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Windows 2003 Clustering

I am currently trying to cluster 2 IDENTICAL boxes in Windows 2003.  I have no problems setting the cluster up.  I have already tested it by setting up a cluster using a Local Quorum and it works fine.  However, I want the Quorum to be located on my Q: drive that I have partitioned.  You are supposed to be able to set this at the time of cluster creation.  From what I've read, you can click the "Quorum" button during the Cluster Creation wizard and select whichever drive you want for the Quorum to be located.  However, the only options I have are "Local Quorum" and "Majority Node Set".  I should be seeing "Q: Drive" as one of the options, correct?  I am banging my head against the wall trying to create a cluster in Windows 2003.  I should not be having this much trouble with what I am doing.  It must be something easy that I'm missing, but I can't figure it out.  Please help.  Thank you.  
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runnerman71
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runnerman71
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
I haven't dealt with 2003 clusters, but in 2000 you would just right click the cluster name in Cluster Administrator and set the Quorum to whatever drive letter you wanted.
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runnerman71Author Commented:
Thank you for the input.  I have tried that.  The only option I have in the drop down menu is "Local Quorum".
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oBdACommented:
If you can't pick the Q: drive, it isn't recognized as a valid resource. What exactly is that Q: drive you're trying to access?
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runnerman71Author Commented:
It is a 10G drive that I have partitioned through Computer Management.  Do I need to do something special to it so that the Cluster wizard recognizes it as a valid resource?
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
I don't remember either of these in 2000:
 "Local Quorum" and "Majority Node Set"

But in 2000, Quorum had to be on a shared disk.  And that shared disk had to be part of a cluster group.  
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oBdACommented:
Local Quorum and Majority Node Set are new features of the Server 2003 cluster services.
Available features in Windows Server 2003 clusters
http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=278007

With "What exactly is that Q: drive" I wanted to know whether it was a shared disk on a SAN or a shared disk on a "real" SCSI bus; anything else will not be available as Quorum (if you leave out the local/majority business).
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runnerman71Author Commented:
OK, I have figured it out.  the Q: drive does need to be a drive configured as a SAN volume.  I configured a local drive and shared it out thinking it would be the same thing.  I'm in business now.  Thanks for everyone's input.
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