Want to protect your cyber security and still get fast solutions? Ask a secure question today.Go Premium

x
?
Solved

Wireless setup

Posted on 2005-05-03
7
Medium Priority
?
405 Views
Last Modified: 2013-11-09
Hey all,

I am thinking about purchasing the linksys WRT55AG wireless router.  I am setting up a hot spot.  My question is what is the difference (in detail) between a wireless router and a wireless access point?  

We have a large building with 2 floors, and an outdoor space that we want to cover.

I am thinking of connecting the router to the lan.  Will that provide an area of coverage by itself?  In other words, does the router provide the coverage and then the access points are like repeaters to expand the coverage?

Do I need the router, or could I just do it with access points?

We want to buy one piece of equipment and then ascertain the coverage area and spread out in a circle from there with additioanal equipment as needed, until we have the entire area covered.

Also, how do I keep everything beyond the router from accessing my lan.  And do I set it up as DHCP server?  I just want to provide internet access to laptops.

Thanks
0
Comment
Question by:jmcnear
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • +1
7 Comments
 
LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:ernes
ID: 13918155
A wirelss access point adds wireless capability to an existing network. It does not share your Internet connection between multiple computers.
A wireless router will share your internet connection, add wireless, and act as a firewall. If you already are sharing your Internet connection with a wired Internet router then you may want to just add a wireless access point.

Set up the access point with a static IP and set the gateway to be the address of your router. Now, if you want to seperate the wireless connection so that those people cannot access your network then you should get a router that is on a different subnet that acts as a DHCP. So you have to decide; if you really don't want the wireless users to be able to access your network (access the shared folders available to everyone) then go with a router and set it up on a different subnet.

Does it make sense?
0
 
LVL 8

Assisted Solution

by:Marakush
Marakush earned 200 total points
ID: 13918178
You can just use and AP rather then a router if your infrastructure is currently configured and working fine... and security really isn't a concern.

Remember an AP is just that, its just like a CAT5 wall jack.

If you want to add encryption or something like a RADIUS server to AUTH users then you need a router, which can pass the parameters to the wireless users

Marakush
0
 
LVL 1

Assisted Solution

by:ernes
ernes earned 400 total points
ID: 13918208
Or better yet, set up the access point as a DHCP that is on a different subnet. Let the AP give out IP's on a 255.255.0.0 subnet instead of the 255.255.255.0 subnet.
0
Industry Leaders: We Want Your Opinion!

We value your feedback.

Take our survey and automatically be enter to win anyone of the following:
Yeti Cooler, Amazon eGift Card, and Movie eGift Card!

 
LVL 8

Expert Comment

by:Marakush
ID: 13918280
ernes,

Depends on the AP, lets take a motorola AP, the only thing this AP will do is act as a pass thru to the DHCP server on the network, it will not assign anything itself.

Marakush
0
 

Author Comment

by:jmcnear
ID: 13918332
ok, cool, but how would i set the wireless router up as a different subnet?

Would I CAT5 connect the wireless router to the existing LAN, and then just give the router a static IP of 10.1.x.10 where my existing network is 10.1.y.10 ?

Will the router then hand out ip's to all the laptops under the correct subnet?

can i do that?

0
 
LVL 27

Accepted Solution

by:
pseudocyber earned 1400 total points
ID: 13918345
>>I am thinking about purchasing the linksys WRT55AG wireless router.  I am setting up a hot spot.  My question is what is the difference (in detail) between a wireless router and a wireless access point?  

An AP is a bridge - think of it as adding a switch to your network with a crossover - you've just added X amount of ports to your EXISTING network, as if they were plugged into a switch.  A router is intended to ROUTE between two networks - the router can connect to your existing network on it's WAN port and then create a private network on its LAN side.  Neither one of these solutions will keep anyone connecting to the router from accessing your network.

>>We have a large building with 2 floors, and an outdoor space that we want to cover.

You're probably going to need overlapping AP's on each floor - you'll need to plan them so their channels DO NOT overlap.  So, you'll have channel 1 and 5 on floor 1 with channels 3 and 7 above them on floor 2.

>>I am thinking of connecting the router to the lan.  

You would have to, or run a parallel network connection - we do this - we've got a couple DSL lines which are NOT ON OUR NETWORK and run them to the AP's.

>>Will that provide an area of coverage by itself?  In other words, does the router provide the coverage and then the access points are like repeaters to expand the coverage?

Yes, or you could use rotuers as AP's by plugging in the network connection into a LAN port instead of a WAN port.  Sometimes, believe it or not, the economics work out so the routers are  cheaper than the AP's.

>>Do I need the router, or could I just do it with access points?

Either - see above.

>>We want to buy one piece of equipment and then ascertain the coverage area and spread out in a circle from there with additioanal equipment as needed, until we have the entire area covered.

Good plan.  Or you could wire up your locations and then use the one router/AP and move it around and then walk around with a signal strength analyzer like netstumbler http://www.netstumbler.com/downloads/ and plan out where you need the AP's.

>>Also, how do I keep everything beyond the router from accessing my lan.  And do I set it up as DHCP server?  I just want to provide internet access to laptops.

I would recommend doing what we're doing with a TOTALLY SEPERATE INTERNET ACCESS from a DSL or Cable provider.  Then, if our users want to access our LAN then they can use VPN to do it - that takes care of the authentication and encryption without you having to put in expensive infrastructure to do it yourself internally.  So, if you do that make sure you have ONE DHCP SERVER - which could be a router if you're using SOHO gear.

On the other hand, if you want to nail it down, you cretate a WIRELESS VLAN(s) which all your wireless devices plug into.  They're all on part of a firewall.  Then, you allow those networks to your internet connection, through your firewall.  If you want to let them into the LAN, you need some kind of authentication and encryption control - such as VPN or Extensible Authentication Protocol (EAP) or 802.1x.

Hope this helps.

0
 
LVL 27

Expert Comment

by:pseudocyber
ID: 13918402
PS, forgot to mention Power Over Ethernet.  You should probably put the routers in the ceiling if you have dropped cielings (with grids and tiles) - this prevents them from "walking off" and gives you better coverage.  If you do that, they'll all need electricity ... UNLESS ... you do Power Over Ethernet.  You can get WAP/Routers with it built in, or you can purchase adapters to provide it to the devices.  Linksys' is right here: http://www.linksys.com/products/product.asp?grid=36&scid=47&prid=582 WAPPOE.  Now to do this, you'll ALSO NEED switches which have POWER OVER ETHERNET built in - and they naturally cost more than those that don't - UNLESS you use the adapters I described above, which can inject power into the Ethernet connection.

Hope this helps.
0

Featured Post

Get your problem seen by more experts

Be seen. Boost your question’s priority for more expert views and faster solutions

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

This article is a collection of issues that people face from time to time and possible solutions to those issues. I hope you enjoy reading it.
During and after that shift to cloud, one area that still poses a struggle for many organizations is what to do with their department file shares.
Michael from AdRem Software outlines event notifications and Automatic Corrective Actions in network monitoring. Automatic Corrective Actions are scripts, which can automatically run upon discovery of a certain undesirable condition in your network.…
Monitoring a network: how to monitor network services and why? Michael Kulchisky, MCSE, MCSA, MCP, VTSP, VSP, CCSP outlines the philosophy behind service monitoring and why a handshake validation is critical in network monitoring. Software utilized …

580 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question