Switch setup

Hi,

I am setting up a dell 5324 switch. Can someone tell me what is VLAN LAG SETTINGS.

Thanks,

Donnie
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Donnie4572Asked:
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Gen2003Commented:
LAG is Link Aggregation Group. Like cisco's ether-channel. So you can aggregate number of physical ports into one logical thus increasing the bandwidth.
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harbor235Commented:
VLAN LAG ?? Can you provide more details?

harbor235
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ksearchCommented:
I don't know about VLAN LAG, but there is such a thing as VLAN TAG --tagging specifies which VLAN group packets belong to.  Is that perhaps what you meant?

For setup info on your device:

http://support.dell.com/support/edocs/network/pc5324/en/UG/switch.htm#1111518
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Donnie4572Author Commented:
Thanks for the link. Very informative.

No, it is VLAN LAG SETTINGS.

The site you provided says this but doesn't explain what the purpose is. Unless I'm missing something.

The VLAN LAG Setting page provides parameters for managing LAGs that are part of a VLAN. VLANs can either be composed of individual ports or of LAGs. Untagged packets entering the device are tagged with the LAGs ID specified by the PVID. To open the VLAN LAG Setting page, click Switch→ VLAN→ LAG Settings in the tree view.

Donnie
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ksearchCommented:
Link aggregation! That makes sense. I've got that on my Intel switches. We use it to double bandwith in spots.  It can also be used for failover. But i dont' have to manange my Link Aggregation ports or settings as part of a VLAN, which is why I thought you meant TAG and not LAG.   Good luck!
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Donnie4572Author Commented:
Thanks,

Is this used for switch to switch configuration?

Is it possible to use this for switch to server to increase bandwidth to server?

Donnie
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ksearchCommented:
To do it on a server, you manage it from the server.  Your server would need two compatible NIC's in it, and must be able to handle "teaming.   -- the nic's in essence become one with twice the bandwith. One IP address, but two NIC's.    I've got HP/Compaq servers and have a NIC team on one server that has high network utilization. Works great.  I use Link Aggregation between two switches (one in the main office, and one out back in the warehouse) to improve bandwidth and provide failover).

Hit the manufacturer's website for your server to see how they want you to set up NIC teams, and verify if your hardware is compatible.  Windows server 2003 may also handle NIC teaming, but you need to decide--is my OS going to manage this, or my server hardware? Only one can be in charge!  
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Gen2003Commented:
You can buy Intel Pro Series adapters, they provide teaming. But check with particular model. Also almost all modern servers support teming on emeeded adapters.

Regards.
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Donnie4572Author Commented:
Thanks for all good help. Does anyone know of a link to help set this up? Or can recommend a good book?
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ksearchCommented:
If you are doing the Link aggregation on the switch, then your switch manufacturer's website should have documentation (dell). If you are doing it from your server, then your server manufacturer should have documentation online, and of course if you go with teamed Intel Pro adapters, then intel has stuff online.  

There isn't really one place to go because it all depends on how you want to do it. But since online docs are free, read up on it from all three sides -- the switch, the server, and the nic. It may help you decide what you want.
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Donnie4572Author Commented:
Sorry, I thought I closed this. Thanks to all for your help.
Donnie
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