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Problem: Slow-down and saving file onto the local server.

I am using a linksys wireless router g. Max number of user at one time are under 10 lap top pc. The internet connection is fine but the intranet is slow. I understand that if one person is streaming down a large file for the intranet (or distance) it will slow down everyone...but this is not the case even if only one person is using the wireless it's still slow.

I second thing is that, the user are having problem saving to the local network. Someone was trying to save a 10 MB xls file onto the network...it just stop. Is there something that I have to configure for user to be able to save onto the server?

Any input are much appreciate

perennial

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perennial
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perennial
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2 Solutions
 
AlasdairMcLCommented:
First of all, can you quantify slow? What kind of speeds are you getting, and how far away from the access point are all the client machines?

I'd suggest looking at environmental issues, are there any other wireless devices nearby, big power lines or noisy mains voltage? What kind of environment are you using the PCs in? If there are any other APs in range, they will interfere with your one, slowing down connection for everyone. Change the channel that you are using to one that is at least 2 away from any other devices.

54mbps is the maximum supported speed of 802.11g, but in practice you will be lucky to get half that. Check the signal strength in Windows on the wireless connection properties, as anything lower than the best signal will decrease your connection speed greatly.

I don't think there is a fault here as such, I suspect it's just the way it is but we'd need to look into this further. It's possible that the file that you were attempting to save to server failed because of some interference, if it happens again check to see whether you lost wireless connectivity at the same time.

Report back anyway, and we can look into this further.

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whtrbt7Commented:
I suggest a hard CAT5 or CAT6 line from the router to the server.  The reason for this being dropped packets.  Be sure to map out signal strength from the Linksys 802.11G router to prevent any network blind spots.  Average internal network Tx speeds should be about 36Mbps if the router is set up correctly.  Also make sure that you take off WEP128 and use MAC filtering for security because WEP128 can slow down your network as well.  
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AlasdairMcLCommented:
whtrbt7,

MAC filtering can be cracked if you have the time and the tools, and therefore it cannot be seen as an alternative to WEP. I would suggest using both WEP and a filter for the ultimate in security.

I agree with the CAT5 idea though, make as much of your network wired as it's faster and more reliable, and less likely to slow down.
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whtrbt7Commented:
The reason why I say nix the WEP128 is due to speed concerns.  Yes, MAC filtering is not as intensive as WEP but it will prevent encryption problems and throughput problems.  WEP can be cracked as well with time and tools so it's a matter of getting maximum speed or higher security.
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AlasdairMcLCommented:
true, it's really a case of which concern is more important, speed or security.
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AlasdairMcLCommented:
I suggest we split the points 50:50 unless there are any issues with the answers either of us have given.

whtrbt7, do you agree?
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