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Have IP address pass through

Posted on 2005-04-26
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Last Modified: 2010-04-10
I have a client who is using PC Anywhere through a router (ordinary Linksys 4 port) and I need to set it up so that the true IP address is shown on the computer, rather than the 192.168 bit.  PC Anywhere only sees it as the 192.168 so I'm assuming that it's a setting somewhere in the router.  I've tried experimenting, but every time I've messed up I've had to reset the router to get back in, so I'd rather have it straight for what to change.
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Question by:Ken_Goding
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by:pseudocyber
ID: 13870811
What do you mean "shown on the computer"?

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by:xrok
ID: 13871073
192.168.bit is Ip Address to Workstation by thier router. Not your Router.

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by:rburns50
ID: 13871285
a drawing may help...what you say doesn't make a lot of sense. If your workstation's local address is 192.168.x, and it passes through a  router to access another host via PCAnywhere, the only way it wouldn't show up on the remote end as coming from 192.168.x is if the router was NAT'ing the source address. You could turn off NAT, but it may make your connection to the remote end fail.

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by:Ken_Goding
ID: 13875688
I need the router to assign the true IP address and have it show up in the network connections as such.  I had tried checking the IP address by one of the sites online, and when I used the remote computer with PC Anywhere, it couldn't find that IP address.  Internally on the network it could find the 192.168 address and talk to the computer, but outside the network that is impossible.
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by:pseudocyber
ID: 13875757
You have to connect to the outside IP address and you have to forward the port to the internal NATted address.

You can find the outside address by looking in the Router's status screens, or go to a site like http://www.whatismyip.com and it will tell you.  Once you know the public IP address, you connect t it - after you've forwarded the ports to the internal IP.  You ought to have the internal IP low in the network, so it's outside the DHCP scope, so it doesn't change - and have it statically assigned on the machine.   So, if your DHCP starts with .100 then you could do a static assignment of .50 on the pc in question.

For PC anywhere, you would forward ports 5631 and 5632.  If you used my example above, you'd forard these ports to 192.168.1.50.  Then, when an outside device tries to connect with PCAnywhere to your public IP address, the router forwards the appropriate ports to the correct internal IP.
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by:Ken_Goding
ID: 13878515
Ok... I think I can follow that.  I'll see when I can get there to try it.
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by:rburns50
ID: 13882049
Good luck...I'm still lost. I saw the question as the opposite of what pseudocyber was addressing. I thought you were using a PC behind a router (PCAW client) to access a PCAW host, and you wanted the PCAW host to see the connection coming from an IP address that wasn't the local one on the PCAW client. The only way to do this is using NAT at the router in front of the PCAW client. If you are going out to the Internet to access the PCAW host, NAT should be on by default- otherwise, you wouldn't get there.

I like pretty pictures..sorry if I am confusing you with my confusion.
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by:Ken_Goding
ID: 13893941
I guess I'm going to need detailed instructions on how to go about all this.  I don't know routers well enough to just do it.  I messed around with it last night and didn't get too far... but at least didn't lock myself out this time.
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pseudocyber earned 500 total points
ID: 13894014
Step, 1.  On the target machine, you need to create a Static IP address.  You go into Network Properties, go to local area connection, properties, then tcp/ip properties.  You do NOT want the machine to obtain an address dynamically, you want to assign one.  You want to assign on below your DHCP scope that is configured in your router.  If its default, it probably starts assigning from .100 and up.  So, you could choose an unused IP like .50.  So, if your network is 192.168.1.0 and the mask is 255.255.255.0 then you could assign your PC 192.168.1.50 mask 255.255.255.0 with a default gateway of 192.168.1.1.  Note, since you're assigning these, you're going to need to copy the DNS information out of one that gets it automatically and enter it manually into the static machine.

Step 2.  On the linksys - log in to the administration page by going to 192.168.1.1 and entering the password.

Step 3.  On mine (A WRT54G with HyperWRT v3.03.6 firmware) I go to Applications & Gaming.  Then on the "Port Range Forward" page in the Application column, I type PCAny and the Start I put 5631 and the end I put 5632.  The protocol I select BOTH for the heck of it.  The IP Address I put 192.168.1.50.  I check the Enable box.  And it's done.

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by:Ken_Goding
ID: 13897881
I wonder if I have to upgrade the firmware, that may be part of it... the saga shall continue lol!  You'll get the points though. :)
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by:pseudocyber
ID: 13898259
No prob. :)  You should have the capability in whatever firmware you're using - I only mentioned that because my screens may be slightly different.
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by:Ken_Goding
ID: 13935443
I haven't had the chance to finish it off, but you deserve your points. :)
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