Fiber Cabling

I'm looking at putting in converters to go from Fiber to CAT 5 cabling.  The specifications differences of 850nm, 1300nm, etc. affect what?  Do they just give longer distance, or do they have something to do with the speed at which the network will run?
kellysmith120Asked:
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harbor235Commented:
> So it moves faster if the number is higher, then?

I would not put it that way, but, it does allow for more data to be moved in a given time.

> So 850nm or 1300nm could both run at 100 Mbps or even Gig, the 1300 nm would just be able to handle more of it?

Keep in mind that there are other types of network interfaces such as GigE, 10 GigE, etc that require higher frequency wavelengths to transfer
larger amounts of data, but for 100M 850nm would suffice. I am not sure what your future needs are but if I were going to run fiber and there was a potential
more capability in the future I would run the better fiber.

> It doesn't make any difference on the length that the fiber can be run?

It does make a difference depending on the type of fiber, multi-mode or single mode. Also core size, and bandwidth come into play.

Check out this Cisco doc:

http://networking.smsu.edu/general/info/CiscoGBIC.htm


harbor235

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harbor235Commented:
The difference is the max wavelength of the signal that the fiber can handle, essentially the higher the wavelength the more bandwidth the fiber can potentially handle. So your answer is more bandwidth potential.

harbor235
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kellysmith120Author Commented:
So it moves faster if the number is higher, then?  So 850nm or 1300nm could both run at 100 Mbps or even Gig, the 1300 nm would just be able to handle more of it?  It doesn't make any difference on the length that the fiber can be run?
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