• Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 1751
  • Last Modified:

MONITOR PROBLEM...NOT SHARP (CRISP)...

I just got a new monitor about a week ago...

It's LG Flatron L1710s

I have a ATI Radeon 9800 PRO 128mb...

THe problem is...the texts are not as crisp, and sharp as the crt that I used before.

I know LCD isn't great compared to crt, but it's kind of worse than that....

I ran starcraft brood war, and things are not sharp, and they look kind of blurry.

Maplestory (online game) also...  it's definitely different quality from what i have expected...

My settings are 1024x768 (60hz) right now...

I'm not even pushing it that hard, and it's weird...

The Screen Names on AIM aren't crisp either...

Can someone tell me how i can fix this problem??

I'll upload a screenshot if I can...or if anyone needs to see wat's going on.

thanks...
0
besoulboy
Asked:
besoulboy
  • 8
  • 7
  • 4
  • +1
1 Solution
 
WatzmanCommented:

There is no guarantee that you can fix it, and the monitor may be defective.  I'd take it back.

From your description, it's out of focus.  There is SOMETIMES a focus adjustment, sometimes not.  It's not intended as a "user" adjustment, and if there is an external adjustment at all, it's likely to be a small round hole in the side (left side, usually) or back.  BE EXTREMELY CAREFUL if you want to try this and use a PLASTIC screwdriver, the focus adjustment is usually on the flyback transformer, and there is about 10 to 20 THOUSAND volts in that part of the monitor.  Very often, even if the adjustment does exist, you have to take the monitor covers off to get at it.

Problem is, the "best" focus that you can get might well be what you are looking at.  I would call that a defect.  There's a slim chance that it's significantly off and that a touch of a screwdriver would make it "sharp as a pin", but adjusting it voids the warranty, it's dangerous, and it might not help anyway, so all things considered, I'd return the monitor for repair or replacement.
0
 
besoulboyAuthor Commented:
the thing is...

when i'm playing like...nba live 2005 or nfs underground 2...

it has great quality....like there's nothing wrong with it...

runs perfectly smooth with no blurry spots...

i wonder if this info helps...
0
 
besoulboyAuthor Commented:
And when i'm playing starcraft, or maplestory...

i kind of noticed that the things are somewhat bigger than usual..

like if i see a person, it looks like it's stretched, and u no how u can see like the boxes at the edges...

it's like that...like when u expand an image...
0
Technology Partners: We Want Your Opinion!

We value your feedback.

Take our survey and automatically be enter to win anyone of the following:
Yeti Cooler, Amazon eGift Card, and Movie eGift Card!

 
r-kCommented:
Seems like you have it set at two low a resolution. That would explain the poor picture quality. That particular model should be set to 1280 x 1024 for best picture. See if that helps.
0
 
WatzmanCommented:

On text and things like Windows desktop, you will notice things that you would not notice when watching a movie or playing a game.  Also, as the resoltuion and refresh rates change, this can change the focus, which is derived from the horizontal output transformer.  And if the monitor is defective, you can get into scenarios like "blooming" where focus is lost depening on the scene itself.  It's very hard to troubleshoot this without seeing it, we are kind of "in the dark".
0
 
r-kCommented:
Watzman,

This is an LCD flat panel display.
0
 
WatzmanCommented:
OH ..........

THAT CHANGES EVERYTHING (Thanks, r-k, I missed that)

First, LCD display MUST be run ONLY at their native resolution.  If you try to run them at a higher or lower resolution, the display must be scaled and will be terrible.  For this monitor, as r-k indicated, it's 1280x1024.  NO OTHER RESOLUTION IS ACCEPTABLE for the Windows desktop.  For games & video (DVDs, etc.), it's not as critical.

Second, are you interfacing by analog (15-pin VGA interface) or digital DVI?  If you have a choice, digital DVI will give you a better picture.

Third, many of the cables that come with LCDs are not very good and can cause "ghosting" and "ringing".  Extension cables will almost always make this much worse.

If you are going to use an analog LCD monitor, you are doing yourself a disservice if you don't get the test pattern generator available at:

http://www.winsite.com/bin/Info?500000030936

And use it to properly set the dot clock.  After installation, select the leftmost of the 3 functions in the "Test" group and then check both check-boxes.  This is a very old Windows 3.1 program written in visual basic.  It runs under XP just fine.  You need VBRUN300.DLL (the Visual basic version 3 runtime DLL library), which it may or may not come with it depending on where you download it from.  This program is non-invasive, it's "installation" makes no changes to your registry or to any system components or files.  In fact, if you just unzip the program and double click the exe file, it will run fine without actual "installation" (the program and the help file need to be in the same directory, and VBRUN300.DLL needs to be available in Windows\System).

When you display this pattern, you should see an absolutely perfect and uniform field of alternating (but very, very fine) black and white vertical bars each only one single pixel wide.  If you see "moirĂ©" distortion, or smearing, your display isn't adjusted correctly.  Digital monitors (with DVI interfaces) will always be "perfect".  Analog monitors will usually show an initial moirĂ© distortion pattern until they are adjusted (dot clock frequency and phase).  In most cases, perfect adjustment can be achieved (and is "remembered" by the display), but in some cases you can't achieve this.  Note that the "auto" (auto-adjust) function on almost all analog LCD monitors gets "close" but usually does not get to the best possible adjustment.

This should help a lot.
0
 
besoulboyAuthor Commented:
I'm kind of lost with that program...

I don't know what to do...

I clicked on the buttons on the "test group" but...what am I actually doing?

because nothing happened...

and I tried to use the 1280 x 1024 but it didn't reallly work...and things are so small , i can't work with it....

I'll try to upload a screenshot...but i don't no how to...

please help...T__T

0
 
r-kCommented:
>>and I tried to use the 1280 x 1024 but it didn't reallly work...and things are so small , i can't work with it....
..................

Yes, they do look small, but here is what I do on my own display:

 Right-click on desktop -> Properties -> Settings -> Advanced -> General

and change the DPI setting to "Large (120 DPI)", then OK etc. and reboot.

This will increase the size of text while still keeping it sharp.

You will not best results from that LCD display unless you use it's native resolution (1280x1024).
0
 
r-kCommented:
(for Watzman):

It had me fooled for a minute, too. I think the use of the word Monitor is what does it! I like to say Display for LCD's. And then there's flat screen vs. flat panel :(
0
 
WatzmanCommented:

We can deal with the size issue later (it can be dealt with, straightforward, r-k has correctly told you how to adjust it), but the fact that thngs got small means that you were operating at the wrong resolution.

As to the CRT alignment program, you need to put up the one pixel wide alternating black and white vertical bar test screen.

1.  Run the program
2.  Select the leftmost of the 3 choices under the "test" group
3.  Put checks in both "mode" boxes
4.  Click on "hide" to make the control panel go away leaving you with a full-screen display (Esc will bring back the desktop)

Now, with the test pattern up, you should see a perfectly uniform screen of alternating black and white vertical bars. Since the bars are only one single pixel wide, they are VERY thin and it will be almost like a solid gray screen but it IS distinct vertical lines.  You will probalby, however, have moire distortion, possibly severe.

What you do at this point is adjust the MONITOR (in the monitor's on-screen menu and with it's own front panel buttons) to make the moire distortion go away and to make the display "perfect" (once you change the dot clock, you will instantly understand what you are doing.  ten seconds of experience is worth 100,000 words).

Start with the display's "auto adjust" function, which will usually get you "close" but not "exact".  Then, to get it "perfect", adjust the "dot clock" frequency and phase.  I can't give you exact instructions since every monitor is different, check the manual that came with your monitor.  Usually, once this is set, the monitor will "remember" the correct settings.  On most systems, you can get it perfect.  Adjust the dot clock frequency first, then the phase (if necessary).  Some monitors have 3 or 4 adjustments, a "coarse" and "fine" for both frequency and/or phase.  If you can't get it "perfect", try a different refresh rate on your video card.

By the way, on the size thing ... Once you get the monitor properly adjusted, things should be so clear that you will be comfortable working with things smaller than you are used to (although you may still want to adjust them to make them larger than the default).  LCD monitors have absolutely, litterally perfect "focus" and "convergence" (and I mean, literally "perfect", not "good" or "excellent", but PERFECT), and they have ZERO (0.00000000000000 ... ZERO) geometric distortion.  They are FAR better than CRT displays, but you have to use the native resolution, and ONLY the native resolution, and you have to get the "dot clock" adjustments perfect, and, also as I mentioned, poor quality cables can cause ghosts and ringing.  If you have monitor with digital inputs (DVI), and if you video card has a digital output, using a DVI connection completely eliminates both the dot clock and the cable quality issue, and truly is the "best" of all possible worlds.  I know you are worried about the size of things right now, but you can adjust the size independently of the resolution.  First, however, lets get the monitor and video card working right.
0
 
besoulboyAuthor Commented:
thank you watzman...

i finally got how to work that program, and now things are good...

i'm still running at 1024x786 but it looks perfect now...

everything is fine...

thank u again.
0
 
WatzmanCommented:

Believe me, you need to change to 1280x1024 resolution to get the best possible image (and you will have to readjust, or at least recheck, the dot clock adjustments).  Right now, you have 1024x768.  That has to be "scaled" to 1280x1024, because that IS the number of actual pixels on the screen.  Now scaling, say, 1024x768 to 2048x1536, well that would be easy, you just display every pixel twice horizontally and vertically.  But there is NO WAY to cleanly scale 1024x768 to 1280x1024, it can't be done without introducing distortions.  So you really do need to change the video card resolution to match the monitor (1280x1024), then if the size isn't right, you can adjust that to make things bigger, r-k correctly described the procedure for adjusting that in his post at 11:20am.
0
 
besoulboyAuthor Commented:
OH, U no what i found????

I found out wat is wrong!

I ran the game starcraft, and i went to the menu on the monitor to see the phase and stuff, and I saw the resolution there, and it showed like 640x480 at 60hz...

Then, i thought that's maybe why the images were like xploded looking...

but I can't figure out how I can fix this...

When I quit the game, and come back out to the desktop, it shows 1024x768 again...

Hmm......

I don't no...AHHHHH
0
 
WatzmanCommented:
The monitor is only showing you what kind of signal the computer is sending to it.  Your desktop is set to 1024x768, so when you are looking at the desktop, that's what the monitor will show.  The game is set to "old-style" VGA, 640x480, so that's what the monitor shows.  Everything is working right, but scaling a 640x480 image up to 1280x1024 is probalby not going to look very good.  Most games do not use the "desktop" settings, they set their own resolution.  If you can change it at all, you will have to change a game's resolution from within the game itself, in most cases.  Some games only have a single, fixed resolution that can't be changed.  Others may have a choice of resolution, but it may be limited (for example, you might have a choice of 640x480 or 800x600, but nothing higher (this isn't uncommon, in fact)).  It's not something you can control in the monitor, the monitor is just letting you know this "FYI".  The monitor itself is ALWAYS (no, none, ZERO exceptions) displaying 1280x1024.  If the signal being sent is different from that (lower OR higher), the monitor will "scale" the image to 1280x1024, BUT this scaling introduces lots of artifacts and distortions.  In a game, you may not be able to do anything about it, but for the desktop, please change the desktop to 1280x1024 and then adjust the size as described earlier by r-k (or I can give you more help if you need it).
0
 
besoulboyAuthor Commented:
it's kind of weird though... from my old computer that i had...the game was fine, and i actually went and checked it and it says 800x600 there...

oh, and how would you change the font size, icon size (also the ones on the taskbar), and stuff like that from 1280x1024???
0
 
WatzmanCommented:

CRT monitors have no physical pixel count or pixel size.  But LCDs do; they are made with a fixed number of pixels at a fixed size, and that is fixed and that's it.  They can't operate any other way.

I would not advise, at least not initially, changing the font size or icon size.  People do that, and you can, but it's the wrong way to deal with the issue of "things being too small".

The right way is to go into display properties (right click on blank area of desktop, then "properties").  THen settings and "advanced", then look in the "general" tab.  You will see a box called "DPI settings", select "custom" and you will get a box where you can change the screen image size.  THIS SCALES EVERYTHING, both fonts & icons and other things, and this is the "right" way to do it, or at least the right way to start.  You will have to "experiment" to find the setting that you want.

However, before you do this, let me make one suggestion:  change to 1280x1024, adjust the dot clock (using the test program), and live with it for at least a few hours.  With a properly adjusted LCD, the image is MUCH sharper than with most CRT monitors, and even though things are smaller, they are also still much clearer (remember, they have the same number of pixels that they had on the CRT).  You may find that you, at first, can live with it, and later, that you prefer it (you will see a LOT more of your documents, web pages, etc. on the screen).

Then, if you don't like it, try changing the "magnification" as described above.

[FYI, font and icons are in the display properties / Advanced / Appearance.  Fonts are right there (bottom box), icon sizes are under "effects" [checkbox - use large icons].  However, this is not the "right" way to make things bigger, and it will cause problems with some program and web site displays.]

0
 
besoulboyAuthor Commented:
what do u mean by adjusting the dot clock?

and how do u do that?
0
 
WatzmanCommented:

The dot clock is what you need to adjust to get rid of the moire distortion that you may see when you run the test pattern software.  There is normally a "frequency" and "phase" control.  This is on the monitor, and it's adjusted from within the monitor's on-screen menu.  Go back to my post from 11:55am yesterday morning.  They may or may not actually use the term "dot clock", but that's what you are adjusting.  It's also what the monitor attempts to adjust when you use the monitor's "Auto" function, but usually the Auto function doesn't get the adjustment exactly right.
0
 
skdcsupportCommented:
Incidentally, Starcraft is not a good test for an LCD, since it's native game resolution is 640x480, which is not scalable or able to change any higher. It is an old game and not one i'd recommend testing with.
0

Featured Post

Concerto Cloud for Software Providers & ISVs

Can Concerto Cloud Services help you focus on evolving your application offerings, while delivering the best cloud experience to your customers? From DevOps to revenue models and customer support, the answer is yes!

Learn how Concerto can help you.

  • 8
  • 7
  • 4
  • +1
Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now