XP won't read hard drive, Win98 & DOS will.

I have an odd hard drive problem.  Recently, my primary hard drive quit working.  Upon starting my PC, XP will begin to load and then just reboot.  I moved it to another PC as a secondary drive and it says the drive is not formatted.  (This PC is also running XP). I tried running Norton Disk Doctor (the 2005 version) and it says it can't examine the drive because there is no valid file system.

Here's the odd thing...  Since the drive was FAT32, I decided to boot from a DOS diskette.  DOS reads the drive with no problem.  All my files are there.  I also made the questionable drive a secondary drive on a PC running Windows 98, and it reads the drive fine as well.

Why can't XP read it...  even as a second drive?  Anyone have a clue?
JABrownAsked:
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BILJAXConnect With a Mentor Commented:
sorry to hear that.  That teaches all of us a lesson that data backup is crucial.


AC
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ridConnect With a Mentor Commented:
Interesting. I have heard that XP gets these fits with floppies that have an error in the media descriptor byte; older windows and DOS don't bother with this. Perhaps this is an analogy... You'd have to use something like Norton Diskedit to view and possibly rectify this condition. A full backup is recommended, of course, before trying anything like that...
/RID
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eatmeimadanishConnect With a Mentor Commented:
There are two possible solutions, the first is to go into administrative options / computer management and write a signature to the drive.  The second problem could be a result in a bad partition information or corrupted fat, sometimes as a result of a drive overlay.  Overlays are used by older computers to access larger hard drives then there bioses could support.  There is a chance that you have an overlay on the disk and not even know it.  

http://www.storagereview.com/guide2000/ref/hdd/bios/overDDO.html

http://www.wdc.com/service/FAQ/ezdrive.html#lba
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JABrownAuthor Commented:
I doubt it's an overlay.  I partitioned this drive right out of the box using fdisk and then format (thus the FAT32).

But concerning writing a signature, how would I do that?  I've gone to Admin Tools, Computer Mgmt, Storage, Disk Mgmt.  The drive shows up, but I don't see any options to write a signature.  Of course, there is no operating system listed for this drive and it shows as 100% available.  I've already pulled my important files off the drive (using Windows 98) so it doesn't really matter if I trash it.  It's more curiosity than anything else at this point.
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JABrownAuthor Commented:
By the way, this drive is a Maxtor, 80-gigabyte.  The PC's that I'm using are P-III and P4, so the BIOS's don't have any issues recognizing the drive. (All the more reason I don't think it's an overlay issue).
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hex4def6Connect With a Mentor Commented:
Have you tried running scandisk in dos? might be worth a try.
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PCBONEZConnect With a Mentor Commented:
XP has a bunch of odd ball copy write protectio feature MS built in. This might be why it won't read in the XP system as a second drive.

I suspect your mastr boot record has gone amuck.

Put in a system and boot form a Win98 start up CD.
(make sure it has FDISK and SCANDISK on it.)
Add to it the file "sys.com" from an XP system.
Copy FDISK.EXE to the C drive.
Change to the C prompt.
Type in "fdisk /mbr" and hit enter.
This procedure rebuilds the Master Boot Record.
Now use Fdisk to set the boot partiition as "active".
Back to the A: prompt type in "sys C:" and hit enter..

My syntact may be a little off as I'm not 'with it' today but I think you have enough going on to get what I'm saying.
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BILJAXCommented:
Run Windows Repair off the windows XP cd.




Ac
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WatzmanConnect With a Mentor Commented:

I would take advantage of the fact that you can read it under Windows 98 and get my files off of them, then repartition the drive under XP.
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nobusConnect With a Mentor Commented:
here is a list of commands to try (but backup first)


FIXMBR C:
FIXBOOT C:

bootcfg /disable
COPY x:\I386\NTLDR C:\
COPY x:\I386\NTDETECT.COM C:\
BOOTCFG /rebuild
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MrBillisMeConnect With a Mentor Commented:
I don't know the answer to your question but I would not trust this drive again. Since you took it out of the box, after you get data off of it, go to the Maxtor site and check the warantee status and if under warantee get a RMA. I just had a 40GB Maxtor from year 2001 go bad and the warantee ran out in Feb this year, missed it by ... that much.
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PCBONEZCommented:
If the drive works in Win98 the drive works and the problem is MICROSOFT..
Pardon me, just venting...
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JABrownAuthor Commented:
Thanks for all the comments!  Sorry so slow to respond. I've been out of town and haven't had access to e-Mail or Internet.  Also, will not be back at this particular computer until tomorrow.  But to answer some of the replies...

I have tried the XP repair from the CD.  It says the drive is not formatted and then offers to format it. (Not what I'm looking for)!

I have not tried scandisk in DOS, but I did try Norton Disk Doctor in DOS, and it started scanning with no problems, but then produced a stack overflow error midway through the FAT scan.

I'll try some of the other suggestions when I'm back at work tomorrow.

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JABrownAuthor Commented:
Here's where I've gotten...

I tried FDISK /mbr but that didn't change anything.
I couldn't find sys.com on an XP system. I think it's only a DOS/Win9x command?

I also tried the following as referenced above:
FIXMBR C:
FIXBOOT C:
bootcfg /disable
COPY x:\I386\NTLDR C:\
COPY x:\I386\NTDETECT.COM C:\
BOOTCFG /rebuild

The drive recognizes now, but the only files it sees are ntdetect.com and ntldr.  Even in DOS, these are the only files shown on the drive.  Also, XP now lists the drive as only 10Meg capacity using FAT (not FAT32).  I'm going to conclude the drive is hosed now.

Thanks anyway for all the suggestions.  At least I was able to salvage anything important before things went further downhill.
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ridCommented:
It would be intersting to know if a "zero-fill" could bring the drive back into a useful state (after creating new partitions etc). It sounds like a logical error, unless of course the drive says 10 MB in the BIOS drive detection, too....
/RID
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JABrownAuthor Commented:
I'm going to go ahead and close this, and split points among those who gave comments.
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