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Trying to create a VPN connection from office to home

I have an office networked PC in the office using XP pro and a home pc on 2k Pro

I have been through the VPN setup in xp and asked my colleague to go to command and type IP config for the home PC  broadband connection.  Then created the VPN dial-up on the screen.

But using the correct Broadband IP address and home PC username and password it will not connect and give an "error 800"

I have reomoved the software firewalls such as zonealarm and at home all I have is a network of 3 pcs using a 5 port d-link switch but nothing obvious to stop this.

However, when you create a basic LAN and want to shar files you usually have to share files or map a drive but I have not done this, so have I missed like 3 stages out of the set-up?

I guess from the XP pc all I have to do is create a connection, but from the 2k pc that im trying to access what do I have to do?

Cheers

Mat
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auraorange
Asked:
auraorange
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1 Solution
 
plemieux72Commented:
You need to be able to connect to a global IP address at your home.  Do each of your 3 PCs have public, routable-over-the-Internet, IP addresses?  
If the IP addresses are 10.x.x.x, 172.16-31.x.x or 192.168.x.x, you won't be able to connect to them.

Also, I don't think XP has an integrated VPN server built in but I could be wrong.  I think you need Windows Server 2003 or Windows 2000 Server for that... but I always use VPN routers to accomplish what you want as it's a lot easier.

A possible solution would be to obtain a broadband router that can terminate a VPN tunnel on its outside interface connected to the Internet (using its global IP address).  This way, you'd connect to that one address and then have access to the entire home network remotely, and not just one PC.

Some VPN-capable routers for small offices, home offices:
Cisco SOHO 91
Cisco PIX 501
Cisco 870 series
Linksys WRV54G
Linksys RV082
etc.
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auraorangeAuthor Commented:
Ok so i can buy on of the above routers and attach it to the office PC and adsl (usb) broadband and configure it so I can dial in from home?

Im happy to have a go at this myself and if I fail then pay someone else.  

So if i buy one of the above it will allow me to dial in and access files from anywhere and i will integrate with the adsl broadband or do I need to get a static IP address for my ADSL?

Cheers

Mat
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plemieux72Commented:
You need the VPN router installed at the location you want to connect to.  From your initial post, it looks like that's at home.  In other words, if you want to be at work and connect to your home network, you need the VPN router installed at home.  

Vice-versa, if you are at home and want to connect to work, then you need to install the VPN router at work.

These two scenario are called "Remote Access VPN".  In this cases, you usually need a software VPN client installed on the PC you are using to connect.  XP includes a VPN client for PPTP and IPSec tunnels.  However, it's a little unflexible and if you obtain a Linksys or Cisco for example, they provide you with a VPN client which is much better than the XP VPN client.

Now, if you want to go a step further, buy two of the same VPN routers and install one in each location (if you work IT dept allows).  This would allow a permanent VPN tunnel between both sites and would allow you to access data on either network no matter at which site you are sitting.  For this to work, a static IP address at at least one of the two sites (better at both) would be required.

If you simply want remote access VPN, you don't really need a static IP since you can use a client that would update a DDNS service like dyndns.org.  This would allow you to connect to the router via a FQDN (frriendly DNS name) instead of a global IP address.  i.e.  myvpnrouter.dyndns.org  or  vpn.mycompany.com

Let me know what you decide and if you need any further help or details.

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auraorangeAuthor Commented:
I have created the following host:

meriden.no-ip.info for the server.

and installed the software from no-ip website

Is this right?

And now if i get a router and configure it correctly will i be able to create a VPN?

mat
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auraorangeAuthor Commented:
Also I have contacted Cisco to just to see if they have any more to say...

thanks for the feedback so far!
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plemieux72Commented:
I am not familiar with the no-ip software but if it's able to detect your public IP address and go update the no-ip.info DNS servers each time the address changes, that's what you need for a remote access VPN solution if you don't have a static IP.  

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auraorangeAuthor Commented:
Yeah thats what it does.

I used No-Ip because some people on here have meantioned it before and the guy at the pc shop meantioned it too

Thanks

mat
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plemieux72Commented:
Cool, so all you need then is a router that can terminate a VPN tunnel from a client on the outside.
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auraorangeAuthor Commented:
thank you
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