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Optimal Mac server OS

I need advice on setting up a server for aproximately 10 Macs (OS 10). I have a spare Windows 2003 CD but was wondering if a better option would be to go for Linux. I have some experience with Windows 2003 and would be willing to learn Linux if this is the best option. Thanks.
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OZSJ
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OZSJ
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brettmjohnsonCommented:
The Optimal Mac Server OS is Mac OS X Server 10.4.
It is simple to set up and install. 10.4 supports ACLs to make
working with shared folders much easier than earlier versions.

I would not even consider Windows Server 2003, considering
the numerous integration problems we see in this forum.


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sgstuartCommented:
HI OZSJ,
    I concur with Brett, and would recommend that.   OSX now days does use Linux in the background, and if you can learn Linux OSX  or OSX Server is just another flavor, at least that is how you can look at it.  Most Linux commands will work on OSX.

Thanks,
Steven Stuart
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sgstuartCommented:
Hi OZSJ,
    There should be a "," after Linux.   The one sentence should read OSX now days uses Linux in the background (as opposed to OS 9 and earlier), and if you can learn Linux, OSX or OSX Server is just another flavor of Linux, at least that is how you can look at it.

Thanks,
Steven Stuart
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brettmjohnsonCommented:
Actually Mac OS X is built upon Free BSD, not Linux.
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sgstuartCommented:
Hi Brett,
   Free BSD is a form of Linux, that is why Linux and UNIX software work on it.   Which is why I called it a flavour of Linux.   Yes, you are correct it is Free BSD.   That would be like saying Red Hat Linux, is not Linux, because it is Red Hat Linux,  of  or saying that Yellow Dog Linux is not and so forth.    It is Linux based, but has a much nicer GUI on top.

Thanks,
Steven Stuart
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brettmjohnsonCommented:
Free BSD is NOT Linux.   Free BSD is a derivative of the Berkeley Unix Distribution,
which itself is a derivative of the original AT&T Unix and predates Linux by a decade.  
Linux is a Unix-like OS that implements the Unix System V APIs, but is very different
from Unix underneath.

Mac OS is build on top of Mach 3 with a combo FreeBSD/OpenBSD/ userland.
Mac OS X is a direct descendent of NeXTstep 4.2, built on top of Mach 2.5 with a BSD 4.3
userland.   The BSD fork of Unix originated at Berkeley in early 1978.  The first versions of
NeXTstep were derived from BSD-based SunOS in 1986.  Linux was a clean-room
implementation of the Unix system APIs, based upon a Minix architecture, written
by a college student in 1991.  Mac OS X can in no way be considered a Linux
distribution like Red Hat, Yellow Dog, or SUSE.

http://www.levenez.com/unix/history.html#05
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sgstuartCommented:
Hi Brett,
         Actually, I knew all of that, except for the NOT Linux part.    Sometimes I get words mixed up and I do that alot with UNIX and Linux, especially since I work on and with both, and I do not really see/understand the difference.   I think the only thing I can think of maybe is that XWindows only works on UNIX (but I could be wrong about that too).   I do know that OSX can have XWindows on it, because I have installed it, which tells me that it is UNIX.   I also know that all of the O'Reilly books for Mac talk about UNIX commands, which I have 10 or more of, so I should have known it from there as well.     So my apologies to everyone on getting my words mixed up in my head.

     Thank you Brett for setting me straight.   Actually, if you have a good link that explains some differences between UNIX/Linux  that would be great.

Thanks,
Steven Stuart


       
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