Creating secure wireless network

I recently had Verizon fiber optic installed, and they put in a D-Link 624 wireless router. I use a wireless adapter on the second computer. My network is visible to the neighbors, and my question is can I create a secure network, so nearby users can't use my bandwidth (or see my shared files....)??  Wondering if there's a way to include a network key, or some other form of authentication when trying to access my network. I'm kind of a network newbie, so i'm hoping there's an uncomplicated solution. Otherwise, I might have to re-think the wireless option. Thanks!
jalvord1Asked:
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luv2smileCommented:
First very simple steps:

Turn off SSID broadcasting so your access point doesn't yell out to everyone in range of it and say "hey, look at me....I'm an open AP, come connect to me"

Change your SSID to something besides the default name

Use MAC address filtering so that only devices you specify can use your network

That should pretty much stop *most* users from being able to connect to your AP and use it for their own internet access

Now.....that takes care of that part, but then there is securing the data you send over your wireless network so that anyone sitting in range with a sniffer won't be able to read your unecrypted data

WEP used to be the most widely used method, but WEP is easily hacked so WAP is the latest method commonly used....as said in the article below...use the highest method available and applicapable in your environment.

Here is a good simple outline of things I just mentioned plus some other basic points:

http://www.upenn.edu/computing/wireless/general/homesecurity.html
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mtpcbypcCommented:
http://www.experts-exchange.com/Networking/Q_21399063.html
see this by Robing66066 - very complete description
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Leon FesterSenior Solutions ArchitectCommented:
In combination with the above suggestions, you can also enable MAC address filtering on the router. It will then only allow MAC addresses configured in the database to access the network. MAC Addresses are unique to each network card/router, so they chances of your computer have the same MAC address are nil. Although it is possible to do MAC address spoofing, I think it may be beyond the scope of little johnny next door.
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jalvord1Author Commented:
Thanks for the valuable info, but I have have to ask some stupid questions: How do I change the settings (SSID, Mac Filtering, etc)? Do I make those changes on the remote computer, or the one that is connected to the wireless router?  Do I log into the IP address of the router to make those changes, or is it something done within Windows? Sorry if this is a dumb question... I just need to know how to make these changes....
Thanks
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jalvord1Author Commented:
I've successfully made a mess of things now. I had to wire-connect to the router to pick up my network now, because I can't connect with the wireless adapter now.... I made some changes to the settings, but I can't get the wireless card to connect to the network. I think I need a step by step procedure on how to make the changes on both the wireless router and then on the remote computer with the wireless adapter... :(
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mtpcbypcCommented:
Comment from mtpcbypc
Date: 05/09/2005 11:03AM MDT
 Your Comment  


http://www.experts-exchange.com/Networking/Q_21399063.html 
see this by Robing66066 - very complete description

Robin really did a good job you should look at this link.  

To answer your last question.  You have to make all of your setting changes while you are wire connected to the router.  Otherwise you will disconnect yourself.  Just like you did.  Make the changes in the Router first then copy all of those changes to the advance section of the properties of your wireless connection.
I have had problems with some older routers with old versions of firmware not using WEP or WPA correctly so you may want to look into the upgrade firmware section of your router's configuration and download the most current version of you "exact model's" firmware from the manufacturers support site and upgrade router.

good luck
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jalvord1Author Commented:
Thanks for all your help. Think I'm getting somewhere. I've renamed the AP, but the old name still appears on the wireless network card. The old name is "default", but that name has been changed. The computer with the wireless card still picks up that AP, but the beacon has been turned off and the name has been changed. Any clues why this happens? The wireless adapter shouldn't be seeing this...
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mtpcbypcCommented:
Good Question.  Your properly configured connection is going out and requesting a paticular SSID and without the beacon on your AP is not responding until your connection requests it.  As soon as the service starts on you computer the wireless connection makes the requests for known SSID's even if they are not broadcasting that name.  OR you have a neighbor who needs the same help because their AP is broadcasting its SSID and the unit hasn't been configured.  This is only true if you can see the connection under "view available wireless networks".   If you are seeing it there my last statement is possible.  If not it is probably only visible in the lower window of the properties of the wireless connection called "prefered networks"  if it is only here it is a leftover ghost connection that you should just be able to delete as long as you are connecting to the new SSID that your AP is using.
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