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explain HDTV......explain various DVD qualities.........explain what DVD +R/RW means as far as quality

I am interested in buying a lower priced DVD recorder to get started transferring my vhs tapes to dvd. The seller tells me that he used it once, and then he got HDTV.......He tells me what the DVD recorder will do and then he tells me it is not HDTV. I assume HD is high definition. What quality is HD as compared to dvd's you buy in a store?
What other quality explanation can you give me as it relates to DVD's.
Explain all I need to know about DVD +R/RW, which is the format on this DVD recorder.
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nickg5
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nickg5
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5 Solutions
 
Diane258Commented:
Alright, First let me tell you about resulotion. normal TV has a resulotion of (i think) 320x430. the numbers repensert how many Vertial lines x How many Horzintal lines

i think i got the way correct.

BUT if you want to Xfer VHS to DVD, all you really need is a DVD recorder and the VCR.

NOTE that when you press play on the VCR, and record on the DVD. you will not have perfect quality. when you view it on your tv the image will not be as sharp or as defined as normal DVD is. Meaning, the vidoe quality will not be spectuatular...in fact you might be a little dissapointed. There is no way around this except for buying the dvd version of the movie(recomended)  however for home movies...well this is about all you can do.

I think the salesman was talking S@!t about the HDTV thing.

HDTV is a higher resulution tv signal. What that means is the the image is sharper and more clear than normal TV.  

THink of it as seeing an old movie that looks "fuzzy" then watching the remastered edition where everything is sharp


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nickg5Author Commented:
You have me disappointed with the quality already.
Is it that bad?
I do not demand great quality as some of my VHS tapes are not great. Decent quality is good enough.
The DVD recorder is as cheap as you can find so maybe the quality of the recorder will be a factor too. The salesman is actually a seller on Ebay.
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Diane258Commented:
Oh that explains it then.

But Don't expect great quality. If you have ever seen Movies or TV Shows that were downloaded from the internet(please don't confirm that you have) you should know that those are either DVD rips or copied from HDTV.

This link
http://arstechnica.com/guides/tweaks/cleaning.ars/1

talks about video cleaning, it also provies some screenshots that will provide with with some idea what to expect when viewing them on a PC. on a TV they may look a little cleaner.

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nickg5Author Commented:
what can you tell me about DVD +R/RW.......?
is that standard format or is it the lowest grade.
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joey_the_assCommented:
normal storebought DVD's will have a resolution of 720x480, which is slightly higher than broadcast TV.
Your VHS tapes transferred to DVD will only have their original resolution, which is probably 640x480
Hi-Definition TV has a resolution of either 1280x720 progressive or 1920x1080 interlaced.
Progressive means it draws all the lines in one pass, interlaced means it draws odd numbered lines on one pass, and then goes back and hits the even ones.

As for DVDs, there are two formats DVD+R/RW and DVD-R/RW.  If the burner is made in the past two years or so, it probably supports all formats. In which case the -R is probably your best bet.
The RW (rewriteable formats) are more expensive and less stable than their write once counterparts, so don't even bother with them.  And -R is generally more compatable with set top players than +R.
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nickg5Author Commented:
This DVD recorder is a  DVD+R/RW  only..............so that is not good?
I would hope the DVD's would play on my table top player, in my computer and laptop.
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joey_the_assCommented:
If you buy good quality blank media, it should still be OK.  Blank DVD compatibilty is really very hit or miss.

http://www.digitalfaq.com/media/dvdmedia.htm

Here's a site that tells you who makes the better quality media
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rindiCommented:
When it says the DVD recorder is +R/RW only,this means you can only use this type of blank media for recording. You should still be able to play any type of media, including the -R/RW types. And just to clarify the above notes on putting your vcr tapes onto DVD, The so copied DVD will have the same quality as your Tape did at the time of recording, there's no way of improving the quality, except if you had some sort of studio like they have in Hollywood where you could edit and remaster the movie. The advantage of putting your tapes onto DVD is that DVD films won't deteriorate in quality with every watching of the film, like VCR's do (DVD's can still go bad, but that isn't caused just by watching the movie, but by either bad DVD blank media or bad handling, or if you use RW media). This is also good for archiving.
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mysticaldanCommented:
Ok, just to add a little there for you. When u use a VHS tape to record back to the DVD the quality is an issue u can address a little easily. If the tapes are in pristine conditions u can achieve a recording almost comparable to DVD in visual quality while the audio can be at best Stereo or maybe even Mono which most programs will convert to Stereo.

The salesman probably was mentioning DV and not HDTV whic offers the features he was mentioning abt. Look at it like a modified VCR with the resolution higher than that of a DVD. While a DVD can have a resolution of over 1200 Mbps or maybe all the way upto  2200 Mbps for bandwidth. Same can apply for a high quality VHS tape also which wont dissapoint u in terms of video but the audio might be a little lacking. However when i say that it does not mean the video quality is gonna be super and it will be equal to what u see on the TV so if thats fine with u then ur in.

Regarding media i wouldnt reccomend getting RW's since they have compatibility problems playing on various players so get urself DVDr's. As long as u stick to DVDR's u shudnt have any problems with most players and all shud be well. However anything that goes with an RW in frnt of it can be trbl and also DVD RAMS so take care.

Good Luck

Dan
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CallandorCommented:
> normal storebought DVD's will have a resolution of 720x480, which is slightly higher than broadcast TV.

I beg to differ - DVD is much better than broadcast TV: see http://hometheater.about.com/cs/television/a/aavideoresa.htm
At 262 lines of resolution (240 usable), it compares poorly to the 480 of DVDs, but you would see the difference more on a large screen.  HDTV is indeed a giant step up, and can make the image appear as if looking through a window.

Transferring tapes to DVD will not increase the resolution, but what it can do is prevent the image from degrading.  After several years of storage, the tape will suffer magnetic bleed through from magnetized tape being placed next to magnetized tape.  The image will acquire strange colors and lose resolution.  DVD+R is close in compatability to DVD-R as far as standalone players go: http://www.cdrinfo.com/Sections/DVDMediaFormats/
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crazijoeCommented:
Broadcast TV is getting better. Where I live, 3 of our local network stations (ABC, CBS, NBC) are transmitting in both HDTV and Analog over the airwaves. Granted you still need a set that will receive the signal. They are fighting with the local cable companies because of the FCC ruling that the TV stations have to transmit the signal for free and the cable companies are charging for HDTV connection in the home.
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