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File System Security

Hi
Which one is more Secure ?
Linux File System Or Windows File System?
thnx
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entrance80
Asked:
entrance80
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1 Solution
 
al-hasanCommented:
entrance80: Linux is an operating system, and Windows claims to be the same. File systems are supported by both, f.ex. FAT, NTFS (in the case of Windows); ext2, ext3, reiserfs, xfs, fat (in case of Linux). But there is nothing like 'the Linux file system' or 'the Windows file system'. Now please specify your question. Each of the file systems has its advantages and disadvantages, and I would not claim one is 'more secure' than another one. Some are more stable, others are more useful with huge chunks of data, again others are better suited to find data faster.

Does this lead you a step further?
Regards,
has.
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martinez719Commented:
Actually, LINUX is more secure due to the number of Viruses targeted at the Windows OS. Check out the following link.
Good luck.

http://www.theregister.co.uk/security/security_report_windows_vs_linux/
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mkbeanCommented:
Martiniez719,

That really has nothing to do with the question.  The question was more geared toward the files system and not the OS as a whole.

Entrance80,
Both LINUX and some Windows Operating Systems have the ability to secure files and folders locally and over the network.  I guess we would all need more info on what you are trying to do.  Both LINUX and Windows provide great Operating Systems that by default can have security holes.  Please don't think that LINUX is always secure...no computer plugged into a network is secure.

Brian
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martinez719Commented:
Well excuse me for tryin to help, Brian.
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easymageCommented:
I belive Martinez answer was a good one.
the question was which is more secure linux file system or windows. and viruses are a major SECURITY threat and if you look really there are many more viruses designed for windows rather than linux.
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mkbeanCommented:
I agree that there may be more viruses geared toward Microsoft than LINUX but how many viruses do you know that target the NTFS file system?  I can think of none and it is a question geared to file system security.  I'm not trying harp on anyone but I want to make sure we stick to the question that was asked.

Brian
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martinez719Commented:
Thanks easymage!  Maybe I missed the target, but I took a shot.  I appreciate your well received comment.
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martinez719Commented:
Windows vs. Linux Design

Many, if not most of the viruses, Trojans, worms and other malware that infect Windows machines do so through vulnerabilities in Microsoft Outlook and Internet Explorer. To put the question another way, given the same type of desktop software on Linux (the most often used web browsers, email, word processors, etc.), Are there as many security vulnerabilities on Linux as Windows?

Windows Design
Viruses, Trojans and other malware make it onto Windows desktops for a number of reasons familiar to Windows and foreign to Linux:

1.Windows has only recently evolved from a single-user design to a multi-user model
2.Windows is monolithic, not modular, by design
3.Windows depends too heavily on an RPC model
4.Windows focuses on its familiar graphical desktop interface


Reference:http://www.theregister.co.uk/security/security_report_windows_vs_linux/#myth1
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al-hasanCommented:
martinez719: I share your view, too, and your link is great. And now it would be nice to hear from  entrance80 about what he had in mind when asking the question in such a very general way. Then we all could work towards the answer he expects.

Regards,
has.


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entrance80Author Commented:
thnx for all the answers .
I want to know more about File systems which are used in linux and windows (their advantages and disadvantages) so that i can choose a suitable one  for different application.

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al-hasanCommented:
entrance80: good to receive your feedback. Guess we need combined efforts to detail you about all. Some first steps from my side:

Windows uses mainly two file systems:  FAT and NTFS in different flavors (i.e. FAT32 can handle larger partition sizes than FAT could do, NTFS5 is the later one, used with Server 2003 and 2000/XP, while the NTFS4 had few less capabilities in NT4 times).

Linux can run on different file systems, the predominant ones are ext2, ext3, reiserfs, jfs and maybe xfs. It would run on FAT too, but this is not recommended.

There is a huge difference between FAT, NTFS and ext2 on one side and the other ones mentioned: if you write data and the computer crashes for whatever reason, the open file's data is usually lost, corrupted. Not so with the so-called journaling filesystems like ext3, reiser etc. - they first write a log (journal) like: this data will be written onto hard disk 3 onto block 1283. After the data is written, the log is checked and deleted, if all went correct. In case of a crash, the log would still be intact and there would be a note 'data not yet written', so it will be done upon restart. So these journaling file systems do have advantages. A small disadvantage is the reduced writing speed and the space they need to keep the journal, both are not relevant in my view.

Other file systems like f.ex. xfs have advantages if you have huge data which you must move often and fast, like multimedia data during production, on special and expensive workstations. There will be not any noticeable difference for you at the home computer, so I would suggest you using ext3 or reiser for linux and FAT or NTFS for the Windows world.

If you like to access data from Windows in your linux system, you can read both filesystems there, but write only onto FAT. And if you want to access linux data from Windows, you should stick with ext2 as there is a free driver available:
http://www.fs-driver.org/download.html
This works with NT4, Windows 2000 + XP, but not with 2003. It should work as well with ext3, at least reading goes flawless.

So far some practical information, hope it is useful. Theorectial differences may be written by some other experts, hope they have time.

Regards,
has.
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