[Last Call] Learn how to a build a cloud-first strategyRegister Now

x
  • Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 71511
  • Last Modified:

Embed Image in HTML

For efficiency reasons, as well as for purposes of server-side statelessness, I would like to embed the image data of a gif directly in my HTML.  This is described in http://www.elf.org/essay/inline-image.html, however, none of the examples work in Internet Explorer.

There's no problem using JavaScript--it's just that I was unable to find any example that worked.
0
poohbear_68
Asked:
poohbear_68
  • 4
  • 2
  • 2
  • +2
1 Solution
 
ZylochCommented:
One of the methods they speak of on the site is directly putting the image data in the image tag. This works for all browsers besides IE. I tested this with IE and it didn't work, but it did work on my newest version of Mozilla Firefox.

Here is the tag:
<img src="data:image/png;base64,Qk12BQAAAAAAADYAAAAoAAAAFQAAABUAAAABABgAAAAAAEAFAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAO6qp KqOiKqOiKqOiKqOiKqOiKqOiKqOiKqOiKqOiKqOiO6qpTLGwTLGwTLGwTLGwTLGwTLGwTLGwTLGw TLGwAEyxsDuqqSqjoiqjoiqjoiqjoiqjoiqjoiqjoiqjoiqjoiqjojuqqUyxsEyxsEyxsEyxsEyx sEyxsEyxsEyxsABMsbBMsbA7qqkqo6Iqo6Iqo6Iqo6Iqo6Iqo6Iqo6Iqo6Iqo6Iqo6I7qqlMsbBM sbBMsbBMsbBMsbBMsbBMsbAATLGwTLGwTLGwO6qpKqOiKqOiKqOiKqOiKqOiKqOiKqOiKqOiKqOi KqOiO6qpTLGwTLGwTLGwTLGwTLGwTLGwAEyxsEyxsEyxsEyxsDuqqSqjoiqjoiqjoiqjoiqjoiqj oiqjoiqjoiqjoiqjojuqqUyxsEyxsEyxsEyxsEyxsABMsbBMsbBMsbBMsbBMsbA7qqkqo6Iqo6Iq o6Iqo6Iqo6Iqo6Iqo6Iqo6Iqo6Iqo6I7qqlMsbBMsbBMsbBMsbAATLGwTLGwTLGwTLGwTLGwTLGw O6qpKqOiKqOiKqOiKqOiKqOiKqOiKqOiKqOiKqOiKqOiO6qpTLGwTLGwTLGwAEyxsEyxsEyxsEyx sEyxsEyxsEyxsDuqqSqjoiqjoiqjoiqjoiqjoiqjoiqjoiqjoiqjoiqjojuqqUyxsEyxsABMsbBM sbBMsbBMsbBMsbBMsbBMsbBMsbA7qqkqo6Iqo6Iqo6Iqo6Iqo6Iqo6Iqo6Iqo6Iqo6Iqo6I7qqlM sbAATLGwTLGwTLGwTLGwTLGwTLGwTLGwTLGwTLGwO6qpKqOiKqOiKqOiKqOiKqOiKqOiKqOiKqOi KqOiKqOiO6qpADuqqUyxsEyxsEyxsEyxsEyxsEyxsEyxsEyxsEyxsDuqqSqjoiqjoiqjoiqjoiqj oiqjoiqjoiqjoiqjoiqjogAqo6I7qqlMsbBMsbBMsbBMsbBMsbBMsbBMsbBMsbBMsbA7qqkqo6Iq o6Iqo6Iqo6Iqo6Iqo6Iqo6Iqo6Iqo6IAKqOiKqOiO6qpTLGwTLGwTLGwTLGwTLGwTLGwTLGwTLGw TLGwO6qpKqOiKqOiKqOiKqOiKqOiKqOiKqOiKqOiACqjoiqjoiqjojuqqUyxsEyxsEyxsEyxsEyx sEyxsEyxsEyxsEyxsDuqqSqjoiqjoiqjoiqjoiqjoiqjoiqjogAqo6Iqo6Iqo6Iqo6I7qqlMsbBM sbBMsbBMsbBMsbBMsbBMsbBMsbBMsbA7qqkqo6Iqo6Iqo6Iqo6Iqo6Iqo6IAKqOiKqOiKqOiKqOi KqOiO6qpTLGwTLGwTLGwTLGwTLGwTLGwTLGwTLGwTLGwO6qpKqOiKqOiKqOiKqOiKqOiACqjoiqj oiqjoiqjoiqjoiqjojuqqUyxsEyxsEyxsEyxsEyxsEyxsEyxsEyxsEyxsDuqqSqjoiqjoiqjoiqj ogAqo6Iqo6Iqo6Iqo6Iqo6Iqo6Iqo6I7qqlMsbBMsbBMsbBMsbBMsbBMsbBMsbBMsbBMsbA7qqkq o6Iqo6Iqo6IAKqOiKqOiKqOiKqOiKqOiKqOiKqOiKqOiO6qpTLGwTLGwTLGwTLGwTLGwTLGwTLGw TLGwTLGwO6qpKqOiKqOiACqjoiqjoiqjoiqjoiqjoiqjoiqjoiqjoiqjojuqqUyxsEyxsEyxsEyx sEyxsEyxsEyxsEyxsEyxsDuqqSqjogAqo6Iqo6Iqo6Iqo6Iqo6Iqo6Iqo6Iqo6Iqo6Iqo6I7qqlM sbBMsbBMsbBMsbBMsbBMsbBMsbBMsbBMsbA7qqkA" />

You may change image/png to image/jpg or image/gif but IE still refuses to show the image. You can find the encoding of the image by using this PHP code:

<?php
$fp = fopen("pic.jpg","rb");
$picture = fread($fp,filesize("pic.jpg"));
fclose($fp);
$base64 = chunk_split(base64_encode($picture));
echo "<img src=\"data:image/png;base64,".$encoded."\" />';
?>

I will test the other methods in IE for you.
0
 
ZylochCommented:
The first Javascript method did not seem to work in either Firefox or IE, or I might just be implementing it wrong. Anyhow, I would not suggest using such a method currently. The browsers are not well designed to handle these changes yet. Who knows? Perhaps in the next release of Firefox or in IE7, things will be in a better light!
0
 
poohbear_68Author Commented:
The first method is definitely a clean solution, but it's not worth implementing anything if I there's no solution that works in Internet Explorer.  I may have to resign to waiting for IE 7.

I presume that binding an image will only set its url, not the actual data?
0
Independent Software Vendors: We Want Your Opinion

We value your feedback.

Take our survey and automatically be enter to win anyone of the following:
Yeti Cooler, Amazon eGift Card, and Movie eGift Card!

 
gregoryyoungCommented:
umm it is a clean solution (of course it uses 3 times the bandwith on the base64 encoding).

check here ... works in most major browsers.

http://www.bennherrera.com/EmbeddedImage/

Greg
0
 
GrandSchtroumpfCommented:
> http://www.bennherrera.com/EmbeddedImage/
Geez louise... Those are TABLES!!!
That's quite interesting.
0
 
gregoryyoungCommented:
that they are ... a rather simple implmentation but it works (and in i.e.) :)

anyway you do it, its a bad idea for anything more than 64x64 MAYBE 128x128 as it absolutly kills your throughput.

Greg
0
 
poohbear_68Author Commented:
This idea is indeed a highly creative one and effectively deals with the browser limitations in Internet Explorer--the first solution I've encountered that even begins to work in IE.  The problem of throughput is a cost that is inherent with embedding binary data in a text transport.

The biggest problem with this solution is that, from the standpoint of a user, it does not feel like an authentic solution.  Here's why:

-A printable 256x256 image takes anywhere from 200ms-750ms to render.  Internet Explorer hangs during this time, and makes the site seem slow.
-The user cannot right-click on the image to save a copy.
-Copying out the image to the clipboard and pasting it into an application such as Microsoft Word is very slow, and of course, Microsoft Word does not come close to rendering this as an image.

These problems could perhaps be overcome by:

-Optimizing the image rendering.  I am unsure how document.write calls into an IFRAME compares with DOM generation.  If I recall correctly, the latter is somewhat slow in most browsers, especially when used extensively.  I'm curious how document.write would perform when rendering an image with particularly succinct HTML.
-The right-click could be disabled, and a link could be added to the page that would allow the user to download the image through a separate request to the server.  (The purpose of this embedded image, as I pointed out earlier, is to lessen the burden of statefulness by the server.  The user would need to wait 20-30 seconds for the server to generate the image when saving to the hard-drive.)
-The document could be laid out in such a way that, with some JavaScript coding, the user would be unable to select the image.  (Obviously this would have to happen at a lower level than mere mouse clicks.)

Then, I would end up with a generic DHTML/JavaScript control that would look and feel very much like a flash control.

In summary, this is a very interesting idea and may merit points not because it is a solution that performs particularly well, but because it is a solution that performs at all.
0
 
poohbear_68Author Commented:
Having written an essay about the table approach, I would like to offer two counter solutions that I thought of, not because I believe they're the ideal solution, but because I believe a critique must follow up with constructive feedback.

My first idea is quite simple: the server could have a custom script that would receive the contents of the image in the query string (if IE indeed allows URLs that long; otherwise, in the POST data), and return it as an image.  Yes, this does mean that the image content is transferred three times--twice in a text-friendly format (perhaps base36 encoded or some other proprietary format) and once in a binary format.

My second idea is similar, although I'm not exactly sure of the implementation details.  Essentially, the src of the image could contain the base64-encoded version of the image, and the low-res url could contain a path to the lengthy server-side process that regenerates the image.  Presumably IE would not recognize the first and would request the image from the second URL.  All other browsers would render the image immediately.

Here's yet a twist on these ideas:  The HTML page containing the image could include a global JavaScript variable including the base64 encoded data.  In IE, the script would write out an image with a url for either the give-me-an-image-for-this-data script (idea 1) or the lengthy server-side process (idea 2).  For all other browsers, it would simple write out an image tag with the base64 encoded data in the src tag.

The problem with these ideas is that it penalizes users for browsing with IE.  This is a controversial subject, of course, but given the large target audience of IE users, I believe it's a fairly large strike against the ideas.

If the problem cannot be satisfactorily solved client-side (which I hate to say is true, but might be), the only option is beefing up the servers.  I cannot pre-emptively generate my HTML page, because the server process needs to display a status.  The obvious server-side solution is optimizing the server application until the image can be generated through its own URL/entrypoint.  At that point, the HTML page can be generated either pre-emptively or using the same backend server process.  Perhaps that's what everyone else has been doing up till now.  Still, that's a lot of work, and I believe there would be a good bit of potential in well-designed embedded images.
0
 
poohbear_68Author Commented:
As a final thought (as I mentioned before) the accepted solution ay not merit points not because it is a solution that performs particularly well, but because it is a solution that performs at all.  The best solution is to wait for the IE7 beta and explore the possibilities there.
0
 
tweensteeplesCommented:
that is a completely stupid idea. you guys need to do some research and get this question answered. stop linking to off-site crap. cut and paste if you have to but stop taking me off-site to dead links. lazy, lazy, lazy, lazy.
0

Featured Post

New feature and membership benefit!

New feature! Upgrade and increase expert visibility of your issues with Priority Questions.

  • 4
  • 2
  • 2
  • +2
Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now