my Novell Netware configured computer on my Microsoft WinXP home network

Posted on 2005-04-23
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Last Modified: 2006-11-18
Hi there,
My company provides me with a laptop that is setup for novell netware networking.  Each time I turn it on, I need to sign into my computer (whether attached to the network or not) using a netware login.  I have a home network setup in my house, using simple microsoft networking tools available in windows xp. I would like to be able to access the printers in my home and do file sharing with my laptop, but I can find no way to access the home network.  I tried right clicking on my computer/properties/computer name and changing computer name, network ID and domain (thinking I could change it back later) and this totally screwed up my netware configuration and our IT department spent quite a bit of time getting my computer reconfigured properly.

So does anyone have any solution to this problem, or is there no way I can print share and access other computers on my home network while have the netware stuff on my laptop?

Thanks,
Jaeson
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Question by:jaesonrosenfeld
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Expert Comment

by:billmercer
ID: 13852559
In order to access your windows network at home, you need to have the Windows networking client installed, and you need to assign your computer to a workgroup (not a domain) that matches the other resources on your network.

Having the Novell client installed doesn't inherently interfere with the ability to use Windows networking. I'm guessing your company has disabled the Windows networking protocols, which would prevent you from accessing your home network, or possibly blocked ports needed for Windows networking with a firewall. There's no technical reason why you shouldn't be able to use both Netware and Windows networking at the same time. I do it all the time. In fact, it's possible to have both types of networks running at the same time.

BUT...

You should NOT try to do this without the consent of your IT department. Ask them to help you with this. Explain what it is you want to do and ask them to help you configure it. If they refuse, it may be for good reasons. It could be some sort of performance or security concern, or it could just be a policy that must be followed, but since it's their laptop, they get to make the rules.

One thing you could suggest would be adding a second network interface to the notebook, and configuring it to use just Windows Networking. They might be more willing to help you with that, since it would be less likely to cause them problems.


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Expert Comment

by:ShineOn
ID: 13854627
Yeah, since it's a company asset, you should always work with your IT department on how it should and is permitted to be used.  No matter how careful you are or how well-protected your home environment might be, you must accept the simple fact that laptop users are pretty much now the biggest source of viruses, trojans and other malware getting into corporate networks, next to email.

Also realize that "simple file sharing" is meant for home use only, and the probability is that your IT department has disabled "simple file sharing" (and possibly any other kind of "sharing") because it interferes with business-class networking.  It should only show up in Explorer settings as "recommended" on XP Home edition, and on XP Pro it should say "NOT recommended" and should be off by default, IMHO.

If you have the Windows client installed already but "simple file sharing" is disabled, the only way you can access shared devices on your home network is to change the home network to use conventional (pre-"simple") peer-to-peer file and print sharing.  If you establish "real" sharing, and create an account on your home PCs for you to use to log into the home PCs to authenticate the shared devices, it will work.  It's possible even to have it work without joining your work laptop to your home "workgroup" domain that way, by browsing "my network places" looking in "entire network," then "microsoft windows network" it should show your home workgroup name, and if you don't see anything, you should be able to get there by searching for a computer IP address on your home network.
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Author Comment

by:jaesonrosenfeld
ID: 13890657
Hi Shine-on (and others),
I did follow your instructions at the end of your email.  I went to My Network Places/Microsoft Windows Network/

When I did this the only network/computer that showed up was called "ADS" (which is not the name of my home network). I double clicked on this and it said i did not have the rights to attach to this network.  I am assuming that this is a work network and since I am not currently attached to our work VPN, thats why I do not have the right to access it.  Anyways, my MSHome network does not appear.

I am interest in the peer-to-peer option you talk about.  Can you please provide more details? The computers on my home network are on a switch and have static IP addresses assigned...

One last remark, I am going to post the responses I received from my IT department about this topic below.   Thanks!!

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
IT department Response 2:
We just tried to re-create this here and there was no easy way to get it to work.  You need to add File and Print Sharing from the network connection and then can share added printers but there seems to be some further policy that is stopping the browsing of the added printer.  So in short there seems no easy way to do it as they have set policies to block it.

The way you may be fine and not have a problem is that you are sharing the printer on a non-McK computer.  Once the printer is shared on your home computer you can go into a browser and type in the IP of the computer that is sharing the printer and add it from there.  I can't give exact steps tho as we couldn't get it to work here.

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My Response 2:

I am not sure I need to turn on “print sharing” on my laptop.  The printer is connected to another computer on my home network. I need to access this printer through my home network. I do not mind if I have to do it each time – can you let me know how?

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IT Response 1:

Hi Jaeson,

The print sharing is turned off on our laptops as a policy set in the OS.  It is possible to turn it on but it will revert back to turned off when you log back in.

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My initial email:

Hi guys,
I have a home network using the MS Windows XP home network wizard.  I have print and file sharing enabled.  I would like to be able to access print sharing from my McKinsey laptop on my home network. It would improve the quality of my life greatly.  Can you guys let me know if there is a way to set this up without compromising my novell network settings?

Thanks,
Jaeson
 
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LVL 19

Expert Comment

by:billmercer
ID: 13891010
Hmm, doesn't sound like your IT person really even knows what policies are in place.
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Expert Comment

by:ShineOn
ID: 13891273
You need to turn on f/p sharing to share files or printers, not to attach to or access files or printers shared by other PC's.  All you need is the Microsoft client and the Workstations service running.  In that, they are correct.  

If all you want to do is to connect to the shared printer on your home network, you should be able to search for the IP address of the PC that is sharing the printer, and connect to it, as long as your user ID that you use to log into your PC is added as a user with access rights to the printer, to the Users and Groups settings on the PC that is sharing the printer.

If all of the other factors are all OK, and you can't see the home PC when you search for the IP address, you might a) have simple file sharing instead of regular sharing on, on your home network, or b) have a personal firewall on your work laptop that is blocking the NetBT ports, or both.

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Author Comment

by:jaesonrosenfeld
ID: 13898692
Hi there,
OK, i found the IP addresses of my machine and the one that the printer is attached.  Mine is 192.168.102.100 and the printer is attached to 192.168.102.101.   Print sharing is on and the other computers on the simple WinXP home network are all able to print to it.  When i type in the 192.168.102.101 into my browser, nothing shows up.  Could you please provide exact instructions how I would access this printer/machine. The MSHome network will not show up on my computer no matter what I try.  Please give very precise instructions because I am a rookie at this.

Thanks,
Jaeson
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Expert Comment

by:billmercer
ID: 13898994
Go to Start|Settings|Network Connections.
Find your Local Area Network connection, right click and choose Properties.
Do you see an entry labeled Client for Microsoft Networks?
If not, click Install, highlight the Client entry in the list, then click Add. Highlight Microsoft on the left side of the next dialog, then highlight the entry labeled Client for Microsoft Networks, then click OK.
Wait a minute, then look in Network Places under Entire Network, Microsoft Windows Network.




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LVL 35

Assisted Solution

by:ShineOn
ShineOn earned 500 total points
ID: 13899017
In Windows Explorer, on the tree pane, expand "My Network Places".  Expand "Entire Network".  Expand "Windows Network".

Do you see your home workgroup name listed?  If so, expand it.

Do you see the PC that has the printer shared?  If so, double-click it and see if the shared printer shows up or a "printers" folder appears.  If you can then see the printer, you can right-click it and select "connect."

OR,

Right-click "my network places" and select "search for computers."  Type in the computer name or the IP address of the computer with the printer and click "search."  If it doesn't find it by name it should find it by IP address.

When it shows up in the right pane, double-click it.  You should see the shared printer.  Right-click it and select "connect."

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Expert Comment

by:waybadmojo
ID: 13902555
What about creating a new profile on your NW Client that contains your home network credentials?
Then you can simply switch profiles when at home vs work....

-Mojo
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Accepted Solution

by:
BigBadFletch earned 500 total points
ID: 14048397
instead of using the browser and just putting the ip address try using windows explorer and type the following    \\192.168.102.101       the \\ is identifying that it is a server. just something to try. hopefully it will prompt you to provide a user name and password if one is set.
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Author Comment

by:jaesonrosenfeld
ID: 14284024
Hey guys,
Thanks for all the great advice and sorry for the slow response -- I was away for over a month and just got a chance to try this now. And it worked!  The key was using windows explorer and typing in the IP address of the computer -- for some reason the computers on my home network were not showing up under the windows network branch in Windows explorer. When I typed the IP address as shown in the last response into explorer, it prompted me for the windows login information, after I typed it I was able to install and print from the printer.

THANKS!

Best,
Jaeson
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