2000 Server C: drive space running out

I have a Windows 2000 Server with a 40Gb hard drive partitioned to 4Gb c: drive and ~36Gb E: drive

I thought 4Gb would be plenty!

I have ~350Mb of space left on C: and have done everythning I can to increase space

Is there a way to shrink e: and expand c: ?

If not, can I move the swap file to E: ?

Any other bright ideas, sparky?

Thanks
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hgj1357Asked:
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
Anything resizing partitions COULD create massive problems. If you wanted to do that, I would suggest doing a full backup - including SYSTEM STATE, then get another hard disk.  Install Windows there on a larger partition.  Then do a restore.

Any time you mess around resizing partitions you run the risk of losing data - So you have to have a good backup anyway.  By using the method I describe above, you don't touch your original disk and if something doesn't work, you can always put that disk back and have a running system.

Besides, you would need 3rd party software to resize the drive.  Ghost/Drive Image can detect server OSs and won't resize those.  Acronis MIGHT work, but otherwise, you could end up having to get expensive software to do this.
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
YES, move the pagefile to another disk.  Do this in the System Control panel, Advanced Tab, Performance Options, Advanced Tab, "Virtual Memory" section - click the "Change" button.  Set the C: drive to 0 (min and max) and the E: drive to whatever you want (preferrably at least as much as recommended).
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hgj1357Author Commented:
Thanks. What about the partition resize?

H
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jonyeltonCommented:
Partition Magic works great, not sure if it will work with a server though.  Check the requirements.
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m0bovCommented:
Hi, get a copy of Partition Magic and something like Ghost Server edition. Use Ghost to make an image of your server to another HD or a USB hard disk. Then resize your c: to say, 10Gb. If you lose anything, you can ghost it back.

Or

Just use ghost to do a "disk to disk", so from your 40Gb to say a 120Gb, Ghost can make changes to your disk size as its Ghosting.

You could continue to use your 40Gb as a back up drive or to store data on or something.


James
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