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OS and PC lifetime

hi all,

this is kind of frantic question but I was wondering was is the avarage lifetime of PC, and when is it considered unrelieble and when should we ditch it...  :) I've never had a computer more then 1 year so I wouldn't know...

same question about OS, particularly win2k
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davidlars99
Asked:
davidlars99
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4 Solutions
 
softplusCommented:
Here we use 3-4 years for bookkeeping purposes. Considering the average "long" guarantee time is 3 years, I wouldn't plan for over 3 years. PCs might last much longer though (I'd guess an average of 4-5 years?), you just can't be sure :) - if you want to be sure, use 3 years. I'd swap the OS when swaping the PC, you can take better advantage of the new hardware and drivers are generally better (unless your company wants to keep one OS for all workstations).
John
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harleyjdCommented:
Yep, what John said, except for one point.

OEM licences (the kind that come as a sticker on the box only) are not transferrable. When you write off the PC, you must also write off the licence. This goes for ALL OEM software, but specifically Microsoft Windows and Office.

Win2k Pro is worth upgrading to XP now, as XP has a lower resource overhead, better support and is just a nicer system.

I wouldn't upgrade Win2k Server unless there was a good reason (Latest apps needed, hi colour Terminal Server, blah blah)

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Danny ChildIT ManagerCommented:
There aren't any realistic plans to replace XP before the end of the decade, so if your systems can run that ok, it's a good sign.  Applications, now that's a different story, and you'll have to listen to the users about that one.  

If you are replacing systems, keep an eye on 64bit  - it may limit future upgrades if you don't!
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ChaitanyaKhaladkarCommented:
Hi,
Generally, the hardware life can be expected to be 3-4 years. Same with the OS.

But, on a milder note, as a technician, If it ain't broke, don't fix it! :)
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davidlars99Author Commented:
thanks everybody... 3-4 years is for the PCs, how about servers shouldn't they last at least twice longer..?
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harleyjdCommented:
Servers run 24*7 in general, so they should not be frontline servers after 3 years. Either relegate them to secondary tasks or have a very redundant network.

I've been working with some 5 year old SBS4.5 boxes of late, and they are well past reliable...

I have some Dell 2400 & 2500 servers (4 & 5 yo) that are still running reliably, but the systems are well maintained.

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softplusCommented:
>how about servers shouldn't they last at least twice longer..?
Not really. They're more robust but used harder. It depends on how you dimension your equipment :) (i.e. storage, backup, speed, etc.). Your needs will invariably change over the course of a few years so I don't think you can really dimension a server to be "good enough" for now+1 year and hope that it's still "good enough" 4+ years later. Just think how your storage needs have grown since then; + server side applications are bound to change, think of Terminal Server, Exchange, Databases, etc. A simple file server with just some disks you can hot swap against a larger size might last a bit longer, but how long do you think you'll need "just storage"? (hard to tell)
I'd also go with 3-4 years max.
John
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davidlars99Author Commented:
I'm talking about server at home, using it like a regular PC not like heavy load  enterprise
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softplusCommented:
Oh, if it's at home, use it till it dies! Once you notice the HD slowing down, replace the disk or the server :).
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davidlars99Author Commented:
so... which server would you recommend under $3000-$4000-$5000 max. without the OS, just a clean server..?
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softplusCommented:
For home use? Use a normal PC :), if you just want a file server, go with the cheap NAS-type devices (Snap-Server, etc.). Anything else is usually overkill -- unless you really plan on using it like an "enterprise" server (i.e. connect the neighborhood, high-bandwidth web server, etc.). Also remember the noise level - a "real" server will have several high-rpm drives in it, many fans; I wouldn't want to have to sleep close to that thing :))
John
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davidlars99Author Commented:
so what server would you go with for enterprise purpose
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davidlars99Author Commented:
dell, gateway, HP or any other..?
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softplusCommented:
There's a thread open similar to this at the moment :) -
http://www.experts-exchange.com/Hardware/Q_21413620.html

I guess it depends on your needs.. I'd be best if you would open a new thread for that, with your specific requirements (users, storage, applications, etc.) so that the others can "find" it and chip in. (JamesHarrison  and Colin_UK  look like they've got lots of experience here :)). It's impossible to give a general recommendation without knowing more about what you plan on doing :))

John
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davidlars99Author Commented:
thank you! now I know what I wanted to know..  :)
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