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sudo not found

I am running AIX 4.3.3 and I have downloaded and installed (by extracting the files) the correct version.

I ran visudo and simply set it to:

someuser  ALL=(ALL) NOPASSWD:ALL

I login as someuser and I get ksh: sudo: not found.

Can anyone help?
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biffsmith
Asked:
biffsmith
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1 Solution
 
biffsmithAuthor Commented:
I should also say that I have /usr/local/bin in someuser's PATH and that's where sudo was un-tarred to on my server.  

Additionally - I can run sudo when I login as root.
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Kent OlsenData Warehouse Architect / DBACommented:


Check the permissions on sudo.  Make sure it's accessible to the other user.  chmod 555 comes to mind.  :)




Kent

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TintinCommented:
What are the results of:

ls -l `which sudo`

or

ls -l /usr/local/bin/sudo

and

echo $PATH
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biffsmithAuthor Commented:
Well - I think the problem goes deeper than sudo.  Ever since I installed it this afternoon, I now cannot run any batch programs in my someuser's directory without typing in the entire path to the batch file.

Here's the situation:  login is dsmith -- directory is /home/dsmith -- I have a script file named 1 that I usually run simply by typing 1 <enter> (because, when I log in I'm automatically in the /home/dsmith directory) and now it says /bin/ksh: 1: not found.  So - it's the same error that I was getting trying to run sudo.  My path statement obviously has my /home/dsmith directory on it so I'm sure this is a bigger problem.  

Additionally - loggin in as root and cd to /home/dsmith - I still cannot run the 1 script file without typing /home/dsmith/1.

Any thoughts?
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TintinCommented:
When you login as dsmith, what is the output of

echo $PATH

root should *never* have . in the PATH, as it is a security risk.
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biffsmithAuthor Commented:
Tintin:

Here's the results of echo $PATH for my login:

$ echo $PATH
/usr/bin:/etc:/usr/sbin:/usr/ucb:/home/dsmith/bin:/usr/bin/X11:/sbin:/usr/local/bin.

Why would this start happening all of a sudden - after [trying to] install sudo?
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TintinCommented:
There's your problem.

Look at the end of your PATH, you have

/usr/local/bin.

instead of

/usr/local/bin

I suspect that it used to be:

...:/usr/local/bin:.

Note the missing colon.  This would also explain why you can't run scripts in your current directory without specifying the path.
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biffsmithAuthor Commented:
Tintin:

You are a genius!  The problem with running my scripts is now fixed.  However - am still getting ksh: sudo: not found when I try to run sudo as dsmith.

However - when I try to run it as root it works.  Here's the results of 'which sudo':


# which sudo
/usr/local/bin/sudo
#

Any ideas as to why I can't run sudo?  /usr/local/bin is in my path.
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TintinCommented:
What does

ls -l /usr/local/bin/sudo

report?
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TintinCommented:
If the perms aren't

---s--x--x

Then do

chmod 4111 /usr/local/bin/sudo

as the root user.

Also make sure it is owned by root.
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biffsmithAuthor Commented:
Here are the results of ls -l /usr/local/bin/sudo.  By the way - I cannot run the ls -l command on /usr/local/bin/sudo logged in as myself -- I had to su to root.

# ls -l /usr/local/bin/sudo
---s--x--x   2 root     system    138579 Apr 03 21:09 /usr/local/bin/sudo
#

Any ideas?
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Kent OlsenData Warehouse Architect / DBACommented:

Is 'sudo' a script file or executable object?

If it's a script, try commenting the first line (with several '#') so that the shell uses the default shell processor.  It may be that the script is specifying a shell that's not available on AIX.

Kent
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biffsmithAuthor Commented:
Kent:

sudo is an executable as far as I know.  I downloaded the binary package for AIX 4.3.3.

Debbie
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Kent OlsenData Warehouse Architect / DBACommented:

That's not conclusive.  A lot of packages run via a script.

Use od(1) or head(1) to see the top of the file.  It'll be very obvious whether it's text or binary.


Kent
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biffsmithAuthor Commented:
Kent:

It's definitely binary.

Debbie
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TintinCommented:
If you can't

ls -l /usr/local/bin/sudo

as yourself, then you will have screwed permissions on either /usr/local or /usr/local/bin, or both.

As root, do

ls -ld /usr/local
ls -ld /usr/local/bin

They should have perms of 755.
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biffsmithAuthor Commented:
That was it!  Thanks, Tintin.  You are my hero for today!

Deb
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