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all domain names of A class

Posted on 2005-05-12
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Last Modified: 2010-04-10
Hi,
could you write me link where is list of all DNS addresses of A class? I guess, there is 128 of those addresses, because it is determined by the first byte of IP address (and first bit must be zero to recognize A class). Am I write?

thanks
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Question by:xLeon
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by:mikeleebrla
ID: 13987214
i think you are missunderstanding IP addressing and subnetting a class A refers to the BLOCK of addresses that an ISP assigns to someone. FYI a class a block has 16,777,216 addresses, not 128 so you are a little off.  DNS names point to ONE IP address generally (no subnet is involved with DNS naming) so DNS addresses don't, can't, never will, point to a class A, B or C address.  DNS names point to ONE address which may be part of an A, B, or C class range but as far as DNS is concerned it doesn't matter what class it is.  
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pseudocyber earned 200 total points
ID: 13987627
Perhaps xLeon wants to know who the A's are registered to?  You can to go http://www.arin.net/ and put the A's in one at a time and get the results:  

Search results for: 1.0.0.0


OrgName:    Internet Assigned Numbers Authority
OrgID:      IANA
Address:    4676 Admiralty Way, Suite 330
City:       Marina del Rey
StateProv:  CA
PostalCode: 90292-6695
Country:    US

NetRange:   1.0.0.0 - 1.255.255.255
CIDR:       1.0.0.0/8
NetName:    RESERVED-9
NetHandle:  NET-1-0-0-0-1
Parent:    
NetType:    IANA Reserved
Comment:    
RegDate:    
Updated:    2002-09-12

Search results for: 2.0.0.0


OrgName:    Internet Assigned Numbers Authority
OrgID:      IANA
Address:    4676 Admiralty Way, Suite 330
City:       Marina del Rey
StateProv:  CA
PostalCode: 90292-6695
Country:    US

NetRange:   2.0.0.0 - 2.255.255.255
CIDR:       2.0.0.0/8
NetName:    RESERVED-2
NetHandle:  NET-2-0-0-0-1
Parent:    
NetType:    IANA Reserved
Comment:    
RegDate:    1995-07-07
Updated:    2002-09-12

Search results for: 3.0.0.0


OrgName:    General Electric Company
OrgID:      GENERA-9
Address:    1 Independence Way
City:       Princeton
StateProv:  NJ
PostalCode: 08540
Country:    US

NetRange:   3.0.0.0 - 3.255.255.255
CIDR:       3.0.0.0/8
NetName:    GE-INTERNET
NetHandle:  NET-3-0-0-0-1
Parent:    
NetType:    Direct Assignment
NameServer: NS.GE.COM
NameServer: NS1.GE.COM
NameServer: NS2.GE.COM
Comment:    
RegDate:    1988-02-23
Updated:    2002-09-26

Search results for: 4.0.0.0


OrgName:    Level 3 Communications, Inc.
OrgID:      LVLT
Address:    1025 Eldorado Blvd.
City:       Broomfield
StateProv:  CO
PostalCode: 80021
Country:    US

ReferralServer: rwhois://rwhois.level3.net:4321

NetRange:   4.0.0.0 - 4.255.255.255
CIDR:       4.0.0.0/8
NetName:    LVLT-ORG-4-8
NetHandle:  NET-4-0-0-0-1
Parent:    
NetType:    Direct Allocation
NameServer: NS1.LEVEL3.NET
NameServer: NS2.LEVEL3.NET
Comment:    
RegDate:    
Updated:    2004-06-04

Etc. etc.




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by:xLeon
ID: 13988099
Yes, that's what I was looking for. So if I understand it good I can find all subjects who owns A class with 1.0.0.0 - 128.0.0.0? And every of those 128 subjects has about 16 million computers? Isn't it too much e.g. for MIT? Is it possible for university to have 16 million computers?

thanks both
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by:pseudocyber
ID: 13988252
No, they don't have a billion computers.  They have a billion addresses.  Two different things ;)
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by:pseudocyber
ID: 13989064
And just because there's 1 -128, doesn't mean those class A's aren't subnetted.
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by:xLeon
ID: 13989170
I only wanted to point to fact that they're probably wasting address space they don't need. I had rather to write that they have possibility to have 16 million computer.
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by:mikeleebrla
ID: 13989297
what exacly are you trying to find out?  i doubt MIT has an entire class A assigned to it. Class As are generally assigned to ISPsactually classes really aren't used anymore since CIDER is used since it doesn't waste as many addresses.  for example if i needed 5 addresses and the class system was used then the only option would be to give me a class C (256 addresses) so 251 would be wasted. instead i would be issued a /29 range (6 addresses).
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by:xLeon
ID: 13989385
thanks for clarification, my thoughts were only theoretical and I don't know much about practise. I must learn a lot yet.
I thought, there are organizations or institutions that are able to create much larger networks than MIT or others, but I suppose that it's because internet has it's origin in USA.
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by:mikeleebrla
ID: 13989447
any network really only needs 1 PUBLIC ip address.  one public ip address can be used to allow 1000s of computers to connect to the internet via NAT/PAT (Network Address Translation/Port Address Translation).
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by:xLeon
ID: 13989631
I already heard a little about NAT (and subnetting) few days ago. I will look at it properly to know how things are.
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