ISA Server, does it go before or after Router?

Hello,

I just installed ISA server on a 2003 server network and I don't know if goes before or after my linkysys router.  Can somebody give me some router configurations for this setup...

thanks in advance...

chris
cyoung3000Asked:
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NetworkArchitekCommented:
The gateway for all the internal machines is the "internal side" network card of the ISA server. Of course the ISA's server gateway is the Linksys in your situation. Of course make sure you use the different IP subnets. So the the internal side could be "192.168.1.0" while the network between the ISA server and the Linksys could be "192.168.0.0." Hope this helps.
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NetworkArchitekCommented:
Well if your Linksys router is just acting as the PPPoE connection to your DSL modem or something like that then the ISA server goes "after" the Linksys. This basically means that the Linksys is your gateway to the Internet, and anything on that switch kind of becomes your DMZ. Then the ISA server plugs into it and the rest of the network (non DMZ) goes through it.  I would point out that you probably do not even need the Linksys router anymore, at least as the gateway to the internet.

If this isn't sufficient then if you post more information about your setup and your goal and I can give more clarification.
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cyoung3000Author Commented:
Hello,

Thanks for the reply.  I was hoping you could point me in the right direction.  I need to keep my linksys because it doubles as my phone line (vonage) so my question is, do I need a switch if my ISA server comes "after" the router?  I have 3 other machines ( a domain controller, XP pro workstation and Exchange 2K server) that are networked together through the router right now.  I'm new to ISA so if you have some quick tips on the best basic configuration and things to look for, I'd appreciate it.

thanks...
chris
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NetworkArchitekCommented:
All right, you will of course need to configure ISA but this one way to set it up, it makes the most sense for your situation. Note you need another switch or hub, assuming you just have a couple NICs in the ISA server:

         |-->Vonage                            |--->DC
Linksis|--------------->ISA|--->Switch|--------->Wkstn
                                                       |--->Exchange


Someone may still chime in that you could put the vonage behind the ISA but either way ... The ISA server is your new firewall so you can think of it as a more beefy version of the Linksys. You need all the nodes to be protected behind it and normally you would just connect them all to the switch and configure the DC, Wkstn, and Exchange to use the ISA as their default gateway. You can get as complicated as you want with it but I think this is sufficient.
Hope this helps.
 
         
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cyoung3000Author Commented:
Thanks for the post.  That's exactly what I was looking for as far as the "path" from internet to my machines.  One last question, just to get me started, as far as the gateway for internal machines, should that be Isa nic card 1 receiving from the "outside" or nic card 2 routing the signal "inside"?

thanks again,

chris
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cyoung3000Author Commented:
I forgot to ask the last time, is it better to use my linksys for DHCP or should I leave that up to my DC on the inside?  Or does the ISA become the new DHCP server?

thanks,

chris
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NetworkArchitekCommented:
Definitely want the DHCP to be on the side behind the ISA, so the DC is fine for that purpose. You could make the ISA server the DHCP server, it may be a better choice if you need DHCP when the DC may be down.
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cyoung3000Author Commented:
Thanks for the DHCP post.  Last question, just to get me started, as far as the gateway for internal machines, should that be Isa nic card 1 receiving from the "outside" or nic card 2 routing the signal "inside"?

thanks
chris
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