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Server hard Drives Vs Pc hard drives

I want to install a new hard drive to my server. I am looking online for new 250 gig hard drives. Are there any difference between a server hard drive and a PC hard drive?

The reason why I am asking is because I want to run a software package off the new drive and multiple users will be accessing the drive at any given time. Can a PC hard drive handle this?

Simple question-Are they the same or not. If not what is the difference?  
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rday001
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rday001
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1 Solution
 
dis1931Commented:
A PC hard drive can handle it, most of these issues are dealt with by software.

A server hard drive can be different such as being a SCSI hard drive which provides more speed normally as well as faster transfer rates through the cable.  They are more expensive.  They are better but there is usually not much of an option.  Most real servers will only take SCSI drives and don't really have space for a regular hard drive.  If you are looking at ATA drives then no there is really no difference other than the RPM on the drive basically equates to speed.

I guess what I am trying to say is that a PC hard drive will not fit into a real server.  What i mean by real is an actual server not just a PC running as a server.  Servers usually have scsi, raid, redundant devices, usually have monitoring features such RILO cards for remote monitoring and administration.  If you have more specifics I can be of more help.
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
I would suggest reading over this:
http://www.dewassoc.com/kbase/hard_drives/scsi_vs_ide.htm

Note:  I have used ATA/IDE hard drives in a frequent use situation where the drive was constantly being written to.  6 months later the drive failed.  Now every drive will eventually fail - they have moving parts.  But SCSI hard drives are usually what is used in high use servers and the failure rates for them should be noteably lower.
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rindiCommented:
In a server you usually use SCSI disks, which run at 15000rpm and are therefore faster than IDE or Current SATA disks. These SCSI disks are usually very much more expensive than normal disks. Also most servers don't have one large disk, but many smaller disks in a raid 5 configuration. In raid five you need at least 3 disks, of which you loose the capacity of one. The rest add up to an array. In such a configuration, the more disks you have, the faster is your access, as the data gets accessed on all drives at the same time. Another advantage using raid 5 is on of your disks can break down, and you still have access to all data, you just have to replace the bad drive before another breaks, and it'll take some time for the array to rebuild once replaced. With modern raid controllers you can change the disks while the Server is running, so there isn't any disruption of your work.

Disks built for servers will normally last longer, have longer warranty, but are also noisier than the general desktop drive. You can get pretty good SATA raid systems these days, which can also be pretty fast (get pci express or pci x adapters. For that you'll need a current mainboard).
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dis1931Commented:
SCSI drives are meant for such high use situatioins but I have used regular ATA/IDE drives in other situations that required file sharing for multiple users and as application install servers or ghost servers and they have worked fine even in using the hard drive fairly constantly and for long stretches of time and I have not had failure problems.  But these were not situations where I cared if hard drives failed cause it could be re-created in a day or less.  If you are looking for fault tolerance I would suggest SCSI drives with RAID configuration but you are also talking lots more in price but well worth it for imortant data.
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tfjeffCommented:
depends on what type of server you have, as mentioned, most (higher end) servers use scsi drives and lots of the higher end servers don't even have a place to plug in a sata or ide drive OR a place to put one of these drives inside the case. some of the lower end servers use ide or sata drives though....so the type of hard drive you need would really depend on what type of server you have.
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dis1931Commented:
The lower end servers that do use ide/sata hard drives use drives that are no different than a desktop hard drive that uses ide or sata.
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bilbusCommented:
ou will be fone with IDE drives.
If you want a better drive, go buy a WD raptor that runs at 15000RPM.

Scsi is best, but you will live with IDE
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tfjeffCommented:
as far as I knew raptors ran at 10k...if there are 15k raptors out, please post a link.
jeff
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
I concur - I've never seen an ATA/SATA drive running at 15K.  The raptors are the fastest I've seen at 10K

SCSI has 15K.
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dis1931Commented:
Here is a link to the quality of the raptor hard drives

http://www.technewsworld.com/story/34202.html
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tfjeffCommented:
I own a 10k raptor, but was hoping for a 15k, didn't think they existed ;)
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rindiCommented:
In the link above, it still is a 10k drive, but in the tests it outperforms a 15k SCSI drive.
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tfjeffCommented:
think they benchmarked it against U160 or U320 drives though?  Probably not U320s.  The article doesn't seem to say
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
You can't trust benchmarks that don't give all the details.
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